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Ministering Cross-Culturally: An Incarnational Model for Personal Relationships ebook

by Marvin K. Mayers,Sherwood G. Lingenfelter


Sherwood G. Lingenfelter (P. University of Pittsburgh) is senior professor of anthropology and provost emeritus at Fuller Theological Seminary. Marvin K. Mayers (P.

Antoni in the Kitchen" by Antoni Porowski Antoni's dishes prove that sometimes simple is anything but simplistic. Sherwood G. University of Chicago) has taught for many years in the intercultural studies department of Biola University.

Ministering Cross-Culturally book . In Ministering Cross-Culturally, Sherwood Lingenfelter deals with the tension and conflict that is experienced in cross-cultural ministry by using the incarnation as a model.

Ministering Cross-Culturally: A Model for Effective Personal Relationships With more than 125,000 copies in print, this model for effective personal relationships in a multicultural an. .

Ministering Cross-Culturally: A Model for Effective Personal Relationships. by Sherwood G. Lingenfelter and Marvin K. Mayers. With more than 125,000 copies in print, this model for effective personal relationships in a multicultural and multiethnic world has proven successful for many.

Lingenfelter, Sherwood G; Mayers, Marvin Keene, 1927 .

Lingenfelter, Sherwood G; Mayers, Marvin Keene, 1927-. Missions, Intercultural communication. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger1 on September 27, 2011.

Marvin K Mayer's basic-values model, which he has greatly refined since publishing in 1974, provides the theoretical base for this approach to improving relationships between people of different cultures. Numerous illustrations drawn from Sherwood Lingenfelter's years in Yap serve to ground and enliven the discussion. In evaluating the cultural differences highlighted in the model of basic values, the authors draw heavily on the Bible.

In Ministering Cross-Culturally, the authors demonstrate that Jesus . Drawing from the authors' rich experience on the mission field, this book.

In Ministering Cross-Culturally, the authors demonstrate that Jesus needed to learn and understand the culture in which he lived before he could undertake his public ministry. The authors examine how this can help us better understand what it means to establish relationships of grace with those from different cultural and social backgrounds. Drawing from the authors' rich experience on the mission field, this book will benefit anyone who wants to be salt and light in a multicultural and multiethnic world.

Ministering Cross-Culturally: An Incarnational Model for Personal Relationships. Customs of the World: Using Cultural Intelligence to Adapt, Wherever You Are. Great Courses (Number 3092), 2013. East Lansing: Cultural Intelligence Center, 2013.

Teaching Cross-Culturally: An Incarnational Model for Learning and Teaching. Lingenfelter (PhD, University of Pittsburgh) is provost emeritus and senior professor of anthropology at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. Judith E. Lingenfelter, Sherwood G. Lingenfelter. Baker Books, 2003, Trade Paperback. Mayers (1927-2015; PhD, University of Chicago) founded the Cook School of Intercultural Studies at Biola University, where he taught for many years.

Ministering Cross-Culturally : An Incarnational Model for Personal .

Ministering Cross-Culturally : An Incarnational Model for Personal Relationships. by Marvin K. Mayers and Sherwood G. Ultimately, Lingenfelter and Mayers invite people to work toward being 150% persons, drawing on Malcolm McFee's observation about Native Americans (in particular, the Blackfoot) who were not quite completely Native Americans any longer, but rather about 75%, and that they had assimilated sufficiently into the dominant culture that they fit 75% in there, hence 150%. Lingenfelter and Mayers help their readers examine the variouscultural values people encounter as they interact with people fromother cultures.

In Ministering Cross-Culturally, the authors demonstrate that Jesus needed to learn and understand the culture . The authors examine how this can help us better understand what it means to establish relationships of grace with those from different cultural. and social backgrounds.

In Ministering Cross-Culturally, the authors demonstrate that Jesus needed to learn and understand the culture in which he lived before he could undertake his public ministry. The authors examine how this can help us better understand what it means to establish relationships of grace with those from different cultural and social backgrounds. With more than 70,000 copies of the first edition in print, this incarnational model of ministry has proven successful for many people. Several sections in this second edition have been rewritten, and the entire book has been updated to reflect development in the authors' thinking. Drawing from the authors' rich experience on the mission field, this book will benefit anyone who wants to be salt and light in a multicultural and multiethnic world.
Alsanadar
This book should be required reading for anyone planning on doing any kind of cross-cultural ministry, no matter where it happens or with which group of people. The author's experience as a cultural anthropologist provides many examples of how the various dimensions of cultural lenses we all have affect relationships. That these took place in a remote Pacific Island venue actually helps focus attention on the model promoted rather than the specifics of a certain culture--and that is very helpful, especially when one is trying to diagnose relational interactions between any two people.

There is a helpful diagnostic inventory at the center of this book that is helpful in discovering one's own cultural preferences (ways of looking at things.) The rest of the book is about the specific cultural lenses we use and how they can trip us up in relationships with people who are using another lens. For example, one lens is that of time-orientation vs event-orientation. If we see time as a finite resource that must be fully used, we can be put off by someone who marks time passage by events rather than clocks. If we are task-oriented, we can feel that those who are person-oriented are less committed or even lazy because they don't appear to get as many tasks accomplished. By discovering where I am on the continuum of each pair of lenses, it becomes possible to see beyond my own mental programming and begin to appreciate the value of other cultures.

Finally, the first chapter posits that we must become "incarnate" in the second culture in order to gain competency. For Lingenfelter, this means learning from those served as a child humbly learns and grows. While we will never become 100% fluent in the new culture, we will be much more effective in our service.
Fenrikree
Review This book invites you to examine yourself from the viewpoint of being an alien in a new culture. The subject of the books the tensioning conflicts people experience when they try to work with people from a different cultural and social backgrounds. While the intended audience of this book is for those doing Christian missionary work in foreign countries, the principles discussed can be universally applied by anyone assigned to work abroad. The authors Lingenfelter and Mayers use a model of basic values that explores and points to personal and cross cultural roots of tension in interpersonal relationships and helps the person master and resolve those tensions by gaining personal insight into their behavior. There are 48 statements that are used to develop a personal profile. Then elements of that profile are chartered. The rest of the book explores those profiles for someone doing business in a far east asian cultural context. The chapters follow a pattern. The chapter discusses the cultural tension regarding time. The contrasting views are highlighted, followed by how those tensions manifest themselves in a real world issue.Then a proposed biblical response to that situation is examined.Finally the cultural implications of that solution is dissected. I found this systematic approach helpful . I gained insights into my own behaviors that both encouraged and challenged me. This is a book I would recommend for anyone traveling abroad for either secular or religious work purposes
MilsoN
In a concise, yet not weak manner the author argues for a theologically strong point, which is that the incarnation of Jesus Christ is the model for doing missions. (If Christology-the study of Christ and who Jesus is-is not the strength of evangelicalism, then I don't know what is.) The author comes from the position of Christ's incarnation as a model for missionary work. This is a highly challenging concept because he grapples with the tough applications drawn from passages like Philippians 2 which call us to have the same humility as Christ. He concisely draws from his own experience on an island in Micronesia, and from a wide array of cross cultural examples to make point after point building in a clear and logical format to convince us that the best approach to cross cultural ministry is to do what Jesus did. Leave heavens culture and become a Jewish baby.

He says we should in a similar way leave our culture to embrace the culture we are reaching out to. So for a missionary to Taiwan from America, it means leaving Americanisms behind and embracing Asian culture as a baby would. The problem with this analogy that I'm still mulling over is precisely this: Jesus did not leave heavens culture to embrace our culture only. Yes he embraced our culture, but then He specifically called us to Heaven's kingdom (repent for the Kingdom of heaven is at hand). He came as one of us to call us to heavens culture. But missionaries who are called to leave their own country like America to Taiwan are not supposed to call Taiwan to American culture but to heavens culture. If his analogy was pushed in that direction the equivalent would be Americans saying change because America is here. Unfortunately we might actually be doing this in more instances than we realize. Anyhow, we are really supposed to be processing three cultures (not two). We have our old culture, heaven's culture and the culture of the people we are called to minister to. I didn't see him deal with this at all in his foundational premise for this book. the entire thought process was quite a distraction for me and I really wonder what the author thinks about this. So the analogies break down to a degree.

I also kept thinking that Romans 6 would preach well with some of the concepts he was laying out. I would like to see the principles of Romans 6 developed as another chapter in this book. I believe Romans 6 would strengthen the authors points quite powerfully.

Still this book is highly challenging. I think ya gotta read it! It's a great book. It made me think deeply and confronted selfishness in my soul. How many books actually do that?

If you prayerfully read it with an open heart you will probably be rocked to the core. Especially if you are in missions or going on a missions trip or focused on another culture for ministry within your community.

Interesting labels helped me remember his concepts. He takes the theological concept of the God-man (Jesus) and calls it 200% person. He then drives the point of a 150% person home...someone in two cultures 75% each. His ability to make a point stick in a few sentences or paragraphs is superior to most other authors I've read. Well done!

If you are a missionary or considering it as a career, you ought to spend the few dollars and get this book. I recommend you start a notebook on it as I have to take copious notes for future study and teaching. It's that good of a book. I found the criticism leveled at this book in one rather harsh review to be unwarranted.

One element I think ought to be explored more than this book does is how we are called to maintain a distinction between our native culture and the Kingdom of God's culture while embracing some elements of our target culture AND still calling them to personal abandonment of that culture to enter the Kingdom of God's culture. All of this while helping each culture 'culturalize' the gospel! That's a bit complicated, but isn't it what we are doing if we claim to bring the ancient truths of the faith in cultures around the world in a culturally relevant way?

For those who are into the Insider movement, this book lays an interesting track down that you might find very interesting. Although I'm not involved with your movement, I do appreciate the balanced approach you must continually wrestle with and this book may help you stay focused on Christ in that process. Although I may not be in agreement with all the elements of the Insider movement, the concepts in this book ought to help you no matter where you stand on those issues. It is rooted in a very strong Christological focus which is my favorite topic in all theology. Perhaps that's precisely why I love this book.

So I heartily recommend this book and am already asking other people I know to read it. I hope you do too.
Ministering Cross-Culturally: An Incarnational Model for Personal Relationships ebook
Author:
Marvin K. Mayers,Sherwood G. Lingenfelter
Category:
Churches & Church Leadership
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EPUB size:
1847 kb
FB2 size:
1767 kb
DJVU size:
1644 kb
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Publisher:
Baker Academic; 2 edition (October 1, 2003)
Pages:
128 pages
Rating:
4.2
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