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A Hoosier holiday ebook

by Theodore Dreiser


by. Dreiser, Theodore, 1871-1945; Booth, Franklin, 1874-1948; Rogers, Bruce, 1870-1957, former owner.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. by. DLC; Cohen, Roger . former owner. DLC; Tobriner, Walter Nathan, 1902-1979, donor. DLC; Skiff, Frederick . 1868-1947, former owner.

A Hoosier Holiday book. It takes a patient reader to understand Indiana native Theodore Dreiser. I would recommend the book to an enthusiast of the "road novel. Most people think of Jack Kerouac, but A Hoosier Holiday pre-dated "On the Road" by at least 40 years.

Author Dreiser, Theodore, 1871-1945. Categories: Nonfiction. Hey Rub-a-Dub-Dub : a book of the Mystery. 10 24. Books by Dreiser, Theodore, 1871-1945: Life, Art And America. 10, 10. A Hoosier Holiday. A Traveler At Forty. 9, 10. A book About Myself. 8, 10. The Hand of the Potter.

Dreiser was a committed socialist and wrote several nonfiction books on political issues. A Hoosier Holiday (1916). Twelve Men (New York: Boni & Liveright, 1919). He praised the Soviet Union under Stalin during the Great Terror and the nonaggression pact with Hitler.

Theodore Dreiser, road warrior. Because provides a portrait of the artist as a young man and describes the nation as a mosaic of individual cultures, Dreiser's journey offers several different lessons. A hoosier holiday (1916) grew out of an August 1915 party given by novelist Theodore Dreiser, the author of Sister Carrie (1900), in uptown Manhattan to honor Edgar Lee Masters, who that spring had awakened the literary community with the publication of Spoon River Anthology, a bestselling volume of poetry.

In that, as in so much else in this book, as in the great body of all his work, Dreiser in his earnest, heartfelt, clumsy way speaks to the universal experience. He had not been back to his home state in over 20 years.

A Hoosier Holiday (1916 . .has been added to your Cart. In the summer of 1915, at a party in NYC for Edgar Lee Masters, illustrator Franklin Booth, a fellow Hoosier, asked Dreiser if he would care to accompany him on a motor trip to Indiana

A Hoosier Holiday (1916 . In the summer of 1915, at a party in NYC for Edgar Lee Masters, illustrator Franklin Booth, a fellow Hoosier, asked Dreiser if he would care to accompany him on a motor trip to Indiana. Sensing the possibility of making a book out of the trip, Dreiser agreed. On August 11, Dreiser and Booth, along with a driver/mechanic named Speed, left NYC for the great midwest of their childhoods. This, the book that resulted from the trip, is many things: travelogue, personal memoir, soap box for Dreiser's unorthodox beliefs, among other things.

Theodore Dreiser, novelist who was the outstanding American practitioner of naturalism. He was the leading figure in a national literary movement that replaced the observance of Victorian notions of propriety with the unflinching presentation of real-life subject matter. Theodore Dreiser, (born Aug. 27, 1871, Terre Haute, In. died Dec. 28, 1945, Hollywood, Calif. novelist who was the outstanding American practitioner of naturalism.

In the summer of 1915, at a party in NYC for Edgar Lee Masters, illustrator Franklin Booth, a fellow Hoosier, asked Dreiser if he would care to accompany him on a motor trip to Indiana.

6snake6
One of the best books that I have read. A sheer joy. Every American should read this book, and rejoice the knowledge that they live in a great country, so enlivened with the character and industry of so many small towns and people.
Theodore Dreiser brings everything to life in a celebration of being American. Yes, you CAN go home and celebrate the poignancy of a childhood re-visited.
Steelrunner
Drieser is an interesting guy, not really a good writer, but a good story-teller. This is a non-fiction narrative and he's just not smart enough to be interesting when he's observing his real-life surroundings.
Gavidor
Slow moving, but worthwhile as he describes traveling through states in detail in the early 1900's. loved the hometown IN descriptions!
Nirad
we live in Indiana. bought this for my wife. she said it was very interesting. looks like a self published book. quaint.
Stonewing
bought this for my indiana boyfriend to give to an indiana senior citizen he works with--they both attended the same grammer school, 60 years apart. We read aloud to each other--I'm charmed by Dreiser's writing and delighted with this historical account of motoring across the country in the days way before the interstates!
Whitebinder
Theodore Dreiser is one of America's great authors, but he is also an enigma wrapped inside a contradiction. Forever in awe of the "great social forces" lurching mankind forward, and inspired by the great financial titans and clever capitalist geniuses who attempted to reap the whirlwind, Dreiser nevertheless embraced communism late in his life as the antidote for the injustices plaguing mankind. He was a spirited social rebel, railing against orthodoxy and Puritan "Babbitts" who would foist their Midwestern morality down upon him, but at the same time, as he demonstrates in this book, his idealization of the small-town Hoosier philistines in Warsaw, Sullivan, and other whistle stop towns far removed from the Broadway footlights he had known intimately by the time this epic journey to the Heartland commences. Dreiser devoted hundreds, perhaps thousands of pages of prose to attacking the small-town "Babbitts" sharing the views of another world-weary cynic, Henry Louis Mencken. And yet, for all his caustic attitudes toward rigid conventions, Dreiser swoons in near reverie after catching first glimpse of the mundane streets, the old grammar school, feed store, and the simple folk he remembered from his youth. In other passages,examples of plain country living he encounters along the bumpy, dusty backroads of America circa 1914, are ridiculed and scorned as one would commonly expect of Theodore Dreiser and his war against society's religious and social conventions. Nevertheless, Dreiser's personal observations on life are often more engaging and inciteful than in some of his later novels. He is an American master; a pioneer of literary realism, and despite the contradictions, this is a fine and engaging volume exploring a vanished American landscape. Mr. Brinkley is to be commended for presenting it to the reading public again after all these years.
Quashant
In the summer of 1915, at a party in NYC for Edgar Lee Masters, illustrator Franklin Booth, a fellow Hoosier, asked Dreiser if he would care to accompany him on a motor trip to Indiana. Sensing the possibility of making a book out of the trip, Dreiser agreed. On August 11, Dreiser and Booth, along with a driver/mechanic named Speed, left NYC for the great midwest of their childhoods.

This, the book that resulted from the trip, is many things: travelogue, personal memoir, soap box for Dreiser's unorthodox beliefs, among other things. As a travelogue, it's relatively easy to trace their journey almost town to town (no maps are in the book) because Dreiser names many of them; he is also impressed by a lot of them and seems to be consistently enthused about what might be around the next bend. The year being 1915, one might assume they would've taken the newly established Lincoln Highway, but they didn't, electing to go via a more circuitous route through Scranton, Elmira, and Buffalo. Dreiser is obviously thrilled by motor travel and waxes ecstatically about it throughout the trip.

After reaching Indiana and visiting some old familiar places, Dreiser's comments are sometimes cynical and critical (especially of small-town attitudes and prejudices), but are also enthusiastic and proud (he has a Whitmanesque belief in the American people). But the reader must also endure sentences like these: "I often ask myself what it is all about, anyhow, and what are we here for, and why should anyone worry whether they are low or high, or moral or immoral. What difference does it really make?" Expressing sentiments like these is what kept Dreiser in trouble with the critics.

All in all, it's a very interesting book. Dreiser's muscular prose pulls the reader along, and most of what he has to say is still relevant. The only thing sorely missing is an index, which would be very helpful. Like all long car trips there are slow, dreary stretches, but not nearly enough to wish you stayed home.
I read Sister Carrie when I was a teenager in China. The other day I listened to a Hoosier's holiday on Talking Books. He went back to his hometown after some thirty years. I went back to my hometown, Hangzhou, China and saw my old house now completely destroyed and replaced by a huge scaffolding. Somehow I felt my experience wasn't so different from Dreisers. I liked the book so much I'm going to order a copy to read certain parts again, although I have been in Indianapolis exactly once in my lifetime. Indianapolis and Hangzhou are world's apart. Dreiser and me are only 50 years apart but I feel I knew how he felt. Kai Lai Chung
A Hoosier holiday ebook
Author:
Theodore Dreiser
Category:
Arts & Literature
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1926 kb
FB2 size:
1447 kb
DJVU size:
1106 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Greenwood Press (1974)
Pages:
513 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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