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Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 50, 2 Peter, Jude (bauckham), 377pp ebook

by Richard J. Bauckham


Jude-2 Peter, Volume 50 . .

Jude-2 Peter, Volume 50 .has been added to your Cart. Richard J. Bauckham is Lecturer in the History of Christian Thought at the Univeristy of Manchester, England. degrees from the University of Cambridge. He has published articles in The Journal of Theological Studies, The Reformed Journal, Evangelical Quarterly, and Tyndale Bulletin, and is a specialist in the area of eschatology and apocalypticism.

2 Peter and Jude Richard J. Bauckham. Book Details Bauckham treats Jude first because he dates the book very early, no later that . 50. He does not see any evidence of Paulinism nor the early catholicism found in later letters. Pages: 388 Publisher: Thomas Nelson Published: 1983 ISBN-10: 0849902495 ISBN-13: 9780849902499. Bauckham treats Jude first because he dates the book very early, no later that . Jude is the brother of Jesus and the letter reflects an apocalyptic Palestinian Judaism.

The work includes an introduction to each book, discussing the origin, authorship, and linguistics. This work goes on to analyze the epistles verse by verse, drawing out the theological themes and statements. This is a good text for any scholar interested in these epistles

It is scholarly in its approach and does an excellent job of interacting with the Greek text as well as discussing the pros and cons of the differing interpretations of the various passages.

Richard J.

Introduction - covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Pericope Bibliography - a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Bauckham FBA FRSE (born 22 September 1946) is an English Anglican scholar in theology, historical theology and New . Waco, TX: Word Books. Bauckham FBA FRSE (born 22 September 1946) is an English Anglican scholar in theology, historical theology and New Testament studies, specialising in New Testament Christology and the Gospel of John. He is a senior scholar at Ridley Hall, Cambridge. In 2006, Bauckham published Jesus and the Eyewitnesses, described by many scholars as a paradigm shift in Gospels study.

Word Biblical Themes: Jude, 2 Peter. by Richard J. ISBN 9780849907920 (978-0-8499-0792-0) Hardcover, W Pub Group, 1990. 844 printed pages. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology.

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship.

Jwalextell
The most detailed commentary I have read.
Adrielmeena
These two books, among the more neglected ones in the New Testament, are discussed competently by Richard Bauckham in his commentary. Some conservative scholars will find his denial of the Petrine authorship of 2 Peter disturbing. However, even if one ultimately rejects his position, it is worth considering, for in it Bauckham marshals an impressive amount of evidence against the Petrine authorship of this book. For those who hold to the traditional view of authorship (as I do), Bauckham's arguments are not always easy to answer.

Bauckham also has a number of interesting discussions on Jude. His comments on "The Testament of Moses" (the "Assumption of Moses"), the apparent source of Jude 9, are fascinating, as is his account of Jude's quotation from 1 Enoch, which forms the basis for Jude's comments in vv. 14-16.

This commentary is accessible enough that both the scholar and layperson will benefit.
Ger
Richard Bauckham wrote this commentary more than 30 years ago. It remains one of the best commentaries on these two sometimes neglected NT books. Written in a scholarly though readable fashion, Bauckham addresses all the important issues of interpretation of the text in both books, and also presents a detailed analysis of other crucial issues regarding these two books.

Some may find Bauckham's denial of the Petrine authorship of 2 Peter disturbing. Although his arguments do not fully convince me, they are definitely interesting and well reasoned. Even if one ultimately rejects his position, it is worth considering, for Bauckham marshals an impressive amount of evidence against the Petrine authorship of this book. For those who hold to the traditional authorial view (as I do), Bauckham's arguments are not always easy to answer.

One of the highlights of Bauckham's commentary on Jude is his discussion of "The Testament of Moses" (the "Assumption of Moses"), which is the apparent source of Jude 9. Also of note is his account of Jude's quotation from 1 Enoch, which forms the basis for Jude's comments in vv. 14-16.

Although the serious scholar is likely to derive the most benefit from this commentary, it is clearly enough written that someone wishing to get an overview of one or both of these books will benefit as well.
Tygrafym
Jude is clearly one of the most neglected books of the NT. Second Peter is not far behind. Richard Bauckham's commentary, now (2013) in print for more than thirty years, goes a long way in correcting this neglect. Written in a scholarly though readable fashion, Bauckham addresses all the important issues of interpretation of the text in both books, and also presents a detailed analysis of other crucial issues regarding these two books.

For some conservative scholars, his denial of the Petrine authorship of 2 Peter will prove disturbing. Although I am not fully convinced by his argument, I find it interesting and well reasoned. Even if one ultimately rejects his position, it is worth considering, for in it Bauckham marshals an impressive amount of evidence against the Petrine authorship of this book. For those who hold to the traditional authorial view (as I do), Bauckham's arguments are not always easy to answer.

Those interested in Jude will find Bauckham's discussion of "The Testament of Moses" (the "Assumption of Moses"), the apparent source of Jude 9, to be fascinating, and will also find a detailed account of Jude's quotation from 1 Enoch, which forms the basis for Jude's comments in vv. 14-16.

Although the serious scholar is likely to derive the most benefit from this commentary, it is clearly enough written that someone wishing to get an overview of one or both of these books will benefit as well.
Opilar
A volume in the Word Biblical Commentary. A great value of this volume is the extensive backgrounds Bauckham provides. He refers to many other writings, as well as trends of the day, that provide insights into Jude and Peter's message. Both are somewhat ambiguous and cryptic, and chapter 2 of 2 Peter resembles the single chapter of Jude considerably.

Bauckham discusses the various Jewish apocalyptic writings that have been considered the sources of Jude's puzzling reference to the Archangel Michael arguing with Satan over the body of Moses at the time of his death. This fascinating story is referred to in several popular writings of the first century and later.

Bauckham settles on the Testament of Moses, known in an expanded, rewritten later form as the Assumption of Moses as the written source of this Jewish folk tale. This is one of a whole genre of popular stories developed in the Jewish community from Maccabean times into the Middle Ages, providing variations on Old Testaments events. Some attempt to fill in gaps or clarify anomalies in the Torah stories.

See two other collections of some of these oral stories, Legends of the Bible, by Louis Ginzberg and Hebrew Myths -- The Book of Genesis, by Robert Graves and Raphael Patai. Many of these stories were written down over the centuries in various Rabbinic collections, the Haggadah, and other popular Jewish writings.

Bauckham also accounts for the similarity between 2 Peter and Jude differently than most commentators. He proposes that Jude was written first, placing it much earlier than some commentators, with Peter referring to Jude in the general topic of apocalyptic judgement of the false teachers, borrowing many specific phrases.

One factor that makes me question this is the fact that Peter used the future tense in speaking of the presence of these antinomian teachers among the believers, while Jude speaks as if they are currently present. This seems to be a strong indication of 2 Peter's priority to Jude.

Bauckham provides excellent and extensive commentary on word meaning and usage in Jude. He determines that Jude has a very high, though colloquial style of Greek, and shows familiarity with much Hellenistic and Greek classical literature.

On the other hand, it appears that Jude quotes from Old Testament references in the Hebrew, rather than the Septuagint. Jude seems very familiar, likewise, with current Jewish literature, though he is obviously writing in Greek to a Greek-speaking audience.
Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 50, 2 Peter, Jude  (bauckham), 377pp ebook
Author:
Richard J. Bauckham
Category:
Bible Study & Reference
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1842 kb
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1666 kb
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Publisher:
Word Books (February 15, 1983)
Pages:
384 pages
Rating:
4.8
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