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FDR: The War President, 1940-1943: A History ebook

by Kenneth S. Davis


FDR: the beckoning of destiny,: 1882-1928; a history .

FDR: the beckoning of destiny,: 1882-1928; a history, Kenneth S. Davis. The fifth volume of Kenneth S. Davis's magisterial, much-praised biography follows FDR from his re-election to an unprecedented third term in November 1940 through New Year's Eve, 1942, when he screened a brand-new film, Casablanca, at the White House. During the intervening 25 months, President Roosevelt prepared a reluctant nation for the war that he knew was coming, then struggled to maintain the government's commitment to his New Deal social programs, as well as the conflict overseas.

FDR: The War President, 1940-1943: A History. FDR surely could have done more

FDR: The War President, 1940-1943: A History. 0679415424 (ISBN13: 9780679415428). FDR surely could have done more. That said, Davis does make FDRs case as in other parts of the book, FDR was singular in wanting to beat Germany, but also concerned with keeping a coalition, and thinking America was too anti-Semitic to get behind this issue, and so in his mind, beating Germany was his priority.

FDR: The War President opens as Roosevelt has been re-elected to a third term and the United . The lessons and concerns of 1940-1943 as dissected in this book are still relevant to the problems and concerns of our own time.

FDR: The War President opens as Roosevelt has been re-elected to a third term and the United States is drifting toward a war that has already engulfed Europe. Roosevelt, as commander in chief, statesman, and politician, must navigate a delicate balance between helping those in Europe-while remaining mindful of the forces of isolation both in the Congress and the country-and protecting the gains of the New Deal, upon which he has spent so much of his prestige and power.

Kenneth Sydney Davis (September 29, 1912 – June 10, 1999) was an American historian and university professor, most renowned for his series of biographies of Franklin Delano . FDR: The War President: 1940-1943. ISBN 0-679-41542-4, 2000). FDR: New York Years: 1928-1933.

Kenneth Sydney Davis (September 29, 1912 – June 10, 1999) was an American historian and university professor, most renowned for his series of biographies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Davis also wrote biographies of Charles Lindbergh, Adlai Stevenson, and authored the first biography of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, entitled Dwight D. Eisenhower: Soldier of Democracy. The public opinion in the USA, during 1939 and 1940, was one that when the allied had an edge in any battle against the Germans & what, you see anyway they can win without us (USA)' when Germany was winning, the thinking was & since it's all over we better stay out, there is nothing we can do anymore'.

Davis was part of a distinguished group of Roosevelt biographers . FDR: Into the Storm, 1937-1940.

Davis was part of a distinguished group of Roosevelt biographers, including Arthur M. Schlesinger, J. Frank Freidel, James MacGregor Burns, Geoffrey Ward, and Doris Kearns Goodwin. Scholars will not find many revelations in The War Years, but it is scintillating reading and a provocative synthesis of the existing secondary literature.

FDR: The War President, 1940-1943. There will not be a sixth, as Davis passed away in 1999, but the achievement cemented by this book is monumental. FDR: The War President, 1940-1943. This is the long-awaited fifth volume of Davis' life of Roosevelt. Calling himself a "hero-needful author," Davis frankly confesses his admiration for . but nonetheless remains cold-eyed about "so multilayered, devious, and secretive a role-player. American decision-making at the pivot of world history, 1940 to 1942, is masterfully depicted in all its human detail.

FDR The War President 1940-1943 a history by Kenneth S. BRAND NEW,in plastic,never opened,Biblio selling for 8. 0 for "new condition",this copy must be slightly better since hands have never opened it. do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers. posted: 2019-10-28 08:53. updated: 2019-10-30 09:56.

FDR: The War President opens as Roosevelt has been re-elected to a third term and the United States is drifting toward a war that has already engulfed Europe. Roosevelt, as commander in chief, statesman, and politician, must navigate a delicate balance between helping those in Europe--while remaining mindful of the forces of isolation both in the Congress and the country--and protecting the gains of the New Deal, upon which he has spent so much of his prestige and power.Kenneth S. Davis draws vivid depictions of the lives, characters, and temperaments of the military and political personalities so paramount to the history of the time: Churchill, Stalin, de Gaulle, and Hitler; Generals Marshall, Eisenhower, and MacArthur; Admiral Darlan, Chiang Kai-shek, Charles Lindbergh, William Allen White, Joseph Kennedy, Averell Harriman, Harry Tru-man, Robert Murphy, Sidney Hillman, William Knud-sen, Cordell Hull, Henry Morgenthau, Henry Stimson, A. Philip Randolph, Wendell Willkie, and Henry Wallace.The portrait of Henry Hopkins, who interacted with many of these personalities on behalf of Roosevelt, is woven into this history as the complex, interconnected relationship it was. Hopkins burnished the relationship between Churchill and Roosevelt and eased the way for their interactions with Stalin.Another set of characters central to Roosevelt's life and finely drawn by the author includes Eleanor Roo-sevelt, Sara Roosevelt, Missy LeHand, Grace Tully, Princess Martha of Norway, and Daisy Suckley.Integral to this history as well are the Argentina Conference, the Atlantic Charter and the beginnings of the United Nations, the Moscow Conference, lend-lease, the story of the building of the atomic bomb, Hitler's Final Solution and how Roosevelt and the State Department reacted to it, Pearl Harbor and war with Japan, the planning of Torch, and the murder of Admiral Darlan. All these stories intersect with the economic and social problems facing Roosevelt at home as the United States mobilizes for war.The lessons and concerns of 1940-1943 as dissected in this book are still relevant to the problems and concerns of our own time. A recurrent theme is technology: Do people control technology, or does technology control people?Kenneth Davis had the rare gift of writing history that reads with the immediacy of a novel; and though the outcome of this history is well known, the events and people depicted here keep the reader focused on an enthralling suspense story.
Bine
The late Kenneth Davis wrote a good number of books, both fiction and non fiction and I have his earlier works of FDR but read this one first, somewhat getting the cart before the horse.

The research that has gone into this book is nothing less than extraordinary. It is a book of FDR from 1940-1943; it is long, being over 700 pages of small print, but it is so comprehensive in its scope. There are so many important characters that are accurately and vividly portrayed as they worked with FDR, around and sometimes against FDR.

The author shows FDR to be the visionary and supreme leader in such a critical time in our history, but also shows the frustrating side of Roosevelt. He could slowly, and carefully try to gauge American public opinion, and leave his aides twisting in the wind waiting for him to make a definitive stance, which often never did quite materialize sometimes for months or longer.

There are the obvious supporting players in this story, notably Churchill wearing his best selling shoes for American aide and involvement, Stalin, Sidney Hillman who likely had the most frustrating job in dealing with labor relations, and Harry Hopkins, a man on the edge of death but a constant consummate deal maker whether it be between the Americans and British, or the Russians, or just helping to encourage FDR. Somewhere in America, there should be a statue of Harry Hopkins. I would also recommendThe Hopkins Touch: Harry Hopkins and the Forging of the Alliance to Defeat Hitler for more detail.

There was so much at stake during this time, and FDR was constantly trying to deliberate between the many union demands to keep the war production going (before we were at war), and also interesting how successful attempts were made to get war orders to small business across the country. These business were in dire need of the same materials needed for war (especially aluminum) and if only the giant corporations received all the inventory, then a more serious problem would arise of many Americans going back to the unemployment lines for lack of work.

There are so many things I could discuss in this review, but I feel it futile to write a ten page summary which would bore you and myself to death, but I will leave off by saying what a tremendous work it is. There are authors like Kenneth Davis who are prolific but never quite bask in the sunlight of the popularity that some historical authors enjoy today, and we all know who the favorites are. They can publish some 200 page "fresh idea" book and the marketing departments kick in and the sales soar, and they have their purpose, if nothing else getting people to read something, but then there these scholars that spend decades in serious research and study and provide posterity something that can be used for years, and Davis was one of those.

So, the book is not a fast read, it is not full of clever little quips; it is certainly not hero worship of FDR, but it is enormous in its result.

I would also recommend the single volume Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom
Zan
In the first part of this wonderful biography, Davis attempts to go inside FDR's often-elusive personality at the conclusion of the 1940 election, and, amazingly enough, succeeds in giving us a very credible depiction of the inner thoughts of a leader in crisis. Davis then explores Roosevelt's leadership, which often amounted to drift, and what must have been mind-boggling frustration in trying to lead the country, united, into war against Hitler. The mistakes and personal deficiencies of the man are clearly pointed out, including his absurd pro-Vichy policy and animosity for De Gaulle, and his repeated failures in administration, but one is left with a greater understanding of what were perhaps FDR's finest hour and his deepening relationship with Churchill in together saving democracy and destroying one of the two or three worst tyrants of the Century. Neither could have done it alone, and it is hard to see how any other pair could have succeeded as well as they did---certainly not Wendell Wilkie or any other Republican, and not Henry Wallace, despite his considerable talents.
superstar
This volume fitted in very well with my three volume history of FDR by Schlesinger and Davis' first volume "FDR Into the Strom: 1937- 1940." The details of the conferences between FDR and Churchill added greatly to my understanding of those difficult years I was able to view only through the newspapers. As usual, Davis' prose was easy to read and yet not skimpy on important details. The role Hopkins played as Roosevelt's "errand boy" emerges more clearly in this account than in any of the other accounts I have read.
CrazyDemon
This is the last volume of a 5 volume set. The writing is masterful and well researched. This book is not easy to find but it came in excellent condition, promptly and at a reasonable price.
Najinn
FDR did wonderful things for this country and he fought his party and other countries to do what needed to be done. This book tells the story of his end, but the reading is slow and dull.
RUL
I am very happy with the everything about this transaction...thank you very much...I would recommend to anyone this type of buying.
Kata
I've purchased and enjoyed the four preceding Kenneth Davis studies on Franklin Roosevelt and this volume continues a masterful biographical effort. Davis' books are extremely detailed and if you have a peripheral interest in Roosevelt, he would probably not be the historian of choice. The minutiae he provides is a delight Roosevelt fans who love the slightest tid-bit on their hero. His research methods are sober, industrious and trustworthy, his FDR-bias generally masked.
The strength of this study is the focus upon FDR's masterful manner of maneuvering an isolationist power into war. The chapters on Lend-Lease, while not providing any new information, still make for riveting reading. The Churchill-FDR political and military partnership is also explored in depth, with Churchill justly taking some heavy criticism for some of his decisions and meddlesome efforts into the Allied offense against Hitler.
The only criticism is that Davis does not focus sufficiently on FDR as a human being and the vast importance of Eleanor Roosevelt is somewhat obsfucated. I would have liked to have seen some exploration into Eleanor's relationships with Lorena Hickock and Earl Miller, and a greater emphasis on FDR's relationship with Missy LeHand, his secretary.
Still, Davis' effort is an excellent continuation on his epic Roosevelt biography. I can't wait for the concluding volume.
FDR: The War President, 1940-1943: A History ebook
Author:
Kenneth S. Davis
Category:
Leaders & Notable People
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1104 kb
FB2 size:
1561 kb
DJVU size:
1786 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Random House; 1st edition (November 28, 2000)
Pages:
848 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
lrf txt mbr lit
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