liceoartisticolisippo-ta
» » Scottish Journey

Scottish Journey ebook

by Edwin Muir


Edwin Muir, Scottish Journey (Mainstream Publishing, 1935). Edwin Muir is a pretty good writer, when he sticks to travelogues and abstract philosophy. He doesn't do so in Scottish Journey, though one would think so from the first hundred pages.

Edwin Muir (15 May 1887 – 3 January 1959) was a Scottish poet, novelist and translator

Edwin Muir (15 May 1887 – 3 January 1959) was a Scottish poet, novelist and translator. His wife, Willa Muir, translated the works of many German authors, including Franz Kafka. These were issued under their joint names, but his wife notes that he "only helped".

Edwin Muir's Scottish Journey has the clarity and impact of a brilliant photograph

Edwin Muir's Scottish Journey has the clarity and impact of a brilliant photograph. For writing of this kind it has no real rival in the inter-war years. Muir held up a mirror to the face of Scotland all those years ago. It is frightening to see so many recognisable features in its glass.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Edwin Muir's journey took him from Edinburgh to the Lowlands.

Journeys and Places: A Study of the Poetry of Edwin Muir. Master's Theses by an authorized administrator of Loyola eCommons. SCOTTISH AND I TIONAL Tos IN TEE WORK OF EDWIN MUIR AND ]NEIL M. GUNK by Margery. 95 MB·0 Downloads·New! to leave the Bu and it was. childhood of Ursula in The Rainbow which one notices in Muir's auto-. Handbook of Principles of Organizational Behavior.

Edwin Muir was born in Deerness, Orkney, on 15 May 1887

Edwin Muir was born in Deerness, Orkney, on 15 May 1887. His father was a farmer but in 1901 he lost his farm and they left Orkney to live in Glasgow, a move with tragic consequences. Muir’s father, mother and two brothers died in fairly quick succession and the teenage Muir had to find work; he was employed in a series of grindingly awful jobs in offices and factories, the latter including one where charcoal was produced from bones.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Scottish Journey by Edwin Muir (Paperback, 1996) at the . A slight tan to page edges Authors : Muir, Edwin. ISBN : 9781851588411. Product Category : Books. List Price (MSRP) : . 9.

A slight tan to page edges Authors : Muir, Edwin.

In 1934 the Orcadian poet Edwin Muir embarked on his iconic 'Scottish Journey' a set of travels round .

In 1934 the Orcadian poet Edwin Muir embarked on his iconic 'Scottish Journey' a set of travels round depression-era Scotland where he tried to get to grips with Scottish identity and to consider what the future held for a country whose industries were being devastated by a recession. This week we reach the end of Muir's journey in Orkney heading with teacher and author Simon Hall to the tiny island of Wyre where the poet was brought up. Muir thought Orkney was the best of all possible worlds with its mix of farming, technology and timelessness.

Scottish poet, critic, novelist and translator. Margery Palmer McCulloch: Edwin Muir and a story of Europe (Oxford University Press Blog). Or illustrations in a book of knights. We did not dare go near them. Yet they waited, Stubborn and shy, as if they had been sent By an old command to find our whereabouts And that long-lost archaic companionship.

A Scottish Journey - Personal Impressions of Modern Scotland' is out now! Written by enaney and published by hPress. Free event: James McEnaney: A Scottish Journey 11 Oct kwellEdin Inspired by Edwin Muir’s travels around Scotland in 1934, this year Enaney set off on his own Scottish Journey-a 1500-mile exploration of the nation’s communities.

First published in 1935, Scottish Journey is a perceptive, subtle, and beautifully written account by one of Scotland's greatest modern writers of prose and poetry. Edwin Muir's journey took him from Edinburgh to the Lowlands, to Glasgow and the Highlands, and the book, while a masterpiece of travel writing, is also a quest for the real nature of Scottish identity.
Moonshaper
I bought this book before spending a summer in Scotland. The feeling you get reading about the author's journeys to the highlands are just like when I traveled there myself. The cities of Glasgow and Edingurgh have changed a lot though.
Xanna
Edwin Muir, Scottish Journey (Mainstream Publishing, 1935)
Edwin Muir is a pretty good writer, when he sticks to travelogues and abstract philosophy. He doesn't do so in Scottish Journey, though one would think so from the first hundred pages. Scottish Journey is meant as (and was commissioned as) a travelogue, and for the most part, Muir sticks to the template. He writes well of the Scots countryside, and passably of Edinburgh, slipping in bits of philosophy here and there, as is to be expected in any good travelogue. As well, Muir is an extremely quotable writer; his words are clear and precise, and draw excellent pictures in the reader's mind.
Muir was, however, an ardent Socialist of the closed-minded sort, as much as he professes otherwise. This affects the book in his long chapter on Glasgow, which he starts with a screed against Industrialism (he always capitalizes the word, I might as well, too) and capitalism. Humorously, he attempts to say that Industrialism, in and of itself, isn't all that bad. He does so in a paragraph that spans almost two and a half pages. The first and last few sentences are of the opinion that Industrialism isn't all that bad. It's the middle hundred or so sentences that shoot the argument in the foot, as he catalogs a list of the horrors he sees in Glasgow. One wonders how it's possible to write all these things and frame them with "it's not bad." It would be kind of like a pagan writing the same of the Inquisition, from the evils that Muir ascribes to Industrialism.
What's worse, he can't see the forest for the trees. In one breath, he talks about ho a capitalist system can't take population contraction into account; in the next, he's talking about unemployment. And he sees no correlation between the two, or at least none he's willing to admit. At one point, perhaps the book's nadir, he says, while discussing the rise of the Scottish Nationalist party, "....If such devotion and fidelity are not to be admired, then all our ideas of morality are mistaken." Leaving it as it is, he infers that no such thing could possibly be true. Yet not five pages later, at the beginning of his chapter on the Highlands, he has little good to say about the morality of a people who are so embarrassed by the twin hills known as the Paps of Jura, one of Scotland's biggest tourist draws at the time, that he couldn't find a postcard that showed them clearly anywhere in the town. One is tempted to see the inconsistencies as a (sub?)conscious undercutting of Muir's own arguments, but nothing else in the book points to it; the man's to solid and straightforward a writer to resort to such tricks.
Overall, though, it's worth checking out for the travel writing and the easy read. Just take his political outlook with a grain of salt. ** ½
Scottish Journey ebook
Author:
Edwin Muir
Category:
Historical
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1742 kb
FB2 size:
1951 kb
DJVU size:
1400 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Mainstream Publishing (February 1, 1996)
Pages:
250 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
rtf azw txt mobi
© 2018-2020 Copyrights
All rights reserved. liceoartisticolisippo-ta.it | Privacy Policy | DMCA | Contacts