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How to Survive the Titanic: The Sinking of J. Bruce Ismay ebook

by Frances Wilson


Bruce Ismay was handsome, well-educated and well-dressed, and enjoyed cosmopolitan pleasures, but he had . The only thing the Titanic lacked, as it turned out, were sufficient lifeboats.

Bruce Ismay was handsome, well-educated and well-dressed, and enjoyed cosmopolitan pleasures, but he had few close friendships and his marriage quickly grew estranged. His closest relationship seems to have been with the ships he grew to love. Ismay decided not to fill the davits to their capacity of 48 boats, limiting them instead to just 16 lifeboats for 2,223 passengers – which, astonishingly, exceeded the British Board of Trade's requirements. He is said to have justified this decision by declaring that there was no reason to litter the ship's deck: the ship was itself a lifeboat.

328 pages : 22 cm. When the ship hit the iceberg on 14 April 1912 and a thousand men prepared to die, J Bruce Ismay, the ship's owner and inheritor of the White Star fortune. When the ship hit the iceberg on 14 April 1912 and a thousand men prepared to die, J Bruce Ismay, the ship's owner and inheritor of the White Star fortune, jumped into a lifeboat with the women and children and rowed away to safety. Includes bibliographical references (pages 299-306) and index. At sea. Chance - Luckless Yamsi - Youth - These bumble-like proceedings - On land.

Bruce Ismay was managing director and chairman of the White Star Line, the company that built the Titanic. When the ship struck an iceberg on her maiden voyage, Ismay, who was on board, jumped into one of the last lifeboats to leave. He subsequently became, according to a headline, ‘The Most Talked of Man in All the World’. These are some of the things that were said about him: ‘Mr Ismay’s place as a man and as the responsible director of the White Star Line was on the planks of the imperilled ship.

Books have been written, films made, we have raised the Titanic and watched her go down again on numerous occasions, but out of the wreckage Frances Wilson spins a new epic: when the ship hit the iceberg on 14 April 1912 and a thousand men prepared to die, J Bruce Ismay, the ship's.

Books have been written, films made, we have raised the Titanic and watched her go down again on numerous occasions, but out of the wreckage Frances Wilson spins a new epic: when the ship hit the iceberg on 14 April 1912 and a thousand men prepared to die, J Bruce Ismay, the ship's owner and inheritor of the White Star fortune, jumped. into a lifeboat with the women and children and rowed away to safety. Accused of cowardice, Ismay became, according to one headline, 'The Most Talked-of Man in the World'

The sinking of the Titanic is one of those events that create a passionate following. Wilson’s focus is on the Titanic-event as seen from and felt by her creator

The sinking of the Titanic is one of those events that create a passionate following. People who love the Titanic really love the Titanic, to the point where therapeutic intervention seems warranted. Wilson’s focus is on the Titanic-event as seen from and felt by her creator. Part I of How to Survive the Titanic takes us through Ismay’s survival story (what Wilson terms his jump ); includes an in-depth and empathetic portrait of his childhood (with a domineering, spiteful, and distant father); and concludes with a detailed look at Ismay’s humbling experience in front of the American Board of Inquiry.

On April 14, 1912, as one thousand men prepared to die, J. Bruce Ismay, the owner of the RMS Titanic, jumped into a lifeboat filled with women and children and rowed away to safety. He survived the ship's sinking-but his life and reputation would never recover.

Frances Wilson HOW TO SURVIVE THE TITANIC or THE SINKING OF J. BRUCE ISMAY For Pauline J. Bruce Ismay was managing director and chairman of the White Star Line, the company that built the Titanic. J.

A brilliantly original and gripping new look at the sinking of the Titanic through the prism of the life and lost honor of J. Bruce Ismay, the ship’s owner Books have been written and films have been made, we have raised the Titanic and watched her go down again on numerous occasions, but ou. . Bruce Ismay, the ship’s owner Books have been written and films have been made, we have raised the Titanic and watched her go down again on numerous occasions, but out of the wreckage Frances Wilson spins a new. epic: when the ship hit the iceberg on April 14, 1912, and one thousand men, lighting their last cigarettes, prepared to die, J. Bruce Ismay, the ship’s owner and inheritor of the White Star fortune, jumped into a lifeboat filled with women and children and rowe.

The sinking of j. bruce ismay.

In a unique work of history evocative of Joseph Conrad’s classic novel Lord Jim, Wilson raises provocative moral questions about cowardice and heroism, memory and identity, survival and guilt-questions that revolve around Ismay’s loss of honor and identity as his monolithic venture-a ship called The Last Word in Luxury and The Unsinkable -was swallowed. The sinking of j.

Award-winning historian Frances Wilson delivers a gripping new account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, looking at the collision and its aftermath through the prism of the demolished life and lost honor of the ship’s owner, J. Bruce Ismay. In a unique work of history evocative of Joseph Conrad’s classic novel Lord Jim, Wilson raises provocative moral questions about cowardice and heroism, memory and identity, survival and guilt—questions that revolve around Ismay’s loss of honor and identity as his monolithic venture—a ship called “The Last Word in Luxury” and “The Unsinkable”—was swallowed by the sea and subsumed in infamy forever.
Faell
J. Bruce Ismay has gone down in history as a coward and the opposite of a proper Edwardian gentleman simply by being one of the survivors of the Titanic disaster. Did he push aside women to get a seat on a lifeboat or did, as he claimed, help women and child board lifeboats and then only took a seat when there were no other women or children in the area? I've read countless books on THE TITANIC so I thought it would be interesting to read a book that focused on the life of J. Bruce Ismay. Unfortunately, there is little new in this book. Yes, we get more details on Ismay's upbringing, marriage and life after the Titanic, but is there really anything of substance to tell in this book?
The book does start off interestingly enough as we experience the sinking and the loss of life and the survivors. If you've read other books on the TITANIC, there is really nothing new in this book. Of course, if you know nothing about J. Bruce Ismay, it's a good primer on the sinking and on Ismay's life.
I agree with other reviews who don't see the connection to the constant comparison of Ismay to Joseph Conrad's LORD JIM, which is referenced over and over.
I had hoped for so much more and was sadly disappointed.
Dilkree
I bought this book because I'm fascinated by the Titanic legend, have been reading everything I can get my hands on that ties into the centennial of the Titanic's sinking, and find Bruce Ismay an interesting and seriously flawed character who was also coincidentally a real person.
Ismay was the president of the White Star Line. He was instrumental in having the ship built and was its biggest promoter and cheerleader. He was also present on the ship's maiden voyage and also the symbolic scapegoat for the disaster that claimed hundreds of lives due to a combination of poor planning, ineptitude, and a multitude unfortunate circumstances that culminated in one of the greatest maritime disasters of the 20th century. If all that wasn't bad enough, ismay also survived the Titanic. As it would turn out, that was probably one of Ismay's greatest offenses because he was labeled a coward and a villain and held up to public scrutiny for the rest of his life.
With its snappy title, I expected this book would be loaded with information about the Titanic, its sinking and its aftermath. I also hoped this book would provide information about Ismay's life and his involvement in the Titanic disaster. While my expectations were met to the extent that there was plenty of biographical information which included details about Ismay's personal life, his family, and his business decisions and career, the author continually tried to draw a direct connection to the character of Kurtz in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness with allusions to John Galsworthy and the Golden Age tossed in.
I personally found the literary allusions irritating, redundant, and tiresome. It bogged down an interesting story that could easily stand on its own. Often, this approach is used to make literature seem relevant when teaching, but trying to draw a comparison between Ismay and a fictional character really has little impact other than irritating a reader.
I liked the factual information included in this book, but the literary tangents brought this book down for me.
Dordred
I appreciated learning more about this man who was certainly despised by the survivors of the Titanic tragedy and their families and the public in general. It gave me some empathy for him and helped me see him more as a human being doing his best in a really bad and confusing situation. Blaming a person for not acting heroically is a strange thing for us to do since we cannot truly know how we would behave given the same dire circumstances.
Lightseeker
Firstly, if I wanted to read about Joseph Conrad's "Lord Jim," I'd read the novel myself rather than someone else's book report on the subject. That Frances Wilson decided to pepper her book with detailed descriptions of the Conrad novel is to the book's detriment. I found myself skipping over those sections until I found content relating to Bruce Ismay or the Titanic story because I found the "Lord Jim" content irrelevant. True: Conrad's story is eerily similar to what Ismay did as the Titanic sank, but this coincidence does not warrant such attention.

Secondly, if Wilson disliked her subject as much as she disliked Ismay, why did she spend two hundred and fifty pages writing about him (and "Lord Jim")? Her dislike of him seeps, no, oozes off of every page. Several times she refers to his behavior as cowardly and insults him at every turn. While I don't think every author needs to like their subject, when one writes so negatively about them as Wilson does about Ismay, I tend to find that I trust the author less. Wilson presents nothing but a deeply biased portrait of what is really an interesting man, a victim of his time, and a victim of public opinion.

No matter what you may think about him, J. Bruce Ismay deserves better than this sinking catastrophe.
one life
Another angle of the Titanic Disaster covered in great detail. As a lifelong Titanic historian, I loved the book
Goldendragon
Such a great premise, but such a disappointment. This book gets far too mired down in the legal proceedings surrounding the sinking. Furthurmore, the author makes long and painful attempts to relate Mr. Ismay to characters in Conrad's writings. The amount of time devoted to this comparision is just too painful to endure. The book comes across as a longwinded term paper from an overeager English Literature major. The critical and interesting parts of this book would include more of Ismay's interactions with people in the years/decades after the sinking, yet there is sparse attention given to this area.
Nnulam
I read this book over the Christmas holidays and thoroughly enjoyed it. I thought it fleshed out a shadowy character well, and I found the background info on Edwardian life really interesting. While, clearly, the Titanic is a major character, she's not the main one, nor is she meant to be. If you're looking for info to add to your in-depth knowledge of the Titanic, and only the Titanic, this is not the book for you. I loved it because I am into biographies. YMMV. Recommended.
How to Survive the Titanic: The Sinking of J. Bruce Ismay ebook
Author:
Frances Wilson
Category:
Historical
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1122 kb
FB2 size:
1258 kb
DJVU size:
1771 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (March 27, 2012)
Pages:
384 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
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