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I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me: A Memoir ebook

by Jimmy Breslin


Jimmy Breslin is so poetic, democratic, thoughtful - I want to be him or meet him or something.

Jimmy Breslin is so poetic, democratic, thoughtful - I want to be him or meet him or something. He talks about people one doesn't know unfolding into people one can't wait to tell others about, and I feel that way all the time about the people I meet and interview. Great book, but if I had mimicked Breslin's style when writing my memoir then I'd have ended up sharing stories of scoring on the wrong goal in soccer and laughing hysterically after someone said "boob.

Breslin makes little or no concession to readers as he careens from remembrance to remembrance of his long journalistic career (and this is in the mid-90s)

Breslin makes little or no concession to readers as he careens from remembrance to remembrance of his long journalistic career (and this is in the mid-90s). How many remember Casey Stengel or the Son of Sam, let alone Bernie Goetz or the mob figures he recalls? In the end, this is a marvelous recollection of his life, a reflection on writing, and a philosphical discussion on religion and spirituality, spurred by the diagnosis of a brain aneuyrsm that threatened all of it.

In addition to writing articles, Breslin authored multiple books. Selected works are listed below. 1988 The World According to Jimmy Breslin. 1997 I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me: A Memoir. 1962 Sunny Jim: The life of America's most beloved horseman, James Fitzsimmons ASIN B0007DY5XS. 1963 Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? ASIN: B00704TRH6. ISBN 978-0-89919-310-6. 1991 Damon Runyon: A Life. 2002 American Lives: The Stories of the Men and Women Lost on September 11. ISBN 40159-77-5. 2002 I Don't Want to Go to Jail: A Novel.

Jimmy Breslin was born James Earle Breslin on October 17, 1928 in Queens, New York

Jimmy Breslin was born James Earle Breslin on October 17, 1928 in Queens, New York. His nonfiction books included The Good Rat, The Short Sweet Dream of Eduardo Gutierrez, I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me, The Church That Forgot Christ, and biographies of Damon Runyon and Branch Rickey. He died on March 19, 2017 at the age of 88.

I Want to thank my brain for remembering me. A Memoir. Little, Brown & Company. Although its title may sound funny on first reading, Jimmy Breslin is far from joking when he calls this memoir ''I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering M. ' For one thing, the focus of his story is the surgery he had done on a brain aneurysm that was discovered by pure luck in the autumn of 1994. Aside from the obvious danger that the arterial bubble might burst before he could have it treated, there was the riskiness of the procedure itself.

Call it a miracle, fate, pure luck, or just another day in the city where nothing is usual, but in 1991 Jimmy Breslin narrowly escaped death - which inspired him to write this book about his life. Two years ago, Breslin was having trouble getting his left eyelid to open and close. This was too peculiar to ignore, so Breslin decided to pay a rare visit to his doctor. As it turned out, the eyelid was a matter of nerves.

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Jimmy Breslin reflects on his life after surviving a brain aneurysm in I Want . Similar books by other authors. September 1997 : USA Paperback.

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Jimmy Breslin reflects on his life after surviving a brain aneurysm in I Want To Thank My Brain For Remembering M.

Jimmy Breslin Nonfiction. Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond. com, Inc. ↑. Back to top.

NonfictionLarge Print EditionHis memoir is as tough as the streets of New York, and as sensitive as a poet in search of the truth. starred, Publishers WeeklyCall it a miracle, fate, pure luck, or just another day in the city, but in 1994 Jimmy Breslin narrowly escaped death after doctors discovered an aneurysm in his brain that could have burst and killed him at any moment. Opting to try a risky surgical procedure and surviving prompted him to take stock of his remarkable life. From his rocky childhood in Queens to his legendary career as a reporter and Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist, this is the unforgettable memoir of a man confronting mortality as he assesses the meaning and measure of his life.
Brick my own
It's hard to evaluate this book. It will not appeal to everyone, and for some of us, that's a strength. Breslin makes little or no concession to readers as he careens from remembrance to remembrance of his long journalistic career (and this is in the mid-90s). How many remember Casey Stengel or the Son of Sam, let alone Bernie Goetz or the mob figures he recalls?

In the end, this is a marvelous recollection of his life, a reflection on writing, and a philosphical discussion on religion and spirituality, spurred by the diagnosis of a brain aneuyrsm that threatened all of it. With or without the framework of the disease, the book succeeds on the basis of Breslin's beautifully rendered memories of his childhood, his early days in the newspaper business and the celebrity that he achieved on the strength of his writing and dogged pursuit of the story no one else could find -- typified by the portrait of the man who dug JFK's grave.

There are many fine moments in the book. You'll discover those yourselves by reading it. I'll say that one that stuck out for me is his recollection of the days after JFK's assassination when he viewed the quiet scene outside the White House with Tip O'Neill and reflected on how the lack of drama served to set the United States apart from other countries.

The book also reveals the curiosity that made (makes) him a great reporter. Lots of information about his medical condition. In the end, he wins. His memory is preserved. We win too. Bravo, Mr. Breslin.
Goltigor
"You take emotions, curiosity, whim, wandering around, out of a day's work and you have a corporation of zombies giving you an array of facts and details not worth space in a waste-basket." writes Jimmy Breslin of many of his fellow journalists. No commercials in Jimmy Breslin's prose, just gusty gutsy sentences, long crescendos, reflective adagios, and many many characters, all of them greater than life.
This is a book of reminiscences first and foremost - thirty years of roaming New York's (and the world's) back streets like a mongrel journalist dog, sniffing garbage, following up on a scent, and peeing at lampposts to mark the most extraordinary territory on earth. Never awed, never condescending, Breslin is simply and unwaveringly curious - hence masterly.
In the second part of the book this curiosity takes him into the OR and over the medical logs unflinchingly to understand the brain surgery he underwent, and to report on it. I'm not sure he fully succeeds in weaving it all into a story, though. It is like passengers watching on the TV screen the plane as it takes off - instant replay, and a bit unreal, or a gimmick. So what, it remains a great read.
Beazerdred
What an interesting approach to describing the journey of having brain surgery from the patient's view. Spell binding in my opinion.
Gunos
Good read. Classic Breslin. Graphic description of his brain surgery is excellent, but not for the fainthearted.
Bukelv
Very good.
HelloBoB:D
good solid little story
Onetarieva
Received as expected in the condition expected.
Outspoken New York newspaper columnist and author Breslin, famed for his sharp eye and wit, explores his own brain in this memoir of his life and his experience with brain surgery.

The book opens the night before his aneurysm surgery in 1994 and closes with him leaving the hospital, mind intact. In between is a free-association of flashbacks - a rollicking ride through his life, his city and his work - punctuated by contemplative reflections on the nature of God and the human mind.

"I lived in the everyday excitement of meeting strangers who unfold in front of you and become people you cannot wait to tell others about. How can you be expected to notice what is happening to your own life? ...and suddenly I look down and see that my feet are pawing strange dirt at the lip of a grave that maybe could be mine. And that is blinding speed."

At age 65 Breslin made a rare doctor's visit due to eye trouble. The eye is nothing, but the attendant MRI shows an entirely unrelated "bulge," which could be a life-threatening aneurysm.

Instantly Breslin recalls the Crown Heights riot after a black child was killed by a car driven by a Jew and a Jewish student was subsequently stabbed. Entering the area in a cab, Breslin was beaten and finally rescued. "The guy with the knife took me by the arm and led me through the crowd. The rest of me was reeling, a flag blowing in a stiff wind."

Breslin's eye was injured in the melee and he seizes on this as an explanation. His memory of the riot is pungent, urgent, but the doctor brushes it off.

The aneurysm confirmed, Breslin makes a joke. The doctor is amazed at his lack of understanding. But: "I also was treating it just as I do any horrible thing that occurs in a day. I report on a tragedy by remaining cold and callous and concentrate on making notes of the smallest details. In the hotel kitchen in Los Angeles, I counted Sirhan Sirhan kicking his legs five times before somebody sat on them after he shot Robert Kennedy."

As he educates himself about the aneurysm and his options, he recalls the deaths of others - Nelson Rockefeller, his beloved wife Rosemary, the New York stabbing of Martin Luther King and his assassination a decade later - and endures the kindness and shocking insensitivity of various friends and colleagues.

He recalls colorful characters from mob bosses to shady polls, rollicking nights in bars where he learned more than any journalism graduate sitting at a computer (he has the older generation's contempt for new ways).

He remembers the cold dread of being broke, the bitterness of his childhood, his own floundering lack of identity - always pretending to be someone else. And all of it in vivid anecdotes that rivet the reader to the page.

In contemplative moments he explores his relationship with God and the Catholic Church and researches the science of the mind, discovering that there isn't one.

And he name-drops a bit. Governor Mario Cuomo asks the state health commissioner to recommend a doctor for his case. On the other hand murderer David Berkowitz, "Son of Sam," once pointed him out, saying " 'That's Jimmy Breslin. He's a very good friend of mine.' "

Vintage Breslin, this is a compulsive page turner; funny, poignant and opinionated. His colorful, rushing style is quintessential New York and uniquely Breslin's.
I Want to Thank My Brain for Remembering Me: A Memoir ebook
Author:
Jimmy Breslin
Category:
Professionals & Academics
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1113 kb
FB2 size:
1426 kb
DJVU size:
1721 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Thorndike Pr; Large Print edition (April 1, 1997)
Pages:
374 pages
Rating:
4.4
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