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Mastering 3D Animation ebook

by Peter Ratner


Mastering 3D Animation book.

Mastering 3D Animation book. Details (if other): Cancel.

From basic to advanced information, this handbook covers it all: NURBS and polygon modeling/animating; deformation tools; modeling human figures and expressive facial animation; lighting, surfacing, composition, and special effects

From basic to advanced information, this handbook covers it all: NURBS and polygon modeling/animating; deformation tools; modeling human figures and expressive facial animation; lighting, surfacing, composition, and special effects. Exercises are provided in a tform-specific format to encourage readers to experiment with their own technology. A huge number of illustrations along with sample animations on a CD-ROM make this a book no aspiring animator, pro, or teacher should be without.

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My compliments to Peter Ratner for conveying many complicated techniques in an understandable way.  .

Peter Ratner is the founder and head of the computer animation program at James Madison University and the author of 3-D Human Modeling and Animation.

3-D Human Modeling and Animation fills a tremendous void that has become even more evident with the successful use of 3-D in movies like Disney's Toy Story. While there has been much written about drawing the human form in relation to art, commercial design, and 2-D cartooning, the subject of 3-D modeling and animation of the human form has been neglected at the same time that the use of 3-D tools has been exploding.

3-d human modeling and animation Ratner, Peter Wiley 9780470396674 Петер Ратнер: 3D-модели и анимация человека : Completely updated . 3-d human modeling and animation, Ratner, Peter. Варианты приобретения.

3-d human modeling and animation Ratner, Peter Wiley 9780470396674 Петер Ратнер: 3D-модели и анимация человека : Completely updated-the head-to-toe guide to creating animated human characters .

John Wiley & Sons, 27 abr. 2012 - 400 páginas. 3-D Human Modeling and Animation. All the tools and techniques you need to bring human figures to 3-D life. After a brief overview of human anatomy, you'll delve into the basic principles of proportion and structure, along with the different body parts. Exploring human modeling, texturing, rigging, and lighting leads you to more advanced techniques for digital figure animation.

Mastering 3D Animation. Allworth Press, Skyhorse Publishing.

Riveting illustrations and step-by-step instructions show animators at .all levels how to create professional, studio-quality 3D models and animations in this easy-to-follow guide that includes a CD-ROM. From basic to advanced information, this handbook covers it all: NURBS and polygon modeling/animating; deformation tools; modeling human figures and expressive facial animation; lighting, surfacing, composition, and special effects. Exercises are provided in a non-software/non-platform-specific format to encourage readers to experiment with their own technology. A huge number of illustrations along with sample animations on a CD-ROM make this a book no aspiring animator, pro, or teacher should be without.
Siralune
Peter J. Ratner's second authoring effort, Mastering 3D Animation, is a 333-page softcover text that is a comprehensive, detailed and practical tutorial guide addressing nearly every aspect and segment of the 3D graphics genre. The book's 14 chapters-and accompanying follow-along CD for PC and Mac-speak to modeling (beginning and advanced), animation, special effects, lighting, surfacing techniques, facial animation, elements of action, figure movements and composition and cinematography. It's an exceptionally capable complement to Ratner's first book, 3-D Human Modeling and Animation. (Ratner currently is updating the latter text with a wholesale rewrite.)
Make no mistake: This is no cursory guide to constructing simple geometry, slapping on some stock textures, animating basic movements along spline paths and rendering to AVI while you're sipping on a latte, watching the Discovery Channel. A full-time professor in the 3D Computer Animation department of James Madison University and the program's founder, Ratner relies on the broad and substantial digital and conventional art experience that has rewarded him with artistic entries in more than 80 national and international juried exhibitions. Ratner is well-versed in most aspects of 3D art creation, choreography and cinematography. The results of his industry experience are a splendid collection of detailed and refined insights and experiences assimilated into a thorough tutorial guide. I have no doubt-as many experts agree-that Mastering 3D Animation is equipped to serve as a collegiate-level textbook for 3D computer animation curricula.
Spanning the many processes related to generating 3D digital art, Ratner illustrates his critical techniques with 658 black-and-white line drawings and grayscale screen captures. The images vary from basic and sketchy but illustrative black-only perspectives, steps and graphs to grayscale representations depicting character renderings, particle systems, height fields, geometric displacements, facial close-ups, rendered environments and more. Of particular interest to those having cinematography or traditional art backgrounds are the commentary, instructions and grayscale reproductions of painted and sketched art dating back multiple centuries.
Those attending to a more technical emphasis and interest are accommodated in every respect, however-minus superficial references to hardware specifications. Early on, Ratner clarifies his intentions in composing this text: "[The book's] purpose is not to create button pushers who can boast about megahertz, abundant RAM, big monitors and software with all kinds of bells and whistles. It is hoped that aspiring 3D artists will learn some valuable lessons from the great art geniuses that have preceded them." (Foreward/vii) Yes, Ratner does wane philosophical, at times, but his contemplative tendencies bring a refreshing and purist perspective to a field frequently inundated by overly technical meanderings and functionally pointless rambling. Thus, Ratner blends an in-depth artistic and technical knowledge with a practicality and philosophy altogether forming a well-rounded perspective-one catering to persons of various inclinations and backgrounds.
The companion CD contains 200-plus 3D models in a variety of formats: LightWave 3D's .lwo and .lws; Wavefront's .obj; Maya's .ml and the generic .dxf. Tutorial project files are archived in QuickTime (.mov) and JPEG (.jpg) formats, and Ratner also includes a Photoshop brush file (.abr) for creating "grime" textures.
As for the text's informational composition, chapters one and two explore the basics of 3D modeling-polygonal and spline-based (NURBS). Chapter 3 addresses basic 3D animation, while the fourth delves further into animation by considering the role of deformation tools: skeletons ("bones"); kinematics; lattice flexors, etc. In Chapter 5, Ratner explains special effects, including the use of spheres, particles, collision detection, voxels, fragments, displacement mapping and more. Part II of the text, Advanced 3D Modeling, begins with commentary about the human head's structure and composition, including muscles and bone. Ratner explains both the NURBS- and polygon- based methods for modeling the head. Special attention is allotted to features, such as the eyes, eyelids, eye sockets and ears. There's no lack of detail, here, and NURBS fans will experience a rare sensation-a feeling of belongingness.
The next two chapters, six and seven, are devoted to modeling the human figure. The latter stresses finishing-hair, eyelashes and clothing. Chapters 9 and 10 comprise Part III: Preparing for Animation. Lighting is the focus of Chapter 9, and Chapter 10-another that may appeal particularly to conventional artists-deals with surfacing techniques. The author goes beyond the typical texture map types-cylindrical, planar, spherical, cubic, etc.-and the use of photos to address alternative surfacing methods, such as transparency (alpha) and displacement maps. In short, Ratner extends well beyond the conventional surfacing methods most highly publicized, deeply exploring what might be categorized more aptly as upper-echelon trade tips than as common genre knowledge: creating sophisticated bump maps; using grayscale gradients in displacement; and more.
Part IV of the book, Character Animation Fundamentals, includes chapters 11-14: Expressing Emotion with Facial Animation (11); The Elements of Action (12); Movements of the Figure (13); Composition and Cinematography (14). Once again, the author uses an expansive knowledge of choreography and anatomy to help quantify how human emotions are exhibited: body posturing; eye wideness; lip contour; eyebrow position; even directional muscular pull. Each of these considerations can be projected in a 3D figure, and Ratner shows the reader how. "A muscle is composed of a bundle of fibers that work in mutual association to perform common duties," Ratner writes on Page 248. "... It is this combination of movements that results in the complicated harmony of the facial muscles."
The Elements of Action chapter confronts those issues pertinent to a convincing human portrayal by a mere collection of polygons or surfaced curved lines: timing; sound syncing; weight and recoil ("squash and stretch"); walk cycles and more. Chapter 13 addresses concerns complementary to those in the previous one, including body mass motion, pace and impact, equilibrium, action lines, rhythm and still more. The final score of this harmonized tutorial prose pursues line composition, spatial arrangement, blocking (proxy geometry) and all manner of photographic issues and techniques. The reader will learn practical cinematography terminology-camera techniques and movements, transitions, more-and the fundamental tenets of motion depiction utilized by artists centuries earlier.
Akir
Although a nice book that goes into depth in areas that other modeling books haven't, the generalized, not-to-mention-one-specific-application approach the author has taken left me, a beginner, bewildered and drooling. Also, I think some of what isn't explained in detail was not explained purposely as it was difficult to put into words and considered common sense, which seems to be the case with several tutorials and books that I've read on modeling. I want to know things like: Once I have my splines slapped down in a front perspective, how do I push and pull them properly from other perspectives so they'll take shape, or When defining detail with polygons, how many should I tesselate, how can I manipulate them to look like a gradual bump for a muscle and not a sharp cornered cliff? To sum it up, the book was written for the more experienced and those who are very well aquainted with their software packages-I was expecting step-by-step modeling for newbies.
Feri
I thoroughly enjoyed this book, from its technical standpoint of working between the program and the supporting 3D theory/thought process that Mr. Ratner provides.
Finding that balance of an artist and technologist from where to launch one's vision and future visions of creativity starts with good knowledge. Ratner gives many facets of where to see this vision and tutorials to follow through with your own creative projects.
I commonly work with many high-end graphics programs, Lightwave 7.0 being my newest program on my plate. Peter Ratner's 3d book getting me from a begining user from just reading the index to a 3D artist ready to start the new facets of my own portfolio. Mastering 3D Animation helped quite a bit everything from the Modeling and subdivides to the theory/progress.
Joseph Arthur
Information Architects, Principal
Zicelik
Mastering 3D Animation" gives a good overview of the common modeling and animation techniques used to create realistic characters in a lifelike virtual environment. This book doesn't restrict to solutions of one specific commercial software but presents basic concepts which may be adapted for your own applications. It represents a great learning tool in and out of the classroom. In the beginning lessons seamless NURBS and polygons characters are constructed step-by-step including inverse kinematics and facial animation. Principles and techniques of 3D character animation are also discussed in depth. The special effects, lighting and surfacing chapters are really great. Peter Ratner's second book is a worthy successor of his first one.
Mike Cobo, Graduate Student, University of Bern, Switzerland
Olma
I liked reading through "Mastering 3D Animation" very much. In the first few sections the author Peter Ratner describes the basic need to know stuff of 3D computer graphics in an easy to understand way. Even though I knew most of it already I found parts of it quite interesting. Starting with the section about special effects it becomes helpful even for advanced users. I especially liked the advanced modeling and character modeling part. There are examples and howtos on modeling, animating, shading and lightning for the reader to explore. As an autodidact I buy nearly every 3d book I can lay my hands on and my collection has grown noticeably. This book is definitely one of the better ones!
Jörg Flügge, Munich, Germany 02/25/2001
Mastering 3D Animation ebook
Author:
Peter Ratner
Category:
Movies
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1578 kb
FB2 size:
1389 kb
DJVU size:
1250 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Allworth Press; 2nd edition (April 1, 2004)
Pages:
368 pages
Rating:
4.1
Other formats:
lit mobi lit rtf
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