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How Sondheim Found His Sound ebook

by Steve Swayne


But Swayne has found a new angle, and in this scholarly tome, he examines the impact other artists and mediums have had on Sondheim's work.

But Swayne has found a new angle, and in this scholarly tome, he examines the impact other artists and mediums have had on Sondheim's work. My main complaint is that in a book called "How Sondheim Found His Sound", one would expect to find at least a mention of the orchestration in Sondheim's shows. Perhaps this is just my own personal bent, as I have always wondered just how Sondheim works with his orchestrators and to what extent he thinks in orchestral terms. In terms of the writing, this book (especially in the later chapters) all too often reads like an undergraduate music paper. All this being said, there's enough in here to warrant purchase by real Sondheim junkies.

Among the many forces influencing his work, Sondheim has readily pointed to a wide field: classical music from 1850 to 1950; the songs of Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and Hollywood; the theatrical innovations of Oscar Hammerstein II and his collaborators; the cinematic elements found in certain film schools; and the melodramatic style of particular plays and films

Steve Swayne'sHow Sondheim Found His Soundis a fascinating treatment and . com How he arrived at this unique appellation is the subject ofHow Sondheim Found His Sound-an absorbing study of the multitudinous influences o. .

Steve Swayne'sHow Sondheim Found His Soundis a fascinating treatment and remarkable analysis of America's greatest playwright in song. His marvelous text goes a long way toward placing Stephen Sondheim among the towering artists of the late twentieth century!" -Cornel West, Princeton University. What a fascinating book, full of insights large and small. An impressive analysis and summary of Sondheim's many sources of inspiration. How he arrived at this unique appellation is the subject ofHow Sondheim Found His Sound-an absorbing study of the multitudinous influences on Sondheim's work.

Swayne has lived richly within the world of Sondheim's music. -Richard Crawford, author of America's Musical Life: A History "Sondheim's career and music have never been so skillfully dissected, examined, and put in context. With its focus on his work as composer, this book is surprising and welcome.

Steven Swayne has found the middle way in Hcne Sondheim Found His Sound (University of Michigan Press, 2005) with his examination of the primary influences on Sondheim's music, offering academic references in a manner that even a musical neophyte can appreciate.

Swayne, Steve, 1957–. How Sondheim found his sound, Steve Swayne. 1949 All That Glitters (musical; book by Stephen Sondheim; Williams College). p. cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index. c. Bequest (novel; abandoned) Variations on a Theme (Katie Malone) for Piano.

How Sondheim Found His Sound, University of Michigan Press (2005; paperback . Dartmouth College entry. Download as PDF. Printable version.

How Sondheim Found His Sound, University of Michigan Press (2005; paperback, 2007), ISBN 978-0-472-03229-7.

Keywords: Ann, ISBN, Sondheim Found, XVI, Steve Swayne, Michigan Press. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Steve Swayne teaches courses in art music from 1700 to the present day, opera, American musical theater, Russian .

Steve Swayne teaches courses in art music from 1700 to the present day, opera, American musical theater, Russian music, and American music.

"The research is voluminous, as is the artistry and perceptiveness. Swayne has lived richly within the world of Sondheim's music."---Richard Crawford, author of America's Musical Life: A History"Sondheim's career and music have never been so skillfully dissected, examined, and put in context. With its focus on his work as composer, this book is surprising and welcome."---Theodore S. Chapin, President and Executive Director, The Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization"What a fascinating book, full of insights large and small. An impressive analysis and summary of Sondheim's many sources of inspiration. All fans of the composer and lovers of Broadway in general will treasure and frequently refer to Swayne's work."---Tom Riis, Joseph Negler Professor of Musicology and Director of the American Music Research Center, University of ColoradoStephen Sondheim has made it clear that he considers himself a "playwright in song." How he arrived at this unique appellation is the subject of How Sondheim Found His Sound---an absorbing study of the multitudinous influences on Sondheim's work.Taking Sondheim's own comments and music as a starting point, author Steve Swayne offers a biography of the artist's style, pulling aside the curtain on Sondheim's creative universe to reveal the many influences---from classical music to theater to film---that have established Sondheim as one of the greatest dramatic composers of the twentieth century.Sondheim has spoken often and freely about the music, theater, and films he likes, and on occasion has made explicit references to how past works crop up in his own work. He has also freely acknowledged his eclecticism, seeing in it neither a curse nor a blessing but a fact of his creative life.Among the many forces influencing his work, Sondheim has readily pointed to a wide field: classical music from 1850 to 1950; the songs of Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and Hollywood; the theatrical innovations of Oscar Hammerstein II and his collaborators; the cinematic elements found in certain film schools; and the melodramatic style of particular plays and films. Ultimately, Sondheim found his sound by amalgamating these seemingly disparate components into his unique patois.How Sondheim Found His Sound is the first book to provide an overview of his style and one of only a few to account for these various components, how they appear in Sondheim's work, and how they affect his musical and dramatic choices.
Berenn
Sir Isaac Newton once said: 'If I have accomplished anything, it is because I stood on the shoulders of giants.' Stephen Sondheim would probably say something similar.

He has acknowledged being influenced by classical music, Broadway, Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood and many more. In the end though, Sondheim's work has taken these together and produced something uniquely his own. The results speak for themselves: West Side Story, Gypsy, Sunday in the Park with George, Sweeney Todd, Into the Woods, Do I Hear a Waltz and the list goes on and on. In 2004 alone there was the first Broadway production of Assassins, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (London), The Frogs (Lincoln Center), Passion, Pacific Overtures.

This book though, is not a description of what he has done, it's an in depth analysis of the way his music came about. The author teaches music at Dartmouth. His analysis, aided by Sondheim himself talks not only about the origins of music, but the way Sondheim goes about developing a song. It's a fascinating look at the creative process.
HappyLove
This book got off to a good start, analyzing Sondheim's favorite classical composers and how they show up in his own musical language. The next chapter is devoted to Sondheim's broadway influences, and gives a good examination of these as well.

The second half of the book is devoted to Sondheim's theatrical and cinematic influences. It is here that Swayne goes off track. Though he makes some interesting connections between film technique and musical composition, it seems to me that this is where his thesis falls short, and could have been developed much more cogently. Also, one would think that Swayne would devote more attention to actual film scores.

My main complaint is that in a book called "How Sondheim Found His Sound", one would expect to find at least a mention of the orchestration in Sondheim's shows. Perhaps this is just my own personal bent, as I have always wondered just how Sondheim works with his orchestrators and to what extent he thinks in orchestral terms.

In terms of the writing, this book (especially in the later chapters) all too often reads like an undergraduate music paper. All this being said, there's enough in here to warrant purchase by real Sondheim junkies.
Steep
"How Sondheim Found his Sound" is a book full of very interesting information, although my reasoning for allocating only 4-stars is because I feel that more musical examples could have been used.

That having been said, it is a very thouroughly researched book, and I would recommend it to Sondheim fans, myself included.

One last note would be that having the vocal scores in question along side this book would allow a person to garner more of an understanding of the analyses (due to the general lack of musical examples).
Lightwind
This is a great book on how Sondheim "found his sound." I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Sondheim's card system and it gave me greater insight into a person who knew Leonard Bernstein.
FailCrew
To the writer: For whom was this book written? Who was the intended audience? What's with the "thesaurus" words peppering the text? Why all the conjecture? Why not just ask the composer? This is a treatise I'd hand back to the student for major rewriting.
How Sondheim Found His Sound ebook
Author:
Steve Swayne
Category:
Performing Arts
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1747 kb
FB2 size:
1867 kb
DJVU size:
1908 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press; New Ed edition (May 8, 2007)
Pages:
336 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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