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Tiger's Heart: The Story of a Modern Chinese Woman ebook

by Aisling Juanjuan Shen


Aisling Juanjuan Shen immigrated to the United States in 2000. Despite of all the adversities and misfortunes that happened to Juanjuan, who I certainly believe has a tiger's heart, her desire of living a better life never diminished.

Aisling Juanjuan Shen immigrated to the United States in 2000. In 2005, she graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College. She currently works for an investment management firm in Boston. In the end, she married to an . citizen, graduated from Wellesley with honors and found a job in the financial industry. As an immigrant myself who came to America at the age of 12, I can relate to Juanjuan's life experience.

This remarkable true story of a Chinese peasant girl’s unlikely rise to success is like a suspense novel. Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny farming hamlet in China’s Yangtze Delta in 1974. Pronounced useless by her parents because she wasn’t good at planting rice, she became the first person from her village ever to attend college. After graduating with a teaching degree, the government assigned her to a remote and low-paying job that she was expected to hold for the rest of her life.

Book by Shen, Aisling Juanjuan. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tiger's Heart: The Story of a Modern Chinese Woman as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Shen, Aisling Juanjuan, 1974-. Shen, Aisling Juanjuan, 1974-, Chinese Americans, Chinese American women, Immigrants, Women, Sex role. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 12, 2013.

Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny farming hamlet in China’s Yangtze Delta in 1974. The story of a modern. Portions of this book appeared in altered form in. Pindeldyboz, Vol. 7 (2007) and in .

Aisling Juanjuan Shen. THE SHEN HAMLET, where I was born, is a small rice-farming village in the heart of the Yangtze River Delta. Journal 1 (Fall/Winter 2007). My parents, the Shens, lived in the center of the hamlet. I was their first child.

Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny rice-farming hamlet in China’s Yangtze Delta in 1974

Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny rice-farming hamlet in China’s Yangtze Delta in 1974.

Born to illiterate peasants, Aisling Juanjuan Shen was the first in her village to go to college. 0in . pt 0in . pt; mso-para-margin:0in; om:. girl born to illiterate parents and bleak prospects rises to prominence as the first person in her village to graduate college.

"Like a suspense novel, this book is impossible to put down. All readers interested in China, as well as memoir fans (especially of success stories), must read this astonishing title."--Library Journal (Starred Review) <p class="MsoNormal">“In Aisling Juanjuan Shen’s remarkable and assured memoir, a peasant girl born to illiterate parents and bleak prospects rises to prominence as the first person in her village to graduate college. Determined to escape the trappings of rural village life, she leaves the stability of a government-assigned teaching post behind and bravely ventures to the south in search of wealth and happiness. Shen offers a brutally honest and vivid portrait of the early days of China’s economic boom, the fascinating interplay between the provinces, the lives of those who leave and those who remain behind, and the cost of abandoning tradition for the promise of prosperity.”—Felicia C. Sullivan, The Sky Isn’t Visible from Here “A brave and honest tale of one woman's struggle to overcome her circumstances and triumph against all odds.”—Alison Weaver, Gone to the Crazies: A Memoir Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny rice-farming hamlet in China’s Yangtze Delta in 1974. Pronounced useless by her parents because she wasn’t good at planting rice, she became the first person from her village ever to attend college. After graduating from teachers college, she was assigned by the government to a remote and low-paying teaching job that she was expected to hold for the rest of her life. Deeply dissatisfied, she bought her way out of her secure government job and left for the special economic zones of southern China in search of happiness and success in the business world. A Tiger’s Heart chronicles Aisling's rise from poverty in the rice fields of rural China to a successful career in business in the early days of the country’s economic boom, illustrating the massive economic and social changes that have taken place in China over the past several decades. Her story is emblematic of a new generation of Chinese women who are leaving the rice paddies and government jobs in order to enter the free market and determine the course of their own lives. Aisling Juanjuan Shen worked as a teacher, saleswoman, and translator in China before immigrating to the United States in 2000. In 2005 she graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College; she currently works for an investment management firm in Boston. Excerpts of A Tiger’s Heart have appeared in Pindeldyboz and H.O.W.
Leniga
If you were born to parents who physically and emotionally tormented you when they weren't plain ignoring you, how far would you go to escape and live on your own terms? Juanjuan Shen's honest and eye-opening memoir takes the reader on a highly emotional journey starting from when she's born to a poor peasant family in rural China. As if frigid winters with no heat and long days with little food weren't bad enough, Juanjuan's mother at one point dares her to kill herself. Even her younger sister provides little solace in this dismal environment. When Juanjuan is lucky enough to go to school, she finally finds something that keeps her going. Staying late to finish her homework and avoid her dysfunctional family, Juanjuan dreams of something no one else in the hamlet has ever done before--to go to college. Her teachers, rather than steering her toward a four year university, all but force her to apply to a two year teacher training college. After she earns an associate's degree, she's assigned by the government to teach middle school in another village. The book takes us through the many incarnations of Juanjuan, from working as a secretary, to being an Amway saleswoman, to working as a translator and then businesswoman for a knitting machine company. Her path to freedom (from her family, from her boyfriends, from China, and from herself) is not easy, but with much hard work and determination, she finally lives the American Dream, settling in Boston and graduating from one of the country's top universities. This book is a must for anyone who has an interest in contemporary Chinese society or who just enjoys a good story about an underdog winning the grand prize at the end.
Jugore
There are billions of them, simple girls, not too beautiful, not too smart, not too ambitious.... ooops, wait, on opposite: they ARE ambitious. The desire for a better life keeps them going and going, through hardship and injustice, through torture and through shame.... everything to get to the Future which will, absolutely, it MUST be, better than today.

Some of them are running away from quite acceptable conditions.

But in the end, it does not matter for as long as they acknowledge to themselves that it all was worth suffering. That the result is greater than the sum of paths they needed to take to get there.

The heroine of this biography has a heart of a Tiger and she has fulfilled her heart's desire. By different means she got where she wanted and reading her story I cannot hold the shiver and ask myself: "What do YOU want this bad?" and to order myself: "You MUST want a better life! You MUST want it in order to move your a** to get it!!!!!"

...and again I am frustrated, if not angry, with myself for the lack of Tigerness in my nature.

...read this book to learn what a simple girl can do to fulfill a quantum jump in her Destiny.

Victoria Evangelina Belyavskaya
Golden Lama
I met Aisling as a colleague in the US a few years ago and I recently read her book.

It is her biography - a story of a girl born in rural China making her way in the world and finally, to the US and Wellesley. If you think you have had a difficult life, Aisling's narration of how she overcame the odds to achieve success in life will make you think twice.

This book takes a honest look at the social forces in China as it transitions into a developed country and how its population is being impacted. A disturbing peek at the vehement desperation of the swarming masses in China. Machiavelli on crack.

There is no garden of roses here - Aisling keeps it real and tells it as it really happened, with both the good and the bad thrown in. She makes it clear throughout the book that she is only human - her path was strewn with countless failures and temptations. In the end, however, it is her getting up from her many falls, wiping off the tears and blood and ploughing on ahead that shows the strength of the human spirit. Perhaps more specifically, the spirit of the modern Chinese woman seeking her place in a new world.
Weiehan
After reading the book, I am happy for the girl Juanjuan. Born in the poorest region of China, grew up in a family w/ parents that were illiterate, felt a dim future when she started teaching at the middle school and failed w/ Amway.. Despite of all the adversities and misfortunes that happened to Juanjuan, who I certainly believe has a tiger's heart, her desire of living a better life never diminished. In the end, she married to an U.S citizen, graduated from Wellesley with honors and found a job in the financial industry. As an immigrant myself who came to America at the age of 12, I can relate to Juanjuan's life experience.
On the other hand, what bothered me a little bit was the author spent numerous of passages describing the sexual affairs and some of the actions that she was willing to take to accomplish her goals. It seems like in China, people are willing to do anything to make money, I mean ANYTHING; whether it is legally or illegally, morally correct or incorrect. I don't think any1 should feel proud of him or herself for taking kickbacks, selling their bosses out and sleeping with men that might help them to further their career, just so they can become rich and live an affluent life. Disappointingly, Juanjuan did those things. I would have much more respect for Juanjuan's story if she had more dignity and loyalty to herself and her boss, instead of just telling herself, I am willing to do anything to make my dreams become true. I guess in the end, her desire for materialistic things just outweighed her dignity and morality, which is a bit saddened.
But now, I wonder, in a nation where having connections can really get you far in life. Realistically speaking, is it really possible for a girl like Juanjuan, who grew up in poverty, didn't have many connections to start with, to accomplish her dreams and move up in the social status ladder without giving up her dignity and integrity? Sadly, the answer is NO or very very very very unlikely.
Tiger's Heart: The Story of a Modern Chinese Woman ebook
Author:
Aisling Juanjuan Shen
Category:
Ethnic & National
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1883 kb
FB2 size:
1326 kb
DJVU size:
1178 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Soho Press; First Edition edition (July 1, 2009)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
mobi lit mbr docx
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