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The Gates of Twilight (Bantam Spectra Book) ebook

by Paula Volsky


Series: Bantam Spectra Book. Paperback: 352 pages. Publisher: Spectra (February 1, 1996). In The Gates of Twilight, the eastern country of Aveshq has been occupied by the western civilization of Vonahr for two centuries

Series: Bantam Spectra Book. In The Gates of Twilight, the eastern country of Aveshq has been occupied by the western civilization of Vonahr for two centuries. The situation has been uneasy for some time, but now the native population seems poised on the violence. The Vonahrish Residency suspects the ancient secretive Aveshquian cult called the VaiPradh is working behind the scenes to incite the Aveshquian people to rebellion.

Paula Volsky is an American fantasy author. Bantam Spectra, 1993. The Gates of Twilight. Bantam Spectra, 1996. After releasing novels regularly for nearly twenty years, Volsky published no new work for nearly a decade, even though Locus had reported her sale of a "new fantasy trilogy" to Bantam Books in mid-2000  . Bantam Spectra, 1997. Bantam Spectra, 2000.

Published 12 years, 5 months ago. View all The Gates of Twilight (Bantam Spectra Book) lists. Manufacturer: Bantam USA Release date: 1 August 1996 ISBN-10 : 0553373943 ISBN-13: 9780553373943. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The Gates of Twilight book. Published January 1st 1997 by Bantam USA (first published 1996). 0553572695 (ISBN13: 9780553572698).

Bantam Spectra is the science fiction division of American publishing company Bantam Books, which is owned by Random House. Spectra authors have collectively won 31 such awards in the fields of science fiction and fantasy, and been nominated on 132 occasions.

Publisher: Spectra/Bantam. More Science Fiction & Fantasy . More by paula volsky.

The gates of twilight. New York : Bantam Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on July 21, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014). After a long delay, the publisher announced that the final volume had been completed, and that it would issue the books beginning in late 2011. This series is being released under the pseudonym Paula Brandon, with the first book,

Paula Volsky, author of The White Tribunal, returns with a spectacular saga of adventure and intrigue, romance and rebellion - beginning with a wondrous discovery that could forever alter the fate of the free world. In the modern, civilized republic of Vonahr, the need for magic seems a thing of the past.

Also from bantam spectra. The Father of the Bride first appeared in Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, May 1982

Also from bantam spectra. A mind’s-eye view into the fast and hard-edged world of future technology. A Bantam Spectra Book/published by arrangement with Bluejay Books, Inc. PUBLISHING HISTORY. The Father of the Bride first appeared in Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone Magazine, May 1982. A Letter from the Clearys first appeared in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, July 1982. And Come from Miles Around first appeared in Galileo magazine, Sept.

In a fragile alliance, the natives are stirring uneasily under their foreign rulers. Rebellion is brewing, and at the heart of the conflict lies the bloody and powerful cult of the god Aoun, whose followers will stop at nothing to rid their land of alien domination. So civil servant Renille vo Chaumelle, scion of a proud, conquering line mingled with native blood, is conscripted as a spy and ordered to penetrate the fortress-temple known as the Fastness of the Gods. There he is to discover the secrets of the priests of Aoun and - if the chance presents itself - assassinate the lead priest, named in legend as the god's own son. But in the holiest depths of the temple, Renille finds there is more to the cult than his superiors suspect - far more than they will ever believe. What he learns leads him to the beautiful princess Jathondi, daughter of the native ruler, who is fated to be the crux of a violent confrontation between the fanatic followers of a flesh-hungry god and their arrogant overlords. Together, Jathondi and Renille must brave a whirlwind of revolution and apocalyptic magic that could shatter a nation, and open the long-sealed portal between heaven and earth.
Dorizius
Ever get weary of all the practically interchangeable fantasy novels that all seem to be populated with the same characters in the same setting having the exact same quest-like adventure? I do sometimes. Fantasy as a genre encompasses almost infinite possibilities that many novelists take little advantage of.
That's why I was thrilled to find Paula Volsky. Her novels are often inspired by real world events or classic literature that have been mixed with sorcery and magic. Her stories are populated with unusual characters caught up in formidable conflict in beautifully drawn and detailed worlds. Also each of her novels are unique, and take the reader to totally different places. The Gates of Twilight is no exception.

In The Gates of Twilight, the eastern country of Aveshq has been occupied by the western civilization of Vonahr for two centuries. The situation has been uneasy for some time, but now the native population seems poised on the violence. The Vonahrish Residency suspects the ancient secretive Aveshquian cult called the VaiPradh is working behind the scenes to incite the Aveshquian people to rebellion. So they decide to send Renuille vo Chaumelle, a civil servant with mixed blood and a deep understanding of the Aveshquian people, as a spy. Renuille penetrates the cult's fortress/temple JiPhaindru and discovers secrets more horrifying and dangerous than he could possibly have imagined...

Paula Volsky has a very unique writing style that's more sophisticated and formal than you would normally find in fantasy. Occasionally the prose comes across as a wee bit stiff and forced, but most of the time the writing is elegant, especially during dialogue.

Volsky's novels often have grotesque elements such as instances of horror torture or violence, so I don't recommend them for readers who want to avoid the macabre in their fantasy. However The Gates of Twilight has less. There is one bloody and rather gruesome cult ritual but that's the most explicit scene in the book.

I'm always pleased to find fantasy that steps beyond familiar archetypes, Tolkien plot rip-offs and typical pseudo-medieval settings. And that's exactly what Volsky delivers in The Gates of Twilight.
Hanad
We return to the world of Illusion--old stomping ground--with Ms. Volsky's The Gates of Twilight; the time is a few generations after that wonderful novel (she does satisfy our curiosity about Dref and Eliste in a few placating sentences), the place a colony of post-revolutionary Vonahr. The setting is familiar to those who know about the English settlements in the Indies (any passing knowledge of the Jungle Book suffices) and the plot unsurprisingly touches on the injustices of imperialism thereof. The storyline is complete, unlike The Wolf of Winter, but feels sketchy in parts, unlike Illusion. Secondary characters, which in her previous works would have resurfaced somewhere within the novel to lend a sense of completeness and continuity, are dropped after a few limp scenes. Ms. Volsky also begins to develop her "planar" concept of God, which was hinted at with The Wolf of Winter's necromancy, and is more fully developed in The White Tribunal. On the whole, The Gates of Twilight is readable, enjoyable for an afternoon, but not a true indication of Ms. Volsky's talent.--Emily C. A. Snyder
Anaragelv
this book takes you to fictional, Vonahrish colonized Kahnderule (akin to India/S. Asia), where a decidedly alien (though now degenerated) 'god' is still lurking about. it's a beautifully detailed and colorful fantasy setting.

Perhaps to match her setting and her characters --the two leads being entre-deux-- her style of prose remains the same, but the way she constructs the story/characters/meaning has a different flavor... more subtle, and more abstract. I'd guess that she was experimentating a little. I think it's an excellent book, but if you're looking for another Eliste VoDerrival, she's not here.

(Note to Amazon; I used some of the same phrasing that i used for a review elsewhere).
Nto
If you've read "Illusion" you know what I mean. The book is good, I like the settings of 18th century India at the time of the British settlement that were used as inspiration of the story, but the characters were too bidimensional. You never quite got to know them deep inside, its as if they're just actors playing a role, very unlike "Illusion" were you could feel the passion and see the souls of the characters. And the secondary characters were used as fillers, just to make it look complex. But even so, it's not boring, it's as deep a reading as the previous books and its quite entertaining, but it didn't leave me thinking like Illusion did at the end, which by the way was pretty easy to find out. But these are only my opinions, and I encourage people to find out by themselves, as I did with Illusion, which is still my favorite. This one might turn out to be yours.
Ginaun
First off, I have to say that Paula Volsky is one of my favourite authors. I absolutely loved "The Grand Ellipse," and I enjoyed "The White Tribunal."
After shelling out $20 at the local B&N for the trade paperback, though, I feel a little cheated. The story is interesting, and Volsky's graceful, descriptive style makes "The Gates of Twilight" a good enough read. However, there is absolutely no character development (that I can see, anyway). I found it hard to really like the main characters, or care what happened to them. The two main characters never really grow as people, and the romance just kind of popped up--it feels like it was there only because it was expected of Volsky.
That being said, I suggest for those set on buying this novel to get the mass-market paperback...or if you just want to read it, pick it up in the library. It's good, but I prefer "The Grand Ellipse."
The Gates of Twilight (Bantam Spectra Book) ebook
Author:
Paula Volsky
Category:
Fantasy
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1211 kb
FB2 size:
1717 kb
DJVU size:
1647 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Spectra (February 1, 1996)
Pages:
352 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
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