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Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City ebook

by Carolyn E. Tate


This urgency underlies Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City .

This urgency underlies Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City, Carolyn Tate's comprehensive catalog and analysis of all the city's extant buildings and sculptures. During a year of field work, Tate fully documented the appearance of the site as of 1987. The process of making public art is considered in relation to other modes of aesthetic expression, such as oral tradition and ritual. For each sculpture and building, she records its discovery, present location, condition, measurements, and astronomical orientation and reconstructs its Long Counts and Julian dates from Calendar Rounds.

Art historian Carolyn Tate presents, in a well-organized and amply illustrated two-part format, a holistic treatment of a single archaeological site - the great ancient Maya city of Yaxchilan. This is the most successful attempt to relate within a Maya site that I have seen.

Art historian Carolyn Tate presents, in a well-organized and amply illustrated two-part format, a holistic treatment of a single archaeological site-the great ancient Maya city of Yaxchilan.

As archaeologists peel away the jungle covering that has both obscured and preserved the ancient Maya cities of Mexico and Central America, other scholars have only a limited time to study and understand the sites before the jungle, weather, and human encroachment efface them again, perhaps forever. This urgency underlies Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City, Carolyn Tate's comprehensive catalog and analysis of all the city's extant buildings and sculptures.

Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians Vol. 53 No. 3, Se. 1994 (pp. 356-357) DOI: 1. 307/990946. Find this author on Google Scholar. This is a PDF-only article. The first page of the PDF of this article appears above.

The Maya City-State of Yaxchilan, founded in the 4th century, became one of the most powerful Mayan kingdoms during the Maya Classic . Carolyn Elaine Tate (1992). Yaxchilan: the design of a Maya ceremonial city. University of Texas Press. p. 306. ISBN 0-292-77041-3.

The Maya City-State of Yaxchilan, founded in the 4th century, became one of the most powerful Mayan kingdoms during the Maya Classic Period. During the height of its power the kings of Yaxchilan built gleaming temples, pyramids, and luxurious palaces clustered along the grand plaza extending along the shores of the wild Usumacinta River.

More than mere documentation, however, the book explores the phenomenon of art within Maya society. During a year of field work, Tate fully documented the appearance of the site as of 1987

This urgency underlies Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City, Carolyn Tate's comprehensive catalog and analysis of all the city's extant buildings and sculptures. Line drawings and photographs provide a visual document of the art and architecture of Yaxchilan.

Yaxchilán: a significant Maya center. Yaxchilán is located on the south bank of the Usumacinta River, in Chiapas, Mexico. Tate, Yaxchilan: the Design of a Maya Ceremonial City (Austin, University of Texas Press, 1992). It was a significant Maya center during the Classic period (2500 . and a number of its buildings stand to this day. Many of the exteriors had elaborate decorations, but it is the carved stone lintels above their doorways which have made this site famous. D. Freidel and L. Schele, A Forest of Kings: the Untold Story of the Ancient Maya (London, 1990). The British Museum logo.

As archaeologists peel away the jungle covering that has both obscured and preserved the ancient Maya cities of Mexico and Central America, other scholars have only a limited time to study and understand the sites before the jungle, weather, and human encroachment efface them again, perhaps forever. This urgency underlies Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City, Carolyn Tate's comprehensive catalog and analysis of all the city's extant buildings and sculptures.

During a year of field work, Tate fully documented the appearance of the site as of 1987. For each sculpture and building, she records its discovery, present location, condition, measurements, and astronomical orientation and reconstructs its Long Counts and Julian dates from Calendar Rounds. Line drawings and photographs provide a visual document of the art and architecture of Yaxchilan.

More than mere documentation, however, the book explores the phenomenon of art within Maya society. Tate establishes a general framework of cultural practices, spiritual beliefs, and knowledge likely to have been shared by eighth-century Maya people. The process of making public art is considered in relation to other modes of aesthetic expression, such as oral tradition and ritual. This kind of analysis is new in Maya studies and offers fresh insight into the function of these magnificent cities and the powerful role public art and architecture play in establishing cultural norms, in education in a semiliterate society, and in developing the personal and community identities of individuals.

Several chapters cover the specifics of art and iconography at Yaxchilan as a basis for examining the creation of the city in the Late Classic period. Individual sculptures are attributed to the hands of single artists and workshops, thus aiding in dating several of the monuments. The significance of headdresses, backracks, and other costume elements seen on monuments is tied to specific rituals and fashions, and influence from other sites is traced. These analyses lead to a history of the design of the city under the reigns of Shield Jaguar (A.D. 681-741) and Bird Jaguar IV (A.D. 752-772).

In Tate's view, Yaxchilan and other Maya cities were designed as both a theater for ritual activities and a nexus of public art and social structures that were crucial in defining the self within Maya society.

Ffan
Great book! perfect price value, good condition.
Wooden Purple Romeo
I hoped for more color, but the cover is a tease.. all black and white densely packed text pages and photos. The maps are good, but not all descriptions of specific artifacts are linked to either a photo or map.
Deorro
This book is nice because I love the Mayan city of Yaxchilan, and it is really difficult to visit. The book is more for academic/college than general reading. I would have preferred that the book include more photos.
Ionzar
If you have an interest in the details of the ancient Maya city of Yaxchilan, as I do, this book is an overflowing mine of sparkling diamonds. Tate has provided, in the second half, details of each building whose ruins and inscriptions have been found, with some black and white pictures to provide context, and proposed building dates. In addition there is a list of inscriptions by date and English 'translations' of the inscriptions as known by Mayan epigraphers in 1991. In the first half Tate provides an analysis of the elaborate and varied iconography of the monuments, how the iconic elements evolved over time. Possibly my favorite part is her analysis of the artists, the designs and techniques that identify them, and the monuments each potentially contributed to.

Put together, all this detail is a treasure-trove of information from which to imagine the life of the people of this city, living here in the eighth century CE and leaving their artistry and political propaganda for us to ponder. The glue that ties it together is to go to the ruins and walk amongst what is left of their buildings, climb their stairways, and sit on their benches listening to the monkeys and birds above you in the trees.
Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City ebook
Author:
Carolyn E. Tate
Category:
Architecture
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1639 kb
FB2 size:
1310 kb
DJVU size:
1948 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Texas Press; 1st edition (April 1, 1992)
Pages:
328 pages
Rating:
4.8
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