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Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear ebook

by Kimberly Smith


I have found the book Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear most informative, and I heartily recommend i. In this sequel to "Oh, Be Careful Little Ears," Smith further impales the heart of contemporary Christian music, then twists the stake.

In this sequel to "Oh, Be Careful Little Ears," Smith further impales the heart of contemporary Christian music, then twists the stake.

Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear continues the discussion started in the book, Oh, Be Careful Little Ears, with more thought-provoking insights.

Christian Standard Bible Let anyone who has ears listen. Webster's Bible Translation He that hath ears to hear, let him hear

Christian Standard Bible Let anyone who has ears listen. Webster's Bible Translation He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. Weymouth New Testament Listen, every one who has ears! World English Bible He who has ears to hear, let him hear. Young's Literal Translation he who is having ears to hear - let him hear. Jesus Testifies about Joh. 4And if you are willing to accept it, he is the Elijah who was to come.

For Him Who Has Ears to Hear is the debut release by contemporary Christian music pianist and singer Keith Green, It was released on May 20, 1977. The album photography was taken by Garry Heery with help from Max Blanc in the way of art direction. The album is ranked fifth on CCM Magazine's 100 Greatest Albums in Christian Music

I began to see that while things have gotten better, things also are demonstrably worse, I am ready to proclaim as Cone did with Black Power, that Black Lives Matter is the Gospel. Those who have ears, let them hear You can hear the podcast here

I began to see that while things have gotten better, things also are demonstrably worse, I am ready to proclaim as Cone did with Black Power, that Black Lives Matter is the Gospel. Those who have ears, let them hear You can hear the podcast here.

Author of Music And Morals, Oh, be careful little ears, God, the Angel And the Golden Butterfly, Let those who have ears to hear, Special needs resource guide. Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? Music And Morals. Oh, be careful little ears. God, the Angel And the Golden Butterfly. Let those who have ears to hear.

Tonight O finished reading Isak Dinesen's book "Out of Africa. I remember that horrific Friday afternoon; aa I was driving home from work, I remember getting that phone call from my mother telling me that she had cancer. It tells the story of a Kenyan tribesman "who appeared" at the door of the books heroine in Nairobi to ask for employment. She said yes and he turned out to be a marvelous servant. I remember having to pull off the road, and I remember feeling like the darkest cloud possible had wrapped itself around my family. A few days later, I remember hearing a dear friend tell me, It's all about the journey.

He who has ears to hear, let him hear. Julia Smith Translation. All who dwell on the earth will worship him, everyone whose name has not been written from the foundation of the world in the book of life of the Lamb who has been slain. He having ears to hear let him hear. Who has ears to hear, let him hear. Lexham Expanded Bible. The one who has ears, let him hear!" Modern King James verseion. He who has ears to hear, let him hear. Modern Spelling Tyndale-Coverdale. Whosoever hath ears to hear, let him hear.

Michael W Smith - Let it Rain - Продолжительность: 5:30 T1R9A6C3Y Recommended for you. 5:30. sunday solos Blackout // 1,150+ solo wins // old school cod player MinerHoboJo 3 495 зрителей.

Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear continues the discussion started in the book, Oh, Be Careful Little Ears, with more thought-provoking insights. For example... Did you know that secular rock musicians’ comments about the “beat” support the conclusion that it’s “musical pornography”? Did you know that rock music is purposely designed to appeal to our carnal self—regardless of the lyrics? Did you know that there are specific, identifiable musical techniques which “feed the flesh”? Did you know that contemporary Christian music (CCM) uses these same techniques? You will learn...when drums are “right”; when drums are “wrong”; how the term “contemporary music” applies throughout history and why CCM is different; steps to help you and your family begin to discern music; and much more. This book also gives solid, biblical answers to refute fifty common defenses(excuses) by proponents ofcontemporary Christian musicin the chapter, "What We Believe is Our Truth." Some of thestatements answered are: "People are saved at CCM concerts"; "The music makes me feel closer to God"; "Where in the Bible does it say a certain beat is wrong?"; "Psalm 33:3 says we're to sing 'a new song' to the Lord"; "It's all relative; everyone has his or her own tastes," and many more. Eight more chapters which discuss the adverse effects that CCM has had on the Church include: "The Voice of the Harlot," "Cool Is Not a Fruit of the Spirit," and "Where Do We Draw the Line?" Although written as a follow-upto Oh, Be Careful Little Ears, Let Those Who Have Earsstands alone, as well.
Doomredeemer
This is a fine piece of writing that engages the reader interested in the message as well as the melody of music. It does not stay on the fence but is decidedly pro traditional.
Zuser
Well-written book that perfectly articulates points from the Bible on music. Specifically writing about contemporary/rock music, and why we should think twice before listening to it. Would recommend this book to anyone.
Dibei
Nowhere is it easier to "put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter" (cf. Isaiah 5:20) than in music. Certainly this book and its prequel by Kimberly Smith (and some of the customer reviews written about both) prove the point. Even more do some customer reviews of certain other products.
Nevertheless, every reader of this book and other books of this genre needs to face the fact that music has what the Greeks called =ethos= or "moral force". Whether we =enjoy= how a specific style of music affects us or not is absolutely beside the point. Different elements of music, and different combinations of those elements, have specific and predictable effects on human beings, many of them now clinically measurable. There may be no disputing about taste, but taste is an unreliable guide of itself as to what is "good" in music. Nor may we look to style alone, for styles change from time to time and from culture to culture.
I believe the most important point Mrs. Smith makes is that music, and especially so-called sacred music, that provokes the carnal, sensual passions of human nature should be avoided. Those who claim to be Christians and yet perform or listen to music that defies the instructions given in Romans 13:11-14 and elsewhere (usually on the poor excuse that they =enjoy= music that stimulates such passions) are living in a fool's paradise. We must not confuse mere sensuality with spirituality, and Mrs. Smith gives (along with many direct answers to objections from CCM supporters) many straightforward, practical guidelines for ensuring that we do not. (Her tables on pages 183-184 give a useful, if somewhat simplistic, summary toward that end.)
This is not to say (as Mrs. Smith apparently does) that there are some things that are =inherently evil= in music. Medieval theorists rejected the dissonant tritone interval, whether melodic or harmonic, as "the devil in music". Mrs. Smith rejects the anapestic (weak-strong) rhythmic foot out of hand as likewise inherently evil (because its =constant repetition= is indeed sensual). But the original music of the Hebrew Bible -- to which she alludes very, very briefly while citing another publication that features it (p. 109 and footnote: "The Music of the Bible Revealed", sold elsewhere on Amazon.com) -- not only uses at times the tritone, but the Hebraic equivalent of the anapest, in order to bring out the meaning and expression of the words. Simply because our rock and rock-derived music ultimately draws its anapestic rhythms from African and Caribbean pagan music does not mean that the anapest, of itself, is evil. That would be simply ascribing guilt by association. The anapest, like the tritone, is merely =agitating= by nature -- and there are times when such agitation for effect is appropriate.
Moreover, not all styles of contemporary music are totally out of keeping with biblical example and principle. With appropriate revision, they can be used to Godly effect. In the words of one of my own Bible teachers: "Usually it is not the thing, but the =use= of the thing, that is good or evil." The moral force of music lies not in any one element, but in how those elements are combined and in what order. With that clarification, Mrs. Smith's thought-provoking and generally helpful book would be greatly improved.
Nern
I was given or loaned a copy of this book by a lady in a small conservative Baptist church that I have attended for about 3 years, and I find their notions about music as well as the author's very prudish and unrealistic. I love hymns, but let's face it, God created us to have emotions, and gave us music to cater to emotions and to help us better experience them. To deny this is to deny that we were given music by God, and indeed, music is one of the things that separates us from all other living beings on earth. I agree that anything done with no regard for God or with a fleshly attitude can be bad, but I see no correlation between drums, guitars and foot tapping and evil or even the flesh. We are a people who are saved by the precious blood of Jesus Christ, and as such, we should be joyful and elated, singing and even dancing in praise to Him! Why do we think He desires somber boring music and other worship expressions from us? I seriously doubt that heaven will be filled with a bunch of down in the mouth, robe wearing sad and somber people going about singing "oh God, thou art holy, snnnnoooozzee...." No, we will be jubilant and filled with eternal peace and satisfaction. If people prefer softer less rhythmic music, so be it, but don't quench the spirit of God. If God moves you to jump and sing loud, or if He gives you a talent like drumming or guitar, use it. I recently made a video about contemporary music that you might want to watch, [...]
Kage
In this sequel to "Oh, Be Careful Little Ears," Smith further impales the heart of contemporary Christian music, then twists the stake. In a broader crusade against the worldly appeal of Christian rock and other "carnal" music, she makes this observation: churches that embrace contemporary music are far more likely to develop casual attitudes about God and worship. Accordingly in such churches, a worship service is no different from "hanging out" at the local mall, where slovenly dressed people can meet with friends to have some "laughs" and hear some "tunes" (emphases mine).
The book's subtitle provides much pause for thought: "If They Took Away the Music...Would You Still Follow Jesus?" It implies that upbeat contemporary music is the principal factor (perhaps the only factor) which keeps people, especially teenagers, in today's "cool" churches. But to Smith, "'Cool' is not a fruit of the [Holy] Spirit."
Smith devotes a large segment of the book (71 pages) to crushing some 50 additional excuses which proponents of contemporary music have offered in defense.
This book, together with "Oh, Be Careful Little Ears," should more than sufficiently convince discerning Christians to reclaim biblically sound music for their worship services. This includes opposing many forms of contemporary music, most especially rock music.
These two books should be mandatory reading for Sunday school programs and youth groups.
Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear ebook
Author:
Kimberly Smith
Category:
Music
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1116 kb
FB2 size:
1535 kb
DJVU size:
1655 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Cappella Books (January 15, 2001)
Pages:
216 pages
Rating:
4.5
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