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Chasing Cool: Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace ebook

by Gene Pressman,Johnny Heller,Noah Kerner


The book & Cool' is about standing out in today's cluttered marketplace. According to the authors, cool isn't just a state of mind-it's a business.

The book & Cool' is about standing out in today's cluttered marketplace. Us magazine is another success story. At first, Us magazine was a monthly magazine that was a complete flop.

Start by marking Chasing Cool: Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Combining Gene Pressman's revolutionary creative vision with Noah Kerner's marketing expertise, Chasing Cool digs beneath the surface and reveals how emphasizing long-lasting relevance trumps a fleeting preoccupation with what's hot and what's not.

Chasing Cool: Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace. Written by Gene Pressman and Noah Kerner. Narrated by Johnny Heller. This stunning reference includes interviews with more than seventy of today's most respected luminaries, from Tom Ford and Russell Simmons to Richard Meier and Bonnie Fuller.

Chasing Cool includes interviews with more than seventy of today's most respected innovators from Tom Ford .

Chasing Cool includes interviews with more than seventy of today's most respected innovators from Tom Ford and Russell Simmons to Ian Schrager and Christina Aguilera. Simply chasing cool is really a bad idea; inspired by cool is a great idea. Walk the street, see what's going on, and spit it out in your own way.

Noah Kerner, Gene Pressman. Simply chasing cool is really a bad idea; inspired by cool is a great idea

Noah Kerner, Gene Pressman.

CHASING COOL Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace. Johnny Heller does a professionally "cool" job of presenting the information, but if the authors wanted to be really cool, they would have distilled this down to a ten-minute podcast. by Noah Kerner, Gene Pressman Read by Johnny Heller. Authors Kerner and Pressman seem to have mastered it for this audiobook.

Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace. By Noah Kerner and Gene Pressman

Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace. By Noah Kerner and Gene Pressman. In this wide-ranging exploration the authors Noah Kerner, a celebrated marketing maverick, and Gene Pressman, legendary creative visionary and former co-CEO of Barneys New York, have uncovered surprising and universal patterns and trends. They systematically parse the successes and failures of the last few decades-in music and fashion, magazines and food, spirits and hip-hop culture. Their discoveries are pulled together in this definitive book on the commerce of cool.

Kerner, Noah; Pressman, Gene; Essex, Andrew. New York : Atria Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 17, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

In their new book Chasing Cool, Kerner and Pressman take the reader on an insightful journey revealing the most fundamental reasons why some brands, companies, gadgets, ideas hit the cool target.

In their new book Chasing Cool, Kerner and Pressman take the reader on an insightful journey revealing the most fundamental reasons why some brands, companies, gadgets, ideas hit the cool target - while others fall drastically short. Making for a more colorful and poignant chronicle, nearly 100 celebrities and successful brand-persons are interviewed and the insight they provide is often simple, sometimes comical, but surprisingly almost always profound

The former creative director and co-CEO of Barneys joins forces with a celebrated twenty-eight-year-old marketing maverick to teach readers how to break through the clutter and achieve a relevant point of difference in this entertaining and imminently readable book.Cool isn't just a state of mind, a celebrity fad, or an American obsession-it's a business. Combining Gene Pressman's revolutionary creative vision with Noah Kerner's marketing expertise, Chasing Cool digs beneath the surface and reveals how emphasizing long-lasting relevance trumps a fleeting preoccupation with what's hot and what's not.Although other books have zeroed in on a single aspect of the cool factor, Chasing Cool expands the playing field by including interviews with business icons, in-depth research, and personal anecdotes. This stunning reference includes interviews with more than seventy of today's most respected luminaries, from Tom Ford and Russell Simmons to Richard Meier and Bonnie Fuller. In a multidimensional, entertaining, and imminently readable book that redefines how to appeal to today's savvy consumer, Pressman and Kerner explore the lessons to be learned by America's shortsighted search for the ever-popular concept of cool.
Aria
Seriously excellent read!!
Wanenai
With authenticity as its battle cry, "Chasing Cool" was a textbook that didn't feel like a textbook. Kerner's narrative took me back to feeling anything is possible when one dreams. Go big: make sure to read this first.
Flower
The book `Chasing Cool' is about standing out in today's cluttered marketplace. According to the authors, cool isn't just a state of mind--it's a business. In boardrooms across America, product managers are examining vodka bottles and candy bars, tissue boxes and hamburgers, wondering how do we make this thing cool? How do we make this gadget into the iPod of our industry?

The authors argue that we should be inspired by cool. Cool things lead to big profits. Apple's iPod, for example, is cool. Remember the Sony Walkman of the 70s? It was cool. But the iPod is cooler. You can carry around with you over 20,000 songs (depending on the model), and have enough room to fit a few music videos and blockbuster movies. iPods are so cool, everyone wants to own one. In fact, the crime rate in New York City increased by 30% because of iPod thefts.

Podcasts are the direct result of iPods, and named after them. iPods makes it easy to download podcasts from the internet and listen to them on the go. Apple's iPod opened a whole new way of communication. Even YouTube videos could be transferred to an iPod! The iPod has become the icon of what cool is all about. Companies now ask, "How can we make our product into an iPod?" In other words, what should companies do to make a product as successful as an iPod?

Us magazine is another success story. At first, Us magazine was a monthly magazine that was a complete flop. The editors had no idea what the magazine should stand for. Then a new editor was hired, and she turned the magazine around into something cool. She made the magazine a weekly publication, emphasizing the things she likes. In other words, she made a magazine for herself. She was her own customer. Us magazine suddenly rose in stature and sales, and advertisers flocked to it. Stars are just like us, and Us magazine portrays them as such. For example, Us magazine will have pictures of Catherine Zeta Jones sticking her finger up her nose, and of Britney Spears' dirty fingernails. That made the magazine cool, and the magazine rose to 1.6 million prints in circulation.

The iPod was not the first mp3 on the market, nor the first portable music player. The Sony Walkman, back in the 1970s, was the first portable music player; what the iPod is today. But Sony was not able to keep its Sony Walkman cool, and soon lost out to the iPod. Still before the iPod came the Rio. But it was not cool enough and lost out to the iPod. What the authors are trying to say is that being the first to launch a product is not always the best thing. Their advice is not to aim to be first, but rather to aim to excel at what the company does. First is a dangerous place to be. Come second, and make something better. Follow other companies footsteps, but don't aim to be the leader. It is better to follow someone else's footsteps, and learn from their mistakes, than to have others follow your footsteps and eventually become better than you.

The iPod has truly become a phenomenon, and the authors keep repeating this and using its success as an example in all their arguments. You can now find built-in connections to your iPod in cars, and even on my Honda Goldwing. U2 and Eminem partnered with the iPod! And hey, you can even buy a Jeans with a built-in iPod! How cool is that?

Is your company a slave to today's trends? The authors warn against creating for today. A company should have the vision to create for tomorrow--to seek out what will be cool tomorrow. Hip Hop, for example, has become the iPod of the music world. No one thought Hip Hop will survive. This made the singers more rebellious. Snoop Dog is a perfect example. It is all about giving people what they like; giving them what they think is cool!

The authors say that companies can find out what is cool, and therefore what the new trends are, from the internet and especially in chatting rooms. All the clues to the new trends are here today. It is like a puzzle that must be put together.

Some companies actually fire their employees if they don't make mistakes. Mistakes mean they are making something new. A company can only thrive in doing new things, as opposed to stagnating on the same old thing. Polaroid is a perfect example. They were not quick enough to realize that the cool thing was digital photography. Though they were the first in instant imaging, digital imaging became the next cool thing in photography. Other companies beat them to it! This demonstrates again that being first is not necessary good.

All companies should have trend reports. The US President gets a report everyday on world events. Similarly, companies should receive reports on what the cool trends are. According to the authors, buzz can be bought; consumers can be bought as well. You can spread contiguous info through the internet. To do that, companies hire their own ambassadors to spread a buzz.

Where stars go, people follow. For example, restaurants that Paris Hilton frequents are deemed to be hot. Similarly, a brand watch is deemed hot if worn by a star. Stars do sometimes create trends, and companies should keep a watchful eye on them.

The authors warn against having people wait outside a discotheque for the sole reason of creating a show or an artificial demand. People will go inside the discotheque and find it empty, and this will backfire on the discotheque's coolness. The name of the game is to remain cool, and you cannot do that by deception.

The authors say that if you want to make luxury make it and shut up. Don't advertise the fact that you are making a luxury. Doing so is like a woman boosting that she is beautiful. Besides, what is luxury? What makes a product a luxurious item? Is it its price?

You'll often hear people complaining that music nowadays is not as good as it used to be. The question you should be asking is, `who's asking?' In most likelihood the person complaining is not as young as he used to be. Music is different than it used to be, not better or worse. What was cool yesterday is no longer cool today. Can you see teenagers nowadays listening to Louis Armstrong?

There is a good chapter on risk taking vs. risk management. All companies must take risk, but it should be managed risk. If you think about risk, you would never be able to create. You must face risk to succeed. Take big risks but with risk management. You have to reinvent yourself or you will lose market share.

Less is better; less is more. Tommy Hilfiger is an excellent example of this. They over expanded, and Tommy's apparel became too abundant, available in every department store. They also over advertized. This made it not cool. Customers lost interest in it. The authors recommend to pull back on the reins. Many companies went out of business by over doing it.

I really liked what Christina Aguilera had to say about staying cool. According to her, a singer should not repeat the same style of music over and over again. She also says that being in the public eye means being out of the fans' imagination. She doesn't go to too many parties anymore, for not only does partying keep her in the public arena, but also away from creative work.

The authors say that the only way to stay cool is to kill yourself when you are hot. Sounds pretty drastic! They cite James Dean as an example. Their advice: Stage your own death. Don't live long enough to spoil your image. I'm sure by this they mean your product!

A person might not be cool, but what he does can be cool. Cool must stick.

Cool is to be relevant. Chasing somebody else's cool is a mistake. Christina Aguilera is cool. But having Barbara Streisand dress like Aguilera and sing her songs is not cool!

This is a really great book and is very easy and quick to read. I really recommend it. It was fun reading it!
Iaran
What's cool today? Great question. What I might think is cool is totally different from what a 30 year old thinks is cool, which is different from a 17 year-old's perspective. Most companies want to have their brands perceived as cool, but if they try too hard, they risk having the "pursuit of cool" backfire on them, and in fact their products become very uncool.

The authors, who must be cool because they keep saying so throughout the book, talk about the pursuit of cool, and how products that are currently considered cool, were able to attain this status. Even though I am not mentioned in this book, and therefore must not be cool, I do recommend this as a fast read, and one that will help you better understand the risks of fads, and the risk of wanting your product or service to be seen as hip. I think you might enjoy this book.
Nten
Fun read. It gives you examples from some of the biggest success stories in the business. READ IT NOW!
I love the format of this book. I typically can't read business books but this was amazing!
Skrimpak
This book is for a class that I have, but it's been a good read. Very practical and applicable to the Public Relations world. And it's not boring.
Gavinrage
The book `Chasing Cool' is about standing out in today's cluttered marketplace. According to the authors, cool isn't just a state of mind--it's a business. In boardrooms across America, product managers are examining vodka bottles and candy bars, tissue boxes and hamburgers, wondering how do we make this thing cool? How do we make this gadget into the iPod of our industry?

The authors argue that we should be inspired by cool. Cool things lead to big profits. Apple's iPod, for example, is cool. Remember the Sony Walkman of the 70s? It was cool. But the iPod is cooler. You can carry around with you over 20,000 songs (depending on the model), and have enough room to fit a few music videos and blockbuster movies. iPods are so cool, everyone wants to own one. In fact, the crime rate in New York City increased by 30% because of iPod thefts.

Podcasts are the direct result of iPods, and named after them. iPods makes it easy to download podcasts from the internet and listen to them on the go. Apple's iPod opened a whole new way of communication. Even YouTube videos could be transferred to an iPod! The iPod has become the icon of what cool is all about. Companies now ask, "How can we make our product into an iPod?" In other words, what should companies do to make a product as successful as an iPod?

Us magazine is another success story. At first, Us magazine was a monthly magazine that was a complete flop. The editors had no idea what the magazine should stand for. Then a new editor was hired, and she turned the magazine around into something cool. She made the magazine a weekly publication, emphasizing the things she likes. In other words, she made a magazine for herself. She was her own customer. Us magazine suddenly rose in stature and sales, and advertisers flocked to it. Stars are just like us, and Us magazine portrays them as such. For example, Us magazine will have pictures of Catherine Zeta Jones sticking her finger up her nose, and of Britney Spears' dirty fingernails. That made the magazine cool, and the magazine rose to 1.6 million prints in circulation.

The iPod was not the first mp3 on the market, nor the first portable music player. The Sony Walkman, back in the 1970s, was the first portable music player; what the iPod is today. But Sony was not able to keep its Sony Walkman cool, and soon lost out to the iPod. Still before the iPod came the Rio. But it was not cool enough and lost out to the iPod. What the authors are trying to say is that being the first to launch a product is not always the best thing. Their advice is not to aim to be first, but rather to aim to excel at what the company does. First is a dangerous place to be. Come second, and make something better. Follow other companies footsteps, but don't aim to be the leader. It is better to follow someone else's footsteps, and learn from their mistakes, than to have others follow your footsteps and eventually become better than you.

The iPod has truly become a phenomenon, and the authors keep repeating this and using its success as an example in all their arguments. You can now find built-in connections to your iPod in cars, and even on my Honda Goldwing. U2 and Eminem partnered with the iPod! And hey, you can even buy a Jeans with a built-in iPod! How cool is that?

Is your company a slave to today's trends? The authors warn against creating for today. A company should have the vision to create for tomorrow--to seek out what will be cool tomorrow. Hip Hop, for example, has become the iPod of the music world. No one thought Hip Hop will survive. This made the singers more rebellious. Snoop Dog is a perfect example. It is all about giving people what they like; giving them what they think is cool!

The authors say that companies can find out what is cool, and therefore what the new trends are, from the internet and especially in chatting rooms. All the clues to the new trends are here today. It is like a puzzle that must be put together.

Some companies actually fire their employees if they don't make mistakes. Mistakes mean they are making something new. A company can only thrive in doing new things, as opposed to stagnating on the same old thing. Polaroid is a perfect example. They were not quick enough to realize that the cool thing was digital photography. Though they were the first in instant imaging, digital imaging became the next cool thing in photography. Other companies beat them to it! This demonstrates again that being first is not necessary good.

All companies should have trend reports. The US President gets a report everyday on world events. Similarly, companies should receive reports on what the cool trends are. According to the authors, buzz can be bought; consumers can be bought as well. You can spread contiguous info through the internet. To do that, companies hire their own ambassadors to spread a buzz.

Where stars go, people follow. For example, restaurants that Paris Hilton frequents are deemed to be hot. Similarly, a brand watch is deemed hot if worn by a star. Stars do sometimes create trends, and companies should keep a watchful eye on them.

The authors warn against having people wait outside a discotheque for the sole reason of creating a show or an artificial demand. People will go inside the discotheque and find it empty, and this will backfire on the discotheque's coolness. The name of the game is to remain cool, and you cannot do that by deception.

The authors say that if you want to make luxury make it and shut up. Don't advertise the fact that you are making a luxury. Doing so is like a woman boosting that she is beautiful. Besides, what is luxury? What makes a product a luxurious item? Is it its price?

You'll often hear people complaining that music nowadays is not as good as it used to be. The question you should be asking is, `who's asking?' In most likelihood the person complaining is not as young as he used to be. Music is different than it used to be, not better or worse. What was cool yesterday is no longer cool today. Can you see teenagers nowadays listening to Louis Armstrong?

There is a good chapter on risk taking vs. risk management. All companies must take risk, but it should be managed risk. If you think about risk, you would never be able to create. You must face risk to succeed. Take big risks but with risk management. You have to reinvent yourself or you will lose market share.

Less is better; less is more. Tommy Hilfiger is an excellent example of this. They over expanded, and Tommy's apparel became too abundant, available in every department store. They also over advertized. This made it not cool. Customers lost interest in it. The authors recommend to pull back on the reins. Many companies went out of business by over doing it.

I really liked what Christina Aguilera had to say about staying cool. According to her, a singer should not repeat the same style of music over and over again. She also says that being in the public eye means being out of the fans' imagination. She doesn't go to too many parties anymore, for not only does partying keep her in the public arena, but also away from creative work.

The authors say that the only way to stay cool is to kill yourself when you are hot. Sounds pretty drastic! They cite James Dean as an example. Their advice: Stage your own death. Don't live long enough to spoil your image. I'm sure by this they mean your product!

A person might not be cool, but what he does can be cool. Cool must stick.

Cool is to be relevant. Chasing somebody else's cool is a mistake. Christina Aguilera is cool. But having Barbara Streisand dress like Aguilera and sing her songs is not cool!

This is a really great book and is very easy and quick to read. I really recommend it. It was fun reading it!
The delivery and quality of the book were spot on. And the book is good but a little bit cliche.
Chasing Cool: Standing Out in Today's Cluttered Marketplace ebook
Author:
Gene Pressman,Johnny Heller,Noah Kerner
Category:
Marketing & Sales
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1645 kb
FB2 size:
1104 kb
DJVU size:
1768 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (May 15, 2007)
Rating:
4.4
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