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Hidden Evidence: Forty True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them ebook

by Thomas Noguchi MD,Kathy Reichs,David Owen


Hidden Evidence: 50 True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped . This book could also be called The Big Picture Book of Forensic Science or The First Book of Forensic Science.

Hidden Evidence: 50 True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them. Owen, a science writer, looks at how forensic science has developed and how techniques have evolved from methods of investigation used in ancient China to computerized DNA analysis.

Hidden Evidence book. This is a monumental work. Hidden Evidence: The Story of Forensic Science and How It Helped to Solve 40 of the World's Toughest Crimes. 1554075408 (ISBN13: 9781554075409).

Hidden Evidence takes you to the scenes of 40 infamous crimes and into the heart of the forensic investigations. These are the true crime shockers that have grabbed headlines and aroused public passions. David Owen explains the scientific procedures. David Owen explains the scientific procedures that helped crack every one of these cases - from the gathering of elusive physical clues to the examination of weapons and bodies, to the use of sophisticated scientific analysis.

Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Introduction - On the scene - Sect. 2. Weapons of the criminal - Poison - Knives - Strangulation - Drowning and burning - Sect

Includes bibliographical references and index. Weapons of the criminal - Poison - Knives - Strangulation - Drowning and burning - Sect. 3. Unmasking the criminal - Frauds and forgeries - Fingerprints and footprints - Blood - DNA - The future for forensic science.

Authors: David Owen Thomas T Noguchi Asha Savjani Kathy Reichs. Hidden Evidence presents the facts and steers clear of speculation.

50 True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them. ISBN-13: 9781554075409. Authors: David Owen Thomas T Noguchi Asha Savjani Kathy Reichs. more Tanya Laughton Carly Beckerman Donna Gregory.

David Owen (Author), Thomas T. Noguchi (Foreword), Kathy Reichs (Preface) & 0 more

David Owen (Author), Thomas T. Noguchi (Foreword), Kathy Reichs (Preface) & 0 more. Kathy Reichs is author of the best-selling murder mysteries "Déjà Dead" and Death du Jour. She is forensic anthropologist for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, State of North Carolina, and for the Laboratoire de Sciences Judiciaries et de Médecine légale, Québec. I wanted a book about forensic science that wasn't full of jargon to help me with a crime novel that I'm writing, and I picked this one up because it looked as if it might fit the bill.

David OWEN Hidden Evidence - Forty True Crimes & How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them (00) by Owen, David - (Foreword), Thomas T Noguchi - Reichs, Kathy. ISBN 13: 9780705431958.

Hidden Evidence: Forty True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them" by David Owen, Thomas . How to Win Friends and Influence People for Teen Girls" by Donna Dale Carnegie

Hidden Evidence: Forty True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them" by David Owen, Thomas T. Noguchi, and Kathy Reichs along the same lines as the other one. "I Never Met an Animal I Didn't Like" by Rory C. Foster about how a vet set up a treat injured wildlife. Chasing Lincoln's Killer" by James L. Swanson is about Lincoln's assination. How to Win Friends and Influence People for Teen Girls" by Donna Dale Carnegie. Teens Cook: How to Cook What You Want to Eat" by Meghan Carle, Jill Carle and Judi Carle. New Totally Awesome Business Book for Kids" by Arthur Bochner, Rose Bochner, Adriane G. Berg.

Even readers who already know something about forensic science are likely to learn from "Hidden Evidence" about historic cases that have been solved by science. Unfortunately, there are so few details provided in the book that the most interesting questions often remain unanswered. The book is full of pictures (I suspect that the illustrations were chosen before any narrative was written), and no references are provided. It might be of use to a student inspired by the TV program "Crime Scene Investigators" to consider a career in forensic chemistry.

Hidden Evidence: Forty true crimes and how forensic science helped solve them by David Owen (Firefly Books, September 2000). Murder! 25 True Australian Crimes by Vivien Encel & Alan Sharpe. This Australian biographical article related to crime is a stub.

Hidden Evidence takes you to the scenes of 40 infamous crimes and into the heart of the forensic investigations. These are the true crime shockers that have grabbed headlines and aroused public passions. David Owen explains the scientific procedures that helped crack every one of these cases -- from the gathering of elusive physical clues to the examination of weapons and bodies, to the use of sophisticated scientific analysis.

Threaded throughout the book is the history of forensic science and the technologies that support it, including: fingerprinting, autopsies, handwriting analysis, ballistics, hair sampling, blood typing, DNA testing, dental records, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, compound and electron microscopes, and toxicology.

The high-profile cases David Owen used to illustrate forensic developments are from as early as 1775, when Paul Revere used dentures to identify a slain soldier, to the latest developments in the Oklahoma bombing. Most will be familiar to readers, such as: The Lindbergh Kidnapping, Pan Am Flight 103, The Kennedy Investigation, The Hitler Diaries, Wayne Williams, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey MacDonald, Dr. Josef Mengele, Robert Maxwell's suicide, Tsar Nicholas II, and The World Trade Center bombing.

David Owen presents the facts, steering clear of speculation. Comprehensive in scope, thoroughly researched and expertly compiled, Hidden Evidence is, in the words of former Los Angeles County Coroner Thomas T. Noguchi, "a fascinating book ... [and] an excellent mini-encyclopedia of widely discussed, high-profile cases."

Impala Frozen
"Hidden Evidence" is a trade paperback that relies more on photographs than text, and some of the pictures are pretty gory. The is the first forensic science book I've read where there was actually a photograph of the aftermath of one of the 'Jack the Ripper' murders. David Owen has still assembled an interesting book. Some of the forty crimes that he uses as examples are well-known, e.g. Wayne Williams, the Atlanta child killer. Others will probably be unknown to the reader (Americans, at least). For instance, there are several gruesome goings-on Down Under that the author touches on, including the sixty-three-year-old auntie who liked to put thallium in her relatives' tea.
Although "Hidden Evidence" held my interest, I wish the author had gone into more detail about the forensic techniques that he describes and also more detail about some of the crimes. He skips from case to case so quickly that there is little room for suspense or a clear description of the amount of work it took to solve some of these crimes. I think the British have the edge over us Americans when it comes to writing true crime/forensic science books. One of my favorites is "Forty Years of Murder" by Professor Keith Simpson, who was the British Home Office pathologist for forty years. Another favorite is the biography of Bernard Spillsbury, who was Simpson's chief crime-solving rival.
Bumand
Pretty cool accounts !
ZEr0
Great job. Thank you
Ballazan
I'm always a little leary of saying a book like this is fun. I don't want people to think that forensics is anything but a serious science, and one that is unfortunately used way too often in this world. I've always wondered why I am fascinated by this particular field, and it worries me less it says something bad about me. However, I can say that of all the professions especially in the sciences, forensics is the one that comes nearest to being able to solve puzzles and mysteries and still manage to get paid for it! When I see a book like Owen's I find it is hard to put the book down. Like other reviewers, I wish the author had put more information in the book about the techniques and the crimes. I did not recognize some of the crimes, so when the author refers back to them it is difficult to understand where the technique was used. The photography and graphics were phenomenol. For someone like me, who is deaf, graphic presentation is as important as the written presentation of the science. I feel like the author got all these pictures (and that was a lot of work doing this research, because I have not seen many of the pictures before)and did a rush job on the writing part. The book is still very good, and I think this is a valid book to refer to for people who are deciding whether or not to go into the particular field as a career. It is basic, but it provides enough information and 'gore' to see if a person can stand dealing with the awful situations in which forensic scientists are called upon to view. I know in medical school I was a little leary of if I was going to be sick when we had to go down to the morgue, for fear I'd get sick or not be able to do my work. I found out that it didn't bother me (except for children)and it did bother my interpreters (went through 3 in less then a month!) It is imperative for people who are even considering this field to look at a book like this to see how squeamish they are in dealing with this stuff. I know too many people who tried to become doctors or nurses who had to quit because they could not deal with death and illness on a daily basis. How much more important is it for someone who will be exposed to violent death to decide whether this field is actually for them? This book would be a good career guide for this field. They no longer just use a coroner, but specialists in anthropology, entomology, firearms, photography, psychology, etc. and the need for these trained people is going to increase because of population increases. For the most part this was a good book, but be aware that the author does not give as much information about a lot of the crimes as many people want. This book is mainly about the science behind the police and prosecutors, and not about the crimes themselves. If the reader is interested in the crimes themselves, they will have to go elsewhere to find the information. Karen Sadler, Science Education, University of Pittsburgh
Eta
Forensic science began with the 17th century invention of the microscope, became even wider spread as a police crime solving tool with the 18th century invention of photography, was expanded in the 19th and 20th centuries to include everything from fingerprinting to DNA sampling. Hidden Evidence: Forty True Crimes And How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them showcases the history of this unique crime solving resource from 1775 and Paul Revere's use of the dentures he made to identify the body of Dr. Joseph Warren after the doctor had been fatally wounded at Bunker Hill, to 1923 when forensic scientist Edward Heinrich tracked down train robbers who had murdered an entire train crew in cold blood through a set of overalls. David Owen surveys the characteristics of all types of deaths from drowning and hanging to strangling and suffocating, the collection and use of various kinds of physical evident, numerous weapons, and more. Hidden Evidence is informative, engaging, highly recommended reading for anyone with an interest in the role forensic science has made for itself in crime detection and law enforcement from its inception to the present day.
Jogrnd
This book could also be called The Big Picture Book of Forensic Science or The First Book of Forensic Science. It seems like a picture book for adults, and the photo-to-text ratio is the main problem I had while reading this book.
The text seems to be an afterthought and there is no depth to it--just a bare recital of the facts of a particular case, forensic discipline, or procedure. The photos and illustrations more than compensate for the text, although many of them are gruesome [including the now-famous photo of Jack the Ripper's last victim, one of the most stunning crime scene photos of all time]. I've read about forensics for many years and this book was, to me, lame, but its just the basics text and great photos and illustrations make it an ideal book for someone who has no previous knowledge of forensics. It is a great introduction to the field.
Hidden Evidence: Forty True Crimes and How Forensic Science Helped Solve Them ebook
Author:
Thomas Noguchi MD,Kathy Reichs,David Owen
Category:
True Crime
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1779 kb
FB2 size:
1197 kb
DJVU size:
1118 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Firefly Books; First Edition edition (September 2, 2000)
Pages:
240 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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