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The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money ebook

by Timothy P. Carney


As shown in Timothy P. Carney's book The Big Rip off, our money lands in the pockets of big business from our government through our tax dollars. Before reading The Big Ripoff, I discovered the largest supporter of the Kyoto Protocol was Enron

As shown in Timothy P. Before reading The Big Ripoff, I discovered the largest supporter of the Kyoto Protocol was Enron. I began wondering if this was good for our environment, or was it just making a select few rich.

Tim Carney's new book describes how anti-business big business can b. -Lawrence Kudlow Host of CNBC's Kudlow & Company "Tim Carney explodes the myth that big business and big government are natural. -Lawrence Kudlow Host of CNBC's Kudlow & Company "Tim Carney explodes the myth that big business and big government are natural opponents. All too often, as he points out, they're both engaged in a common enterprise: picking your pocket.

Tim Carney explodes the myth that big business and big government are natural opponents. A romping tour de force of the love affair between big business and big government from Teddy Roosevelt and the Robber Barons to Enron and the Kyoto Treaty. Indispensable for understanding how government regulation really works.

The Big Ripoff pulls back the curtain to show who is strangling America's tradition of free enterprise and how and why they are doing it. Author Timothy Carney discusses how the incestuous relationship between big business and even bigger government works to the detriment o. . Author Timothy Carney discusses how the incestuous relationship between big business and even bigger government works to the detriment of consumers, taxpayers, and entrepreneurs.

He is the author of The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money and Obamanomics: How Barack Obama is Bankrupting You and Enriching His Wall Street Friends, Corporate Lobbyists, and Union Bosses. He lives in the Washington, .

Timothy Carney talked about his book The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money, published by Wiley

Timothy Carney talked about his book The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money, published by Wiley. Mr. Carney argued that big business and big government are working together to steal money from American consumers, taxpayers and entrepreneurs. He cited the death tax, clean fuel regulations and the reform of the welfare system as examples of how politicians and large corporations are threatening America’s tradition of free enterprise. The participants responded to audience members' questions

The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money. Every time government gets bigger, somebody’s getting rich.

The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money. With this astute observation, Tim Carney begins his task of laying bare the Obama administration’s corporatist governing strategy, hidden behind the president’s populist veneer.

The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money by Timothy P. Carney (Hoboken, . Frédéric Bastiat called it legal plunder when the state expropriated one set of property owners for the benefit of another

The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money by Timothy P. Frédéric Bastiat called it legal plunder when the state expropriated one set of property owners for the benefit of another. Whether it loots the workers to benefit the farmers, the farmers to benefit the workers, or everybody to benefit Boeing, the state damages and impoverishes society.

Praise for THE BIG RIPOFF "Politicians like to say that government is on the side of the little guy. But with impressive documentation and persuasive examples, Tim Carney shows how government power and regulation are typically used to assist the powerful." -Paul A. Gigot Editorial Page Editor, the Wall Street Journal "Exposes the dirty little secret of American politics: how big businesses work with statist politicians to diminish the prosperity and freedom of consumers, taxpayers, and entrepreneurs. Carney employs top-notch writing ability, passion for liberty, and understanding of economics to demolish the myth that big business is a foe of big government. Everyone who seeks to understand who really benefits from big government should read this book, as should anyone who still believes that the interventionist state benefits the average person." -Congressman Ron Paul U.S. House of Representatives, 14th District of Texas "Small entrepreneurial businesses are the backbone success of our great economy. They are the biggest job and wealth creators. Is that why big corpocratic behemoth firms collude with big government for a liberal agenda of higher taxes and overregulation that will punish the small risk-takers? Tim Carney's new book describes how anti-business big business can be." -Lawrence Kudlow Host of CNBC's Kudlow & Company "Tim Carney explodes the myth that big business and big government are natural opponents. All too often, as he points out, they're both engaged in a common enterprise: picking your pocket." -Ramesh Ponnuru Senior Editor, National Review "A romping tour de force of the love affair between big business and big government from Teddy Roosevelt and the Robber Barons to Enron and the Kyoto Treaty. Indispensable for understanding how government regulation really works." -Donald Devine Grewcock Professor of Political Science, Bellevue University "Every CEO in America should read this book today, issue new directives to their bureaucrat-appeasing Washington lobbyist tomorrow, and join in the fight for economic liberalization." -Fred L. Smith, Jr. Founder and President, Competitive Enterprise Institute
JOGETIME
There is a misconception by many that:

- Big business wants free markets
- Government protects us from big business
- Government regulations are intended to restrict big business
- Big business is more aligned with the political right than the political left

This book meticulously chronicles the mechanism by which big business partners with government in order to:

- subsidize its operations
- create its own government customers, both foreign and domestic
- eliminate the free market, and replace it with a corrupt one
- tilt the playing field so that small business has no chance
- control who wins elections

By the end, you realize that the government's primary function is to redistribute wealth from the middle class to the corporate class. You also realize we don't actually live in a free market. In a free market, the businesses that succeed are the ones who customers decide are providing value. In our system, the businesses that succeed are the ones who effectively suck money from taxpayers via the government, regardless of what they provide to the health of society.

This book is important because its message is unique. It is not the same tired old republican theories about trickle down economics or left-wing theories about the evils of the market. Thank you, Tim Carney, for advancing the debate past the usual left/right myths.
Rose Of Winds
Does anyone think that big businesses just want to be left alone by the government? If so, Mr. Carney's book should be an eye-opener.

Many corporations have found it to their advantage to troll for government subsidies and favors, to accept regulation of their industries on terms that will give them a competitive advantage, and even to support tax increases that will fuel the growth of government (particularly if someone else will bear the brunt of the increase).

Politicians welcome the support of wealthy contributors and are willing to do favors to get it. The characterization of one party being for big business and the other for the downtrodden is quite misleading.

These themes are illustrated by numerous examples - corporate welfare, regulatory schemes that deter new entrants, the tobacco settlement, etc. - that ring true and are convincingly documented. The final section about environmentalism for profit is particularly well done.

Enron, which some have cited as an example of private enterprise run amok, was quite adept at adapting to and profiting from government rules and policies. The company's accounting scams were designed to survive SEC scrutiny (short sellers were the first to notice that something was awry), it raised gaming the energy regulations of California to an art form, and it favored ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in hopes of becoming a player in the resulting cap-and-trade system.

Archer Daniels Midland has long benefited from government mandates and subsidies for ethanol, yet corn-based ethanol takes a lot of energy to produce (perhaps more than it provides) and the asserted environmental advantage over gasoline is illusory. The CEO is quoted as saying, when being pressed about acceptance of government aid, that "people who are not in the Midwest do not understand that this is a socialist country."

Other companies (e.g., General Electric and DuPont) hope to profit from "going green" in the future. They do not figure to make much progress without government support, however, and their motives are not necessarily altruistic.

Overall, The Big Ripoff leaves one with the perception of being victimized. I believe this impression is overdone, i.e., that many people in the business and government worlds are trying to contribute to the good of society even if their efforts fall short at times. It might also have been helpful if the author had offered some suggestions for making the situation better.
Gela
The Big Ripoff really explains why big companies go along with programs that are clearly detrimental to who they are and what they do. As an example; The Whiskey Rebellion of 1794 was prompted by the federal government's tax on whiskey. Who were the biggest supporters of that tax? It was the large distillers. Why? Who was the biggest supporter of the penalties and fines imposed on the tobacco industry in the law suit by the various states attorneys general? Phillip Morris! Why? Why is Warren Buffett one of the biggest supporters of death and inheritance taxes? Find these out and you begin to understand why companies are so hot to go "green".
Wetiwavas
If you've been distracted by the typical Republican vs. Democrat title bouts that seize headlines, then you're missing the really story about who's getting rich off our tax dollars.

To take just one example, Carney focuses his investigative talents upon General Electric to show how they've been lobbying government since the days of FDR- and getting billions in return. But, as Carney exposes time and time again, this is standard operating procedure inside the Beltway.

There is something terribly wrong with our political system, and while we can never get money out of politics, The Big Ripoff does an A+ job of following the money.
Malalrajas
Read it
Wnex
Excelent!!!
Just_paw
This book was more confused than a hippie in Alabama at a Crimson Tide Game in December. This book waste no time in bashing one side of the political isle and forgot all about the 1980s and the woeful waste of the both Bush Administration. Even where the book might be a god send in revealing real graft and corruption of Bill Clinton, it quietly continues to complain about spoils system politics. This book did live up to its title: The Big ripoff because it had very little original information and even less to say about the Fed or Republicans or Democrats cozy relationships, especially the Tom Delay and Jack Abramoff Scandal or the Democratic scandal involving William Jefferson's cold cash scandal. This book spend more time on circular griping and less time on naming actual names. What a waste of time and effort. Enron was over and yet the author forgot to mentioned Enron's cozy relationship with the George W. Bush Administration. DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY!!!!!!
The Big Ripoff: How Big Business and Big Government Steal Your Money ebook
Author:
Timothy P. Carney
Category:
Finance
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1323 kb
FB2 size:
1330 kb
DJVU size:
1631 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Wiley (July 11, 2006)
Pages:
285 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
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