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The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinist Caste System (CALVARY CHAPEL ON CALVINISM) (Volume 2) ebook

by Mr. George L Bryson


George worked with Calvary Chapel and Chuck Smith from1968.

George worked with Calvary Chapel and Chuck Smith from1968. George is also the author of a number of other books mostly of a practical and theological nature. I must admit upfront that as soon as I read the title, "The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinist Caste System," I had immediately began to worry that this book was going to simply be a full-blown attack on Calvinist thought, somewhat like what I got from "The Other Side of Calvinism" by Laurence Vance.

Published January 1st 2004 by Calvary Chapel. Bryson says that he is a biblical Monergist. However, everything I have read in this book so far leaves no doubt that Bryson would hold that God will not save anyone without that persons actions, . The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinistic Caste System. 1931667888 (ISBN13: 9781931667883).

The Dark Side of Calvinism-The Calvinist Caste System. amp; The Five Points of Calvinism-Weighed and Found Wanting. What a world of difference between Bryson's anti-Calvinist diatribe and Kuyper's Lectures on Calvinism. The latter soars, while the former sinks. I have just finished reading two books from non-Calvinists: Dave Hunt's What Love is This? and George Bryson's The Five Points of Calvinism. and stinks! The cover illustration claims that George Bryson found the doctrines of Calvinism "wanting".

Release Date: January 2004. Publisher: Calvary Chapel Publishing.

In the Dark Side of Calvinism you will discover that according to John Calvin. o. rranges all things by his sovereign counsel, in such a way that individuals are born, who are doomed from the womb to certain deat. f you disagree with this statement you must also disagree with John Calvin and Calvinism. Release Date: January 2004.

Published by Calvary Chapel Publishing (CCP) a resource ministry of Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa 3800 South Fairview Rd. Santa Ana, CA 92704.

Are you sure you want to remove The Dark Side of Calvinism from your list? There's no description for this book ye. January 2004, Calvary Chapel. Paperback in English.

January 2004, Calvary Chapel. Libraries near you: WorldCat. Created December 10, 2009. Download catalog record: RDF, JSON.

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Reading Length provides a calculation for the word count of this book, find out how long it will take you to read! . The average reader will spend 6 hours and 40 minutes reading The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinist Caste System (CALVARY CHAPEL ON CALVINISM) (Volume 2) at 250 WPM (words per minute). How quickly can you read this book? Enter your reading speed here: Estimate. To find your reading speed you can take one of our WPM tests. View The Potter's Promise: A Biblical Defense of Traditional Soteriology on Reading Length.

He answers this by looking at the necessary theological and logical conclusions that calvinism brings you too which upon very close inspection are contradictory and dark (i say that with love). The dark side of calvinism takes an exhaustive look into the philosophical and theological arguments of reformed thought.

Santa Ana, CA : Calvary Chapel Publishing, 2004. Bryson’s book is a mixture of these others. The logic of Calvinism-the good, the bad and the ugly – stands or falls together (pp. 49-53, 275)

Santa Ana, CA : Calvary Chapel Publishing, 2004. Like Vance, he has numerous quotes from Calvinistic authors. Like Olson, he includes exegetical arguments. Like Hunt, he employs logic to show the illogic of Calvinism. 49-53, 275). Since this is the nature of Calvinism (p. 51), Bryson does not feel compelled to deal with the five points of Calvinism as traditionally presented, namely, TULIP.

The Procession to Calvary is an oil-on-panel by the Netherlandish Renaissance artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder of Christ carrying the Cross set in a large landscape, painted in 1564. It is in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. This is the second-largest known painting by Bruegel. It is one of sixteen paintings by him which are listed in the inventory of the wealthy Antwerp collector, Niclaes Jonghelinck, drawn up in 1566.

In the Dark Side of Calvinism you will discover that according to John Calvin: … God … arranges all things by his sovereign counsel, in such a way that individuals are born, who are doomed from the womb to certain death … If you disagree with this statement you must also disagree with John Calvin and Calvinism. If you agree with this statement you must also disagree with our Lord who said: …God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life…Jn. 3:16
Froststalker
I must admit upfront that as soon as I read the title, "The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinist Caste System," I had immediately began to worry that this book was going to simply be a full-blown attack on Calvinist thought, somewhat like what I got from "The Other Side of Calvinism" by Laurence Vance. But as I began reading it, to see what he states since I am doing some research on the subject, I found out that Bryson has written a very informative and fair book on the issue, primarily, of the doctrine of reprobation and it being the "dark side" of Calvinism. Bryson states early on "Everyone seriously considering a theological move in the direction of Reformed Theology deserves to know about Calvinism's dark side before they make a commitment to Calvinism" (p. 22). This book goes into great lengths to highlight this problem in Calvinism.

What Bryson does best in this book, and also what can be seen as a liability, is he has an exhaustive conversation between Calvinists, quoting dozens of them throughout his long chapters (I believe he is more fair in this than Vance, for Vance seems to only deal with the negative material, while Bryson points out from time to time where a Calvinist got it right). I say that this can also be a liability because he is constantly belaboring point after point in order for the Calvinists to have this conversation. So it is a two edged sword: in one sense the reader should appreciate the vast resource of view points from Calvinist and Reformed writers that Bryson utilizes (which also comes out in his many citations: I first was surprised he simply kept the quotations going from 1 to 618, not separating them by chapter, which made me think he was doing that for the sake of showing off; but once I began reading the book, I found it very easy to go to the back and look up the quote because you didn't have to be lost in trying to first find the chapter--you just simply go to the quote); in the other sense, as you read you get a little frustrated that he says the same thing almost fifteen to twenty times in the chapter, which would have made the book an easier read if he were a little more concise; yet, it was understandable why he did it: he simply wanted to demonstrate that the view he was presenting was coming from the mouth of the Calvinists, not from his own opinion of them. So, though it made sense why he does belabor his points, it made it also a little redundant to read at times.

That being said, Bryson demonstrates a few important things in this book: one, he shows the problematic nature for some Calvinists to defend their position, especially when it comes to reprobation. These Calvinists he calls "Hypo-Calvinists," coming from the word, "hypo" meaning "less than normal," while another group of Calvinists he calls "Hyper-Calvinists" from the word "hyper" which means "more than normal" (see his explanation on pp. 55-56). The Hypo-Calvinists usually softens the "dark" views of Calvinism, or brushes over certain areas of it, even though he or she teaches the bright side of it without shame (the "predestination to salvation" part), while Hyper-Calvinists simply let the doctrine take them to the logical conclusions (that God foreordains both salvation and reprobation). Examples he uses of Hypo-Calvinists are Charles Spurgeon, R.C. Sproul, James White, John MacArthur, Jr., John Feinburg, John Piper, Jay Adams and others, while examples of Hyper-Calvinists are John Calvin, John Gill, Charles Hodge, Herman Hoeksema, Herman Hanko, Douglas Wilson, Edwin Palmer, and others. Bryson brilliantly goes from author to author in the Calvinist literature and shows the inconsistent defense made among them in trying to explain either the logical conclusion of Sovereign Election taught by Calvinism (in the form of double predestination) or in trying to explain non-Calvinist passages of Scripture (those passages which obviously contradict Calvinist assumptions).

The book is primarily laid out by one chapter presenting and explaining the Calvinist's position and another chapter to refute the particular position Biblically. Here, though, part of the redundancy comes out because it seems he carries over sometimes the same arguments from the "explanation" side to the "refuted" side as if he didn't feel he was finished explaining the things he over-explained in the previous chapters. But it is amazing to see how Calvinists attempt to explain away many obvious contradictions to their own position, debating back and forth on what the answer should be and showing that there is confusion in the particular thinking there. The Scriptures state that God is "not the author of confusion" (1 Cor. 14:33) and so such disconcertment in answering contradictions should bare red flags for any student of the Bible.

So, on the whole, this book is a valuable critique of Calvinism, more so than I was expecting. I like reasonable books which give critiques on Calvinism in fair and enlightening ways (such as "Why I am Not a Calvinist" by Walls and Dongell or "Arminian Theology" by Roger Olson), so I was skeptical of this book (I think he would do good to change the title a bit). But Bryson instead made a fair assessment of the dilemmas and utilized very clearly the Reformed, Calvinist position by his dialogue between their many authors.

One final critique, which is a small one, but I believe Bryson must remove: in chapter one he added a quote from the rabid false teacher Fred Phelps (pp. 52-53), because Phelps is also a Calvinist. The good thing is, he only mentioned him once, but I believe that he should simply remove this quote out of his book due to the fact that Phelps is a bad example of those who believe in Calvinism, which most are very fine and reasonable theologians. This quote really does nothing to add to the debate (it is another one to belabor the point) so it is worthless to down-grade this good work with the possible critique by Calvinists due to that one quote. I hope he takes heed to this when he updates this book.
Went Tyu
Bryson does an excellent job of laying out Calvinist doctrine (it can vary quite a bit) by actually quoting Calvinists themselves. From here he goes on to show where their thinking is flawed and illogical and how they misunderstand certain concepts in the Bible. This leads to a picture of God that is really an idol. He is very fair to point out that there is truth in Calvinism (isnt that how Satan ALWAYS does it???), but that the errors in this man made philosophy are quite large. Either Calvinism is true or it is not...either it is the proper way to understand the Scripture or it is not. It is not and Bryson has done us a great service with this book. Highly recommended.
Nten
Excelente!
SadLendy
Well written and easy to read. I have read two other books on calvinism and wondered if this would give the same information. This book does contain some info that the other two did not have.
Rocksmith
The Dark Side of Calvinism takes an exhaustive look into the philosophical and theological arguments of Reformed thought. I was skeptical when I first saw the book as I believed that the author may have simply been on a smear campaign, nevertheless upon reading it I found that not to be the case at all. In fact, the title is an excellent choice once you read the argument he is making. Essentially Bryson asks the question: is the Calvinistic depiction of God the same as what is revealed in Scripture (I'm paraphrasing of course). He answers this by looking at the necessary theological and logical conclusions that Calvinism brings you too which upon very close inspection are contradictory and dark (I say that with love). Many Calvinists have complained that George did "not use enough Scriptural exegesis" or that "he used too many analogies". I genuinely don't understand why they make that charge because he uses an abundant amount of Scripture. . Bryson looks at the overwhelming majority of Calvinist proof texts and then he examines them in the light of other scripture. He then offers a very logical and concise explanation of why the Calvinist interpretation is false, and then he demonstrates his point through the use of analogies. This is a very sophisticated teaching mechanism and it is really helpful in clarifying points and making logical connections. I believe the my reformed brothers who accuse him of not using enough Scriptural exegesis are referring to the fact that he didn't obsess over grammatical minutia. While grammar is certainly important, if one places too much weight on it, they can miss the context of the words and THAT is what determines the meaning. Not just its immediate context but also the entire context of Scripture. For instance one could take the grammatical construct of Mark 16:16 and Acts 2:38-41 and make a very logical argument that baptism is necessary for salvation. Though it would be logical indeed it would still be unscriptural. That type of thinking is essentially what has led to reformed thought. Its taking particular verses, ignoring the rest of scripture and uses those verses to prove particular points on limited atonement and predestination.... In all, this book is a must read if you are struggling with which camp to identify with. READ IT and judge for yourself.
The Dark Side of Calvinism: The Calvinist Caste System (CALVARY CHAPEL ON CALVINISM) (Volume 2) ebook
Author:
Mr. George L Bryson
Category:
Protestantism
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1942 kb
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Calvary Chapel Publishing (April 23, 2015)
Pages:
400 pages
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