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Living to Tell the Tale ebook

by Gabriel García Márquez,Edith Grossman


Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Living to tell the tale. Chapter 8. Penguin books.

Gabriel Garcia Marquez. A treasure trove, a discovery of a lost land we knew existed but couldn't find. A thrilling miracle of a book' The Times. Marquez's greatest book. Puts itself beyond category: fiction, nonfiction, fantasy, memoir, poetry, drama. As a reading experience it is completely magical' Observer.

Gabriel García Márquez was born in Colombia in 1927. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982. The book actually loses some of its' impact once he does become a reporter (about 2/3's of the way into the book). We switch from the interpersonal to the events of the day. He is the author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including One Hundred Years of Solitude, Love In The Time Cholera, The Autumn Of The Patriarch, The General In His Labyrinth, and News Of A Kidnapping. However, the positive side is that Garcia Marquez was often an eye-witness to the major events in the Columbia of his youth. All in all this is a tremendous work by a very gifted author.

Living to Tell the Tale tells the story of García Márquez' life from 1927 through 1950, ending with his proposal to his wife.

Chapter 8. Gabriel García Márquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927. A treasure trove, a discovery of a lost land we knew existed but couldn’t find. A thrilling miracle of a book’ The Times. Márquez’s greatest book. As a reading experience it is completely magical’ Observer. He studied at the University of Bogotá and later worked as a reporter for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador and as a foreign correspondent in Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Caracas and New York.

Like all his work, Living to Tell the Tale is a magnificent piece of writing

Part of Vintage International. Like all his work, Living to Tell the Tale is a magnificent piece of writing. It spans Gabriel García Márquez’s life from his birth in 1927 through the start of his career as a writer to the moment in the 1950s when he proposed to the woman who would become his wife.

Living to Tell the Tale. Life is not what one lived, but what one remembers and how one remembers it writes Gabriel García Márquez in this book of memories of his childhood and youth

Living to Tell the Tale. Life is not what one lived, but what one remembers and how one remembers it writes Gabriel García Márquez in this book of memories of his childhood and youth. In this novel of a life, the author brings life to the characters and stories that populated his work, the magical world of his home town of Aracataca, his training in journalism, the tribulations of his family, the discovery of literature, and the beginnings of his own writing

Here is García Márquez’s shimmering evocation of his childhood home of Aracataca, the basis of the .

Here is García Márquez’s shimmering evocation of his childhood home of Aracataca, the basis of the fictional Macondo. Here are the members of his ebulliently eccentric family. Here are the forces that turned him into a writer. Warm, revealing, abounding in images so vivid that we seem to be remembering them ourselves, Living to Tell the Tale is a work of enchantment.

Living to Tell the Tale tells the story of García Márquez' life from 1927 through 1950, ending with his proposal to his wife

rising tales of everyday life: smugglers, bagpipers, the President and Pope at the funeral of Macondo’s revered matriarch; a very old angel with enormous wings. Teeming with the magical oddities for which his novels are loved, Márquez’s stories are a delight. MoreLess Show More Show Less. Gabriel García Márquez. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

No writer of his time exerted the magical appeal of Gabriel García Márquez. In this long-awaited autobiography, the great Nobel laureate tells the story of his life from his birth in1927 to the moment in the 1950s when he proposed to his wife. The result is as spectacular as his finest fiction. Here is García Márquez’s shimmering evocation of his childhood home of Aracataca, the basis of the fictional Macondo. Here are the members of his ebulliently eccentric family. Here are the forces that turned him into a writer. Warm, revealing, abounding in images so vivid that we seem to be remembering them ourselves, Living to Tell the Taleis a work of enchantment.

Wenes
The best thing about this book is discovering the story behind the stories in his other work. Stories involving his family, specially his mother, are the most interesting, but you will learn about his siblings and papa also. Chapters about his student days are also interesting but his life as a reporter and editorial writer lack the intimate details much of the time. He moves back and forth between Bogata and several other Colombian towns and is sometimes confusing. The ongoing civil wars make up much of the background. My feeling is that the biography of Marquez by another author will provide a more organized account of his life. He says very little about his future wife and it is not explained when they married. The story ends somewhat abruptly when he leaves Columbia for Switzerland.
Erennge
Gabriel Garcia Marquez was a masterful story-teller. This book relates the early half of his life in the time-bending style made famous in his fiction. His life story is interwoven with accounts of revolutions, dictatorships, and counter-coups of Colombia in terms of the impact they had on his childhood, education, and work as a journalist. Central to everything is his love of poetry, and the fierce grip that poetry had on the young intelligentsia of his time. His encounters with lust and with true love bring real passion to the work. I found this book so fascinating that I bought this copy for a friend who had recently "discovered" Marquez and fallen in love with his work.
Ynneig
"Living to tell the Tale" is an autobiography of the first 25-30 years of the life of the Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez. I was impressed just several pages into the book with the realization that this is not like any other autobiography (or regular biography) that I have read. This is a gifted author trying in words to make sense out of his life. That's not to imply that the author is finding out who he is right along with the rest of us. Rather, it is the author reliving those years with the ability to diagram the important events of his life no matter how meaningless they may have seemed at the time. One of the aspects that makes this book so impressive is that the author has led, from the beginning, a very interesting life. He was born into a poverty that had just enough of an income to give him the educational opportunities to discover his talents. Easily distracted by the here and now, Garcia Marquez had many chances to go irretrievibly astry. Yet these chances also introduced him to many people and places that would be the subjects of his writings. Clearly though, the most influencial people were his family; especially his mother and grandfather. Along the way we see the seeds (and, in some cases, fruition) of virtually every one of his books with the exception of "Clandestine in Chile" and "News of a Kidnapping". We watch the young man grow and mature into a socially and politically conscious reporter. Every step of the way is brought to us so intimately by the author that we feel as if we are sitting silently at the same table as he. All of this is more impressive when considering that the author's previous works of non-fiction are, in my opinion, of a lesser quality than his fiction. In the others, he was writing as a reporter. In "Living to Tell the Tale" he comes across as a tour guide of his life. The book actually loses some of its' impact once he does become a reporter (about 2/3's of the way into the book). We switch from the interpersonal to the events of the day. However, the positive side is that Garcia Marquez was often an eye-witness to the major events in the Columbia of his youth.

All in all this is a tremendous work by a very gifted author. My favorite book of his is "Love in the Time of Cholera". This one is a close second.
Broadraven
One advantage of writing an autobiography is that you obviously control what the reader finds out about you. I suspect that Mr. Marquez omits many things about himself in this wonderful, rambling memoir of nearly 500 pages; but he gives us story after story on practically every page; and we do get a myriad of fascinating details about both the man, his family and friends and his thoughts on writers and writing. Marquez comes from a large Colombian family, both in and outside marriage, and says that he owes his nature and "way of thinking" to the women in his family who had "strong characters and tender hearts." His mother obviously fits this description. Although intensely jealous of her husband's infidelities, she brings home one of her husband's children born outside their marriage because "'the same blood that's in my children's veins just can't go wandering around out there.'" In addition to Marguez's parents, whom we recognize in LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA, there are countless other fascinating people and stories seen and told through the eyes of this great writer. Who else, for example, would know a blind accordian repairman? Or whose family would dig up the remains of Marquez's grandmother Tranquilina and transport her in a sack when they make one of their many moves? It is any wonder that Marquez loved Faulkner's AS I LAY DYING?
On writers and writing-- Marquez has always loved poetry and believes that the short story is superior to the novel, this from a man who has given the world ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE and LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA. It is not surprising that he prefers the feature story to an interview or straight reporting. Marquez readily admits that dialogue is not his forte. (We'll gladly settle for his magical tales, however.) He would agree that good readers make good writers as he has read everyone. Writers in English include D. H Lawrence, Graham Greene, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, Virginia Woolf, Aldous Huxley, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, John Steinbeck, Erskine Caldwell, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne et al. Hawthorne's THE HOUSE OF THE SEVEN GABLES "marked" him for life. Upon discovering that a wooden crate that arrived one morning was filled with books, he writes: "My heart leaded up before I did. . . The first thing I did was to display the books on the table in the dining room while my mother finished clearing away the breakfast dishes." He goes on to "smell" them as he says he always does with new books.
Of course this volume is chockfull of sparse, wondrous descriptions. Drugs create an "artificial paradise." A man at an "all-night haunt" is "an Adonois-like man in his sixties." The moon is a "cold plate in the sky." Someone wears a "merinque-white uniform." Another person's hair was so unruly, that it "looked borrowed." An old man has a "maternal belly."
This volume is the first of a trilogy. We certainly hope that Mr. Marquez lives to finish his marvelous tale.
Ochach
The most engaging portions fo Marquez autobiography are those parallel to the village tales of A Hundred Years of Solitude, that is, his childhood memories, interactions with his mother, and the settings for both. When he grows into a world of journalists yakking over bar stools, the pace slows and your interest fades.
Living to Tell the Tale ebook
Author:
Gabriel García Márquez,Edith Grossman
Category:
Arts & Literature
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1840 kb
FB2 size:
1106 kb
DJVU size:
1138 kb
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Publisher:
Vintage; Reprint edition (October 12, 2004)
Pages:
533 pages
Rating:
4.5
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