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Letters of James Agee to Father Flye ebook

by James Agee


There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher. Though Agee was just ten, the two struck up an unlikely and enduring friendship, traveling Europe by bicycle and exchanging letters for thirty years, from Agee's admission to Exeter Academy to his death at forty-five.

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher. Though Agee was just ten, the two struck up an unlikely and enduring friendship, traveling Europe by bicycle and exchanging letters for thirty years, from Agee’s admission to Exeter Academy to his death at forty-five.

James Rufus Agee (/ˈeɪdʒiː/ AY-jee; November 27, 1909 – May 16, 1955) was an American novelist, journalist, poet, screenwriter and film critic. In the 1940s, he was one of the most influential film critics in the . His autobiographical novel, A Death in the Family (1957), won the author a posthumous 1958 Pulitzer Prize

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher. Though Agee was just ten, the two struck up an unlikely and enduring friendship, traveling Europe by bicycle and exchanging letters for thirty years, from Agees admission to Exeter Academy to his death at forty-five.

Praise for Letters of James Agee to Father Flye. work continues to feel so vital just because it remains so nakedly vulnerable, so provisional, so utterly lacking in that subtle artistic poison of self-confident complacency. Comparable in importance to Fitzgerald’s The Crack-Up and Thomas Wolfe’s letters as a self portrait of the artist in the modern scene. He honestly does seem something close to the James Dean of American literature. Michael Dirda, The Washington Post.

James Agee is now largely forgotten outside of film studies, but he remains an impressive writer by any standard and everything he touched conveys his particularly acute commitment and wide-ranging ambitions. This collection of letters, first published in 1962, trace a remarkable, long (nearly 30 years long) deeply involved correspondence between Agee and a sympathetic Father Flye, met when Agee was not yet 16. Beginning with a letter written at fifteen in 1925, the letters run right up to May 1955 and Agee's death.

Melville House Books.

Melville House is an independent publisher located in Brooklyn, New York. It was founded in 2001 by sculptor Valerie Merians and fiction writer/journalist Dennis Johnson. Melville House Books. Books & Magazines.

ark:/13960/t47q03f68.

There, Agee met Father James Harold Flye, who would become his history teacher. Praise for Letters of James Agee to Father Flye. Comparable in importance to Fitzgerald's The Crack-Up and Thomas Wolfe's letters as a self portrait of the artist in the modern scene. -Atlanta Constitution "The stuff of life.

Includes a preface and previously unpublished letters by Father Flye.
blac wolf
I only recently learned of this book through reading another book, MEMORABLE DAYS, a collection of letters between James Salter and Robert Phelps, who wrote the Foreword to this book. Prior to this, the only Agee book I was familiar with was his Pulitzer-winning novel, A DEATH IN THE FAMILY, which I read many years ago, but I can still remember what a profound effect it had on me, both its subject and its style. (It was also adapted into a fine film.)

These letters to Father Flye, an Episcopalian Priest who was Agee's teacher at St Andrew's in Tennessee, are very much a mixed bag. Written over a period of thirty years, from the 1920s into the 50s (Agee died in 1955), they are very revealing about Agee, first as an adolescent, at Philips Exeter Academy; then a young man at Harvard, and at work in NYC as a salaried writer for the Time syndicate; and finally a middle-aged man with a badly damaged heart. I enjoyed the earliest letters the most by far. The teenager's enthusiasm for books and writing was over-the-top contagious. I found myself making notes of the books he was reading and telling Father Flye about: the novels of Sinclair Lewis, Dos Passos, Dreiser, Booth Tarkington, Edith Wharton and H. Ryder Haggard; poetry by Whitman and Housman; Hemingway's first books; other authors nearly forgotten now, like Jim Tulley, Rose Macaulay, and Elizabeth Madox Roberts. Agee was obviously a young man drunk on the books and writers of his day.

The middle period of these letters, written by a man who felt tied down by the tedium of his writing assignments at Fortune and other magazines, began to show the signs of manic-depression. Some of these letters are rants. Others speak of suicidal thoughts. Indeed, as Agee grew older, he understood himself to be a "melancholic," but rejected getting professional help. His personal life too fluctuated. Married three times and father to four children, there are only very minimal mentions of wives or children. Agee seemed a man very centered on himself. In one letter from 1950 he tosses in a casual, "I can't remember for sure whether I've told you that we were expecting a baby; she was born late Monday evening ..." In fact there had been no mention of this third child in any previous letters; references to his children are extremely minimal throughout these years. His fourth child was born only months before Agee died, and is never mentioned at all. But by then, Agee has been plagued with multiple coronary episodes, sometimes 6-12 per day, controlled by sedatives and nitro pills. These last letters are pitiable in that Agee continued to make plans for further writing projects, for films, articles, etc., even though he had to have known he was dying.

Once again, some of these letters were fascinating, some mundane with multiple complaints about his work and musings about politics, world affairs and religion. Others were near unintelligible manic rants. But there are traces here too of the genius that flowered in Agee's great novel, A DEATH IN THE FAMILY, which was published two years after Agee's death.

It was interesting to learn of Agee's work as a screenwriter in Hollywood - THE AFRICAN QUEEN and NIGHT OF THE HUNTER - and his collaboration with Huston and friendship with Chaplin. I'm glad to have read these letters, which have left me with a strong urge to go back and re-read the aforementioned novel, and maybe his earlier novella, THE MORNING WATCH, a kind of prequel. I will recommend this book for Agee fans and students of American Lit.

- Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER
Shou
James Agee tells it all from his teens on to his death. He was and could have been even more the great artist, but life overwhelmed him. All young people with aspirations should read and re-read these letters. I read them in my late 20s and am enjoying them equally in my 60s.
Katius
Super supplement to the book, FATHER FLYE. I am closely connected to the school, St. Andrews, which brought these intellectual giants together.
RUL
Terrific background for an otherwise "unsituated" writer!
Qag
Not much here of substance, and Agee is extremely pretentious in his attempts at nuanced thought. There's a lot of "look forward to seeing you and Mrs. Flye" at Christmas, and "I met the nicest fellow. . ." And some pretentious observations on poetry and how he is desperately trying to approximate this and that. His film criticism is also very much in this vein -- it's all about him and his pretensions and less about the subject matter. He tends to write "around" things rather than about them, with an air of know-it-all disdain.
Weetont
James Agee is now largely forgotten outside of film studies, but he remains an impressive writer by any standard and everything he touched conveys his particularly acute commitment and wide-ranging ambitions.
This collection of letters, first published in 1962, trace a remarkable, long (nearly 30 years long) deeply involved correspondence between Agee and a sympathetic Father Flye, met when Agee was not yet 16. Beginning with a letter written at fifteen in 1925, the letters run right up to May 1955 and Agee's death.
Agee met Father Flye when the young Agee showed up at St. Andrew's School, still deeply effected by the loss of his father two years previously, and he maintained a respectful attachment and affection to the Father and his family throughout his life. Agee wrote about his own father's death in A Death in the Family: A Novel and the story reminds us of the depth of the loss and how it shaped the young Rufus Agee on first meeting with Father Flye. This was before Agee dropped the hick nomenclature of his first name for the far more acceptable and urban James. Following a summer trip to Europe with Father Flye in 1925, Agee's ambitious side found an increasing confidence, and he soon began reading across a wide range of literature; poetry, books in translation, critism, contemporary novels. It's clear Flye's impact on Agee remained a touchstone throughout his life; the letters act as a sort of restorative and re-establishment to the writer as he thinks through his artistic responses to the world around him.

Agee was a challenging high-toned soul, and his unbridled personality is set off by Father Flye's settled, more soft-keyed Philosophy of Religion. Their back and forth interaction of ideas permeates these letters, with the secure faith of Father Flye balancing the intense investiture of worldiness and doubt making up the core of Agee's life's purpose. Anyone appreciating Agee's film criticism will find these personal letters filled with the same probing mind, a searching multi-faceted intelligence that seems fascinated by practically every aspect of life, from top to bottom.

There is an introduction by Father Flye, who explains why his letters, save for a couple special cases, are not included. (Most were lost by Agee, or at least, they weren't available or found when the book was first published.) While these letters represent a stiking synopsis/overview of Agee's thinking over his entire adult life, as well as the ongoing philosophic dialog between the two men, there remains much much more to James Agee as correspondent, and it is hoped a larger edition of letters will eventually be released.
Note: F.Scott Fitzgerald had a similar connection, initially, with Father Sigourney Fay, as can be found in his letters. F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Life in Letters: A New Collection Edited and Annotated by Matthew J. Bruccoli
Cerar
Pure poetry..

The book begins with letters he wrote at age 16 and even then the genius of his writing is evident.

I've read many books of compiled letters as it so easy to read intermittently and what I found unique about these letters is that you get a full sense of who he is, who he thought himself to be.

Though he does not speak frequently of personal issues - marriage, births, etc - it is a very personal book. Personal in that he is one of the few letter writers who writes about himself rather than the "goings on of the day"

I can't recommend it highly enough - by bringing insight into the man, it brings his extraordinary books to a new level.
Letters of James Agee to Father Flye ebook
Author:
James Agee
Category:
Arts & Literature
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1176 kb
FB2 size:
1573 kb
DJVU size:
1992 kb
Language:
Publisher:
BALLANTINE BOOKS @; 2nd edition (1971)
Pages:
271 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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