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The Language of the Land: Living Among the Hadzabe in Africa ebook

by James Stephenson


uccumbing to what he calls ''mal Afrique,'' or the need to return to Africa, in 1997 James Stephenson suspended his career as a terrace gardener in New York to spend nine months in Tanzania among the Hadzabe, ''perhaps the last hunter-gatherers living a traditional life in Africa.

James Stephenson combines an extarodinary adventure with a poetic sensibility in this work that is rare indeed.

In 1997 James Stephenson arranged to have almost a full year free, a year he wanted to spend among the Hadzabe in East Africa. He had visited these people several times previously and with every trip his fascination with them deepened, for the Hadzabe are the last hunters and gatherers still living a traditional life in Africa.

At the age of twenty-two, James Stephenson arranged to spend a year living among the Hadzabe, the last hunters and gatherers still living a traditional life in Africa. He wanted to live their life, hunting what they hunted, eating what they ate, participating in their dances and ceremonies, consulting with their medicine men, and learning their myths and dreams. Armed only At the age of twenty-two, James Stephenson arranged to spend a year living among the Hadzabe, the last hunters and gatherers still living a traditional life in Africa.

In l997 James Stephenson arranged to have almost a full year free, a year he wanted to spend among the Hadzabe in. .

In l997 James Stephenson arranged to have almost a full year free, a year he wanted to spend among the Hadzabe in East Africa. He had visited these people several times previously and with every trip his fascination with them deepened, for the Hadzabe are the last hunters and gatherers still A rare adventure with the last Stone Age hunting and gathering tribe in Africa. In l997 James Stephenson arranged to have almost a full year free, a year he wanted to spend among the Hadzabe in East Africa.

James Stephenson African Art Publications. Living Among the Hadzabe in Africa. In 1997 James Stephenson arranged to have a full year free to spend among the Hadzabe in east Africa. James Stephenson St. Martins Press ISBN 0-312-24107-0. He had visited these people several times previously and with every trip his fascination with them deepened, for the Hadzabe are the last hunters and gathers still living a traditional life in Africa.

Living Among the Hadzabe in Africa. At the age of 27, Stephenson intended to spend the year living among the Hadzabe, and, more importantly, living their life, hunting what they hunted, eating what they ate, participating in their dances and ceremonies, consulting with their medicine men and learning their myths and dreams. Armed only with his camera, his art supplies and the open-hearted courage of youth, he set out to visit with a people who have changed little since the Stone Age. He wanted to glimpse the world as they perceived it and learn the wisdom they had wrestled from the land.

August 4, 2010 History. 1st ed. by Stephenson, James. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published 2000 by St. Martin's Press in New York.

A rare adventure with the last Stone Age hunting and gathering tribe in Africa.In l997 James Stephenson arranged to have almost a full year free, a year he wanted to spend among the Hadzabe in East Africa. He had visited these people several times previously and with every trip his fascination with them deepened, for the Hadzabe are the last hunters and gatherers still living a traditional life in Africa.At the age of 27, Stephenson intended to spend the year living among the Hadzabe, and, more importantly, living their life, hunting what they hunted, eating what they ate, participating in their dances and ceremonies, consulting with their medicine men and learning their myths and dreams.Armed only with his camera, his art supplies and the open-hearted courage of youth, he set out to visit with a people who have changed little since the Stone Age. He wanted to glimpse the world as they perceived it and learn the wisdom they had wrestled from the land. This account of his adventure and what he learned is travel writing at its best, reminiscent of the books of Peter Beard and Bruce Chatwin.
kolos
One of my favorite accounts of Africa, this is a book to re-read every year. Fortunately, teaching part of the book in a college setting encourages me to set aside time to re-encounter James Stephenson's hunting with the Hadzabe (now easily available in the Kindle version). A painterly eye for details, a cast of fully-drawn people, and encounters with a life as far from the writer's NYC as I can imagine beckon to us from the earliest pages. Perhaps the single most potent chapter for me is "The Mountain of Nudulungu and the Ancestor Spirits." It is adventure and discovery writing at its most potent, filled with the possibility of being smashed by a buffalo in the night, clawed by a lion, or offending a spirit--all later delivering a vision of birth, life and death impossible to forget. Inside this book we see a man come to Africa with wounds, and a quest changes him. Still it is not an solemn reading experience, either: there is plenty of humor in his real-life storytelling, too. James Stephenson's prose wins me over every time, helping me forget for a time who and where I am, and it might just be the most impressive African work I teach. May you savor this sojourn as much as I do every year.
Fordregelv
An amazing story and told in a way that develops much more insight and awareness than anthropology. Having become gradually more and more immersed in Native American world views over the past view years I find it life affirming how similar are indigenous viewpoints throughout the world.
Gholbithris
Eat your heart out, D. H. Lawrence. Here is a young man who has lived the primitive life you extolled-- and writes about it like a dream. We Westerners are guilty of dismissing and destroying cultures we consider uncivilized, but the so-called primitive life also fascinates us. We see in it an unforced spirituality, and a deeper sense of communion with both nature and tribe--all the values we left behind in our race for more and bigger agriculture.
Our ambivalence toward these emotions--what Marianna Torgovnick, professor and chair of the English department at Duke University, and author of "Primitive Passions" has called the "the sensation of merging with the universe"--is at the root of our fascination with the primitive. As D. H. Lawrence expressed it: "the human race is . . . like a great uprooted tree, with its roots in the air. We must plant ourselves again in the universe."
This is what James Stephenson does. At age twenty-seven, this artist and landscape-builder wandered off into the African bush with little more than his paints and a pocketful of plastic snakes and spiders that his mother gave him (for practical jokes and to fend off beggars). He had visited the Hadzabe several times before, and intended to spend a year eating, drinking, hunting, and dreaming with them.
He writes about the Hadzabe as though he had lived in a state of total realization with them. Somehow he managed to short-circuit all of the fears that would have kept me from abandoning the safety and comfort of civilization. But he also admits to the danger of becoming a free, primal man: "The mental discipline that makes one restrain his/her action in the present...was no longer functioning properly..." 'Future' was only a concept. He was no longer concerned about AIDS and sought multiple women for sexual pleasure. He went on drinking binges with his companions. He slept on the ground, endured mudslides, stinging insects, parasites, bad water and baby starlings for breakfast. Creatively, he was on fire.
There is a hallucinatory quality in the images that this author employs, especially on his hunting trips with the Hadzabe men. He was also taken on two, longer journeys of the spirit to search for the mountain of Nudulungu (the Hadzabe Christ figure) and to pay homage to the rock paintings of the Hadzabe ancestors. These two journeys are the heart of this book, and also the heart of the Hadzabe, one of Africa's vanishing tribes who still live off of the land and the forest without the benefit (and curse) of agriculture.
There are probably more elephants in Africa today than there are hunter-gatherers.
One of the ironies of this book is that it is the Hadzabe who feed their farmer-neighbors in times of drought and famine and not the other way around.
The author rarely resorts to anger or irony, but "The Language of the Land" is an elegy. His Hadzabe companions are brought to vivid life within the pages of this book, but even they know that they're probably the last of the men who will live in balance with the other life of the great African forests and savannahs.
Mightdragon
Stephenson, a 27 year old landscaper from New York, spends 9 months with the Hadzabe tribe south of the Serengeti.. He describes this experience in a very honest way, and so we learn about these hunters in the bush: their dreams, their spirits, their hunting, their daily life and their families. It is a well rounded picture. He loves these gentle people and finds peace and quiet with them. But he admits that he never learned their language and, of course, he always has his return ticket to New York.
To call this adventure a retrogression in time towards stone age people would be quite wrong. The Hadzabe are well connected to civilization. They drive by car to the local hospital. They steal radios. They sell their hunting trophies for money, go to the village bar and get stoned on pombe. They wear western clothes and hunt at night with a flashlight. But they prefer their life in the bush, and that is the difference.
The book has many pictures and drawings. It is a nice adventure story.
Inerrace
I owe James Stephenson a mighty big thank you. He gave me an all-expenses paid trip to Africa, and he's willing to give you one, too. No, he's not chartering planes for random winners of some unknown sweepstake. In this sometimes landscape artist, sometimes explorer's wonderful book, The Language of the Land: Living Among the Hadzabe in Africa, he shares the experiences of his life for nearly a year when he plunged into the jungle of East Africa and lived among the Hadzabe. Often mystical, Stephenson's adventure stems from joining with these hunters as they live, sharing in their ceremonies, following their rules.
The Language of the Land burgeons with fascinating photos. I finished the book feeling like I knew the people and the land, not only because of the tale that kept me from putting the book down until I finished it, but also because of the pictures that I studied, mesmerized. As an unexpected bonus, a portfolio of paintings by Stephenson and the Hadzabe awaits the reader in the back of the book.
I received The Language of the Land as a gift from a thoughtful friend who knows that I am anxious for the day when I can visit Africa to smell the air there and learn about the world that I imagine to be so different from my own. This book both teased me, increasing my desire to see Africa, and appeased me, satisfying, if only temporarily, my longing for adventure.
The Language of the Land: Living Among the Hadzabe in Africa ebook
Author:
James Stephenson
Category:
Photography & Video
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1364 kb
FB2 size:
1211 kb
DJVU size:
1176 kb
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Publisher:
St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (September 15, 2000)
Pages:
224 pages
Rating:
4.9
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