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Zelda Fitzgerald : Her Voice in Paradise ebook

by Sally Cline


well, actually this ties for first place with Kendall Taylor's bio, which is equally brilliant but on a totally different level. In these he is an equally flawed human being much like Zelda, but a man whose lifelong coverup of his insecurities included alcohol abuse and adultery.

This book is dedicated. contact the Visual Materials Division, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, Princeton University Library, where there are copies of the slides of Zelda’s paintings; contact Sally Cline (c/o John Murray (Publishers) Ltd) who also has copies of the slides.

No one doubted the gravity of the situation. Minnie, outwardly stoical, daily more anxious, relied on Marjorie, Clothilde, Anthony and now Zelda, a difficult role for the frail haggard-looking Sayre. Scott’s attitude towards Zelda ‘was that of an anxious parent toward a sick child. He sent her to bed at . 0. 1 Slowly Zelda recovered in safe Southern territory perfumed by magnolias and tea-olives. 2 In November 1931 death stalked another of Zelda’s friends.

Cline is English and brings a more worldly perspective in her analysis.

well, actually this ties for first place with Kendall Taylor's bio, which is equally brilliant but on a totally different level. Cline is English and brings a more worldly perspective in her analysis. Her only fault is trying too hard to be "fair and balanced" with regard to Mr Scott Fitzgerald.

Zelda Fitzgerald book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Zelda Fitzgerald: Her Voice in Paradise as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Zelda Fitzgerald, along with her husband F. Scott Fitzgerald, is remembered above all else as a personification of the style and glamour of the roaring twenties - an age of carefree affluence such as the world has not seen since

Zelda Fitzgerald, along with her husband F. Scott Fitzgerald, is remembered above all else as a personification of the style and glamour of the roaring twenties - an age of carefree affluence such as the world has not seen since. But along with the wealth and parties came a troubled mind, at a time when a woman exploiting her freedom of expression was likely to attract accusations of insanity. After 1934 Zelda spent most of her life in a mental institution; outliving her husband by few years, she died in a fire as she was awaiting electroconvulsive therapy in a sanatorium.

The chapter was previously included in a book titled Zelda Fitzgerald: Her Voice in Paradise. a book by Sally Cline. Nineteen twenty-seven started modestly. The book was first published in 2002 by John Murray (Publishers) Ltd, England, and the ISBN number is 1-55970-688-0. It was the lure of the bucks that tempted Scott when United Artists invited him to Los Angeles to write an original flapper comedy for Constance Talmadge.

Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald ed. .

Dear Scott, Dearest Zelda: The Love Letters of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald ed Jackson R Bryers and Cathy W Barks 387pp, Bloomsbury, £2. Scott Fitzgerald, is remembered above all else as a personification of. Sally Cline's biography, first published in 2003, makes use of letters, journals, and doctor's records to detail the development of their marriage, and to show the collusion between husband and doctors in a misdirected attempt to 'cure' Zelda's illness.

Alsanadar
I wanted to learn more about the Fitzgeralds and this book taught me a lot. Very interesting.
Danskyleyn
Book was new and I was very pleased. Research is excellent. Thank you!
Ffan
Still reading, has a ton of information. Too much naming names and backstory of Fitzgerald friends. Good book though, probably should have went for a more basic bio.
Fegelv
If you take the time and read every other biography out there about Zelda Fitzgerald, you will notice something strange. While every one covers the same person and materials, not every biography is exactly the same. Nancy Milford's "Zelda" reads like a Fitzgerald novel- beautiful, careless and tragic. Kendall Taylor's "Sometimes Madness is Wisdom" focuses more on Zelda as an individual with multiple flaws and multiple talents, and also destroys the mythical love story that everyone thought was "Scott and Zelda". Sally Cline's "Her Voice in Paradise" expands on Kendall Taylor's basic concept but makes it all her own with such detailed research and weaving all of the broken stories together into one beautiful mosaic.
I would list this as THE best biography written about Zelda...well, actually this ties for first place with Kendall Taylor's bio, which is equally brilliant but on a totally different level. Read both and you get two separate layers of Zelda's short and complicated life. Any pity or admiration that you felt for Scott before reading either of these will most certainly vanish, for these books do not paint him as the romantic character that his legend portrays. In these he is an equally flawed human being much like Zelda, but a man whose lifelong coverup of his insecurities included alcohol abuse and adultery.
So in conclusion, if you are a voracious reader with a thirst for knowledge and devouring every detail into your mind, I would recommend that you buy this book immediately.
Winn
One reviewer (Ms Kay) opines this is the best of the Zelda biographies, whereas another ("skc-33") opines that the Cline biography is not enjoyable, that it reads like a dissertation. I agree that the Cline biography is extremely well researched but I disagree with regard to the references: the footnotes are not a bit distractive. I hardly noticed them. In fact, they were much less intrusive than I've experienced in other nonfiction works. The author's information on the other characters in the lives of the Fitzgeralds (the Hemingways, the Menckens, Dos Passos, Edmund Wilson, Dorothy Parker, and dozens more) adds so much more to this biography; I found it a delightful surprise to have so much additional information on these other personalities with whom I am only casually acquainted. In addition, these other people played such an important role in the lives of the Fitzgeralds, it would have been unfortunate if Cline had omitted them.

Cline is English and brings a more worldly perspective in her analysis. Her only fault is trying too hard to be "fair and balanced" with regard to Mr Scott Fitzgerald. It is abundantly clear (through this biography and others) that he may have had a natural talent to write, but he was dishonest (stole his wife's journals without her knowledge, much less her blessing); plagiarized almost word for word Zelda's diaries into his own works; was an alcoholic of the worst degree; was an adulterer (I have no problems with an open marriage where both parties agree, but in this case, Zelda did not); and who did all he could to insure Zelda would not reach her potential as a writer, dancer, or painter. Despite his strong Catholic upbringing and desire to be buried in the Church, he had only a slight problem, it appears, with supporting Zelda's decision to have as many as three abortions (and he left it up to her, deferring his own judgment or strong opinion one way or the other; and giving her no emotional support after the decision was made). As one reviewer has posted, these personality faults do not matter; it is what one leaves behind. Even if one agrees with that, one will learn in all these biographies of Zelda, it was her work that was left behind and not his.

If I had only one biography of Zelda's to read, it would be Cline's. As noted above, I agree wholeheartedly with the review by Ms. Kay.

Incidentally, if you are still curious about Mr Fitzgerald's romantic side, he purposely did not wed Zelda in her home town (Montgomery, AL), but more than a thousand miles away (NYC), making it nearly impossible for any of Zelda's family or friends to attend; he limited the wedding to six people, and started the wedding early despite knowing that two of the six (Zelda's sister and her husband) would miss the ceremony.

And one more thing: Mr Fitzgerald did not allow Zelda to attend the baptism of their only child, "Scottie," for fear of what Zelda might do or say at that ceremony. The wedding story is told in all biographies; I only learned of the baptism story in Cline's biography.
Samuhn
If you prefer to read a biography like you would read a work of literature, this is not the book for you.
This book is not enjoyable; it reads like a dissertation. Every few sentences are cited from some other source, mostly using direct quotes, leading me to believe that the author never learned the art of rewriting something in her own words. I respect the fact that she did a lot of research, but I don't want to be reminded of it in every paragraph. When the author actually bothers to use her own words, the prose doesn't flow and relies too much on heavy descriptive phrases. Too much time is spent giving lengthy biographies of other incidental characters like the Hemingways, the Menckens, and Dos Passos.
The constant reference numbers are very distracting, as is the perpetual adoration for Zelda herself. The author makes reference to Zelda's "madness" via quotes from the Fitzgeralds' contemporaries, and then immediately discredits the source as jealous or influenced by time or some other excuse.
The book would be a slightly better read if the reader was allowed to make judgments for him/herself.
I might recommend this book to someone who was doing research on Zelda Fitzgerald (or other '20s-'30s personalities) for a paper, but I would not recommend this book to anyone who enjoys reading.
Zelda Fitzgerald : Her Voice in Paradise ebook
Author:
Sally Cline
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1873 kb
FB2 size:
1404 kb
DJVU size:
1534 kb
Language:
Publisher:
John Murray Pubs Ltd (September 30, 2003)
Pages:
512 pages
Rating:
4.8
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