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Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution ebook

by Ji-li Jiang


Ji-li’s deeply moving story should be on the shelf of every person’s library.

Ji-li’s deeply moving story should be on the shelf of every person’s library. Her courage in the face of adversity and her steadfast loyalty and love for her family are truly inspirational for young and old alike. Nien Chang, author of A Life and Death in Shanghai). I can only hope I would have shown the same decency and courage exhibited by Ji-li Jiang. The Cultural Revolution has labeled all people in the Landlord class as Enemies of the People, even though landlords as such are extinct in modern Communist China. Acquiring property to build family wealth has a long tradition in Asia, so the number of people with ancestors who owned property is obviously considerable.

Red Scarf Girl is a historical memoir written by Ji-li Jiang about her experiences during the Cultural Revolution of China, with a foreword by David Henry Hwang. Ji-li Jiang was very important in her classroom and was respected until 1966 when the Cultural Revolution started. In Red Scarf Girl, Ji-li was at the top of her class and the da-dui-zhang, or Student Council President, of her school.

Sweeping - Epilogue - Glossary. An outstanding student and much admired leader of her class, Ji-Li Jiang was poised for a shining future in the Communist party until the Cultural Revolution of 1966.

Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution

Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution. 0439063000 (ISBN13: 9780439063005). All in all, I enjoyed reading about Ji-Li Jiang’s transformation from a young woman blindly following Chairman Mao’s edicts, to first questioning the Revolution when her family was affected, and ultimately opposing it and leaving China to move to the United States. Bu. es, the havoc that the Chinese Cultural Revolution wrought on families was frightening. Yes, it was terrible what happened to Jiang and her family, but I wonder what kind of person she would have become had she been part of one of the lucky red families.

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Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution. Moving, honest, and deeply personal, Red Scarf Girl is the incredible true story of one girl’s courage and determination during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century. It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, popularity, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution-and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart

Ji-li Jiang, the writer and main character of the Red Scarf Girl, was a girl who grew up in China. A Real Panorama of the Cultural Revolution. com User, May 18, 2000.

Ji-li Jiang, the writer and main character of the Red Scarf Girl, was a girl who grew up in China. The Cultural Revolution, started by Mao Ze-dong, began the year Ji-li turned 12 years old, in 1966. Her early life was joyful. Ji-li was respected because she was intelligent and she was trusted. Red Scarf Girl is an excellent book wrote by author Ji-Li Jiang, who grew up in Communist China, facing all of the downfalls of the political party, and ending up being criticized by everyone just because of her family's political background.

Электронная книга "Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution", Ji-li Jiang. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

An outstanding student and much admired leader of her class, Ji-Li Jiang was poised for a shining future in the Communist party until the Cultural Revolution of 1966. Told with simplicity, innocence and grace, this unforgettable memoir gives a child's eye view of a terrifying time in 20th-century history-and of one family's indomitable courage under fire. ALA 1998 Notable Children's Book; ALA 1998 Best Books for Young Adults. 19 people like this topic

Red Scarf Girl is the memoir of young a young girl living during the Cultural Revolution, her name is Ji-Li Jiang. Ji-li Jiang was 12 years old when the Cultural Revolution began

Red Scarf Girl is the memoir of young a young girl living during the Cultural Revolution, her name is Ji-Li Jiang. At the start, Ji-Li was the top student in her class who encouraged anything having to do with the current revolution. As the story progresses, Ji-Li struggles with her class status because her grandfather was once a landlord. Ji-li Jiang was 12 years old when the Cultural Revolution began. She went from being a tar pupil and happy kid to being rejected due to her "black status"-relating to her 30-years-deceased grandfather's long ago status as a landlord. A family history she knew nothing about.

Publishers Weekly Best Book * ALA Best Book for Young Adults * ALA Notable Children's Book * ALA Booklist Editors' Choice

In the tradition of The Diary of Anne Frank and I Am Malala, this is the incredible true story of one girl’s courage and determination during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century. This edition includes a detailed glossary, pronunciation guide, discussion questions, and a Q&A with the author.

It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, popularity, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution—and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart.

Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. And when Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life.

Written in an accessible and engaging style, this page-turning, honest, and deeply personal autobiography will appeal to readers of all ages.

Marige
This is NOT a book about the "big picture" of what happened in Communist China during the Cultural Revolution. Rather, it is a memoir of the lives of a young girl and her family and her friends' families. For the Chinese people, society's rules about what is good and bad were reversed, first when the Communists conquered China in 1949, and then the reversal was emphasized seventeen years later, when the Cultural Revolution began. The result was that families who, before Communism, had worked hard and intelligently and had prospered suddenly became national enemies. Even those who had chosen not to flee China, out of a strong sense of Chinese patriotism, like the author's parents and grandparents, were declared by the state to be "enemies of the people". Even worse, no way was allowed for such a family to "make up" for its past, and even the children who were born into Communism, like the author and her siblings and friends, were declared to be guilty of the "crimes" of their ancestors. For the author, the Cultural Revolution was a turning point in her life. Until then, her parents and grandmother had kept their heads down and been left alone, but now they were denounced and actively persecuted. What the author was seeing daily in her life conflicted with the propaganda she was getting at school, which, before, she had accepted without question. Now her confusion kept increasing, as she tried to make sense of her new world. Finally, she was told bluntly that she had to choose between her country and her family, and only if she publicly rejected her family could she have the life she had always expected to have. Of course this was an agonizing decision, and took much time, but she finally made her choice.

The book is well-written, and does an excellent job of showing life in this tumultuous time as seen by a highly intelligent girl who was only twelve years old when the Cultural Revolution began. I highly recommend it.
Skillet
China’s Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s was hugely disruptive, and is now universally recognized as a giant step backwards for China. This is an intimate personal memoir about the life and impressions of a young teenage girl who lived through that time. This is not just a general history of events. The author shares her feelings, fears, and concerns and those of her extended family. The story is well and simply told from a personal perspective and is an easy narrative to follow, but it ends somewhat incomplete.

Ji-Li is growing up in a typical (for Chinese society) extended family, all sharing one household—the author and her two sisters, her parents, and her grandmother. At the beginning of the story, her family seems secure if not well-off, but their fortunes fall as the sometimes-anarchic “revolution” progresses. Although her father has a relatively uncontroversial occupation, every member of the family has been classified as a Landlord, simply because the family’s grandfather once owned property. The Cultural Revolution has labeled all people in the Landlord class as Enemies of the People, even though “landlords” as such are extinct in modern Communist China. Acquiring property to build family wealth has a long tradition in Asia, so the number of people with ancestors who owned property is obviously considerable.

Asian culture is by tradition family-centered. In some countries (North Korea comes to mind as one of the more severe modern examples), the punishments for one person’s “transgressions” are visited on the entire family, often for several generations. These transgressions are sometimes purely political. Even if being a “landlord” was ever a crime, Ji-Li had nothing to do with it. Yet despite the fact that Ji-Li is smart, hard-working in school, and ambitious, she suffers personal humiliations and penalties simply because she is part of this family.

Ji-Li is not anti-government, and wants to be a part of Mao’s revolution, but it won’t let her unless she is ultimately willing to make a difficult choice. Ji-Li’s fortitude almost fails her a few times, but in general she remains optimistic and determined. She is remarkably steadfast for such a young person. The story ends on a positive but mixed note, and it is clear that her experiences are not over yet.

Although I am an older adult and found that this easily held my interest, I also think this is definitely appropriate, interesting, and accessible reading for even young teens.
Ishnllador
"Red Scarf Girl" by Ji-li Jiang ... 4-stars

I'll be honest... I wanted to give this a five-star rating, but the writing itself was just not up to that caliber. It was, however, an interesting and informative story of Chinese families enduring the harsh conditions of the Mao Revolution in China. It's also a very interesting and informative human history of how easily people can be 'brainwashed' into believing half-truths and lies.

This story reminds me a little of another similar story, "The Plum Tree" set in Germany before and during Nazi Germany and war. Many normal, peace-loving Germans were also 'brainwashed' by Hitler and his henchmen. Humans can be so easily turned, one group against another - it's happened so many times in our past history, and it'll be done again and again in our future. Sad, truly sad.

Patrick
Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution ebook
Author:
Ji-li Jiang
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1409 kb
FB2 size:
1954 kb
DJVU size:
1507 kb
Language:
Publisher:
HarperTeen; Reprint edition (January 23, 2018)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
rtf mbr doc mbr
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