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Call to Arms (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine / The Dominion War Book 2) (v. 2) ebook

by Diane Carey


Bring us around for another pass.

Bring us around for another pass. the United Federation of Planets. Soon the station would be Terok Nor once again, and there would be Cardassians running the powerful weapons, turning those arrays on Federation ships.

Diane Carey is primarily a science fiction author best known for her work in the Star Trek franchise

I'm not really familiar with Deep Space Nine, so, a lot of this book was lost on me. Still, the writing was good, and the story felt exciting. Diane Carey is primarily a science fiction author best known for her work in the Star Trek franchise. She has been the lead-off writer for two Star Trek spin-off book series: Star Trek The Next Generation with Star Trek: Ghost Ship, and the novelization of the Star Trek: Enterprise pilot, Broken Bow.

Call to Arms" is the 26th and final episode of the fifth season of the science fiction television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, the 124th episode overall. Many recurring characters make appearances including Garak, Weyoun, Dukat, Martok, Leeta, and Ziyal.

The Dominion War Book 2 (Star Trek Deep Space Nine). Download (lit, 174 Kb). Epub FB2 PDF mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

List of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels based on the American science fiction television series of the same name. The book line was published by Simon & Schuster imprints Pocket Books, Pocket Star, Gallery, and Atria

List of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels based on the American science fiction television series of the same name. The book line was published by Simon & Schuster imprints Pocket Books, Pocket Star, Gallery, and Atria.

The Dominion was a major interstellar state in the Gamma Quadrant . DS9: "Call to Arms", "A Time to Stand") However, it was dealt a major setback in mid-2374, when Starfleet and Klingon forces retook Deep Space 9 and prevented the Dominion from obtaining reinforcements from the Gamma Quadrant. DS9: "Sacrifice of Angels") Also in that year, the Romulan Star Empire joined the war against the Dominion. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, p. 73) Ira Steven Behr once referred to the Dominion as "an attempt by the staff to come up with something specific about the Gamma quadrant.

Call To Arms serves as a payoff to the season-long buildup to the Dominion War, and it does not disappoint, giving us some rousing action, some moving emotional beats, and concluding with a dramatic, and, from my perspective at least, completely unexpected shift in the series’ status quo. It’s the sort of sudden shock that made me fall in love with Battlestar Galactica: forcing characters into different roles, different context, and tearing apart the show at its very foundations, until we’re forced to question what brings us here in the first place

The Dominion War: Book - 1st printing. Written by Diane Carey. Softcover, 4 in. x 7 i. 267 pages, text only. Tags: Star Trek Crossover Dominion War (part 2), Star Trek. Published Nov 1998 by Pocket Books.

The Dominion War: Book - 1st printing.

If you haven't played Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Dominion Wars or want to try this strategy video game .

If you haven't played Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Dominion Wars or want to try this strategy video game, download it now for free! Published in 2001 by Simon & Schuster Interactive, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Dominion Wars (aka Star Trek: Тень Доминиона, Star Trek: Ten' Dominiona) was an above-average sci-fi, futuristic title in its time. Published in 2001 by Simon & Schuster Interactive, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Dominion Wars (aka Star Trek: Тень Доминиона, Star Trek: Ten' Dominiona) was an above-average sci-fi, futuristic title in its time. Captures and Snapshots.

Captain Sisko and the Deep Space Nine team must find a way to close down the wormhole to the Gamma Quadrant before the entire Federation is enslaved by the Dominion. Original.
Yayrel
This was a strange series of 4 books. 2 of them are from the TNG (Picard and crew) perspective that has an original storyline about the Dominion building an artificail wormhole in Cardy space to circumvent the Bajor wormhole that is mined. The even numbered books are just two of the DS9 TV episodes put into book format that semi-support the other two books.
Ber
This book, to me, tells the behind the scenes story from Deep Space Nine and the Dominion Wars. Because I watched the show it's easy to picture faces and scenarios. I liked it.
Hadadel
It was a very quick read. Nothing particularly new. The new stuff wasn't really worth it either. Gave it three.
Xinetan
This is my favorite of the is series. Not only do we see a very personal view of lif under occupation on the station but if you were unlucky enough to be made a slave. It helped explain the huge loss of life and the different view of life of the survivor's in the post war world. The Federation survived but not really. Not as it had been. I love the four book series but especially this one as much of it is about things not seen in the show. It also sharpens the deep fears that the Federation was going to still lose and life as they knew it wold be over for the survivors.
Celace
Call to Arms is the first of two books novelizing the six-episode "Dominion War" story-arc of Deep Space Nine. These six shows were among the best of the series; some of the highest quality television footage ever produced. And they squandered it all in the novelizations. Whereas usually they stretch 1 2-hour show to fill 250 or so pages of text, here they've condensed 6 hours of shows in two 250 page books. It's not a welcome change. Some of the scenes are shown from the same point of view as the show, some from different points of view, but there is very little new materiel, and much of what there is simply isn't enough.
The whole premise of the story is that the Federation is fighting a war against the Dominion, and losing. This is drilled into us, time and again, throughout the book. And yet we never really see this losing. Just about every battle or conflict that is shown here is won, and even when the station is evacuated, it's not really a horrible defeat -- the evac is done on Sisko's own terms. This shouldn't really seem so bad, except it's jarring because that's the whole point of the book, it seems. This book is so proud of itself, filled with little cliches and epiphanies about the nature of war, the devastation, the horror, and yet we see nothing of that except the talk.
However, the book still would have been salvageable if it had had some decent writing, editing, and length. The word Jem'Hadar is not spelled correctly *once* in the entire novel, and even such basic Star Trek words as Cochrane are misspelled. Often sentences are grammatically unsound, and it's unsettling to be jarred out of a battle scene by a sentence that just doesn't make any sense. And worst of all, none of the scenes are written memorably.
And the adaptation isn't that great. Presumably in an effort to save space, there were occasional whole passages that were nothing but dialogue -- no description or anything. While that can be very effective if done right, here it was just annoying. In addition, there were many battle scenes and crash scenes that weren't included in the shows for budget reasons -- and yet for some reason they didn't appear here, either, although the book could have been much more dramatic and fulfilling if they had, rather than just showing us "before the crash" and "after the crash" scenes.
There were a couple of high points here -- Worf's relationship with Alexander and Martok was much more effective here than on the show, and also we got a good look at Jem'Hadar thought processes and motivations here.
Unfortunately, overall this book just wasn't very good and isn't worth getting. Not enough effort, it seems, was put into it to be able to really take anything out of it.
Lightwind
I recently read through Dominion War 2 and 4. As I write this, it is 9/1/01, so I've had plenty of time for the episodes to churn through my head... I couldn't believe much of what I was reading. I remember enjoying most of the Diane Carey books I've read, including her novelizations, but this one was, shall we say, less than enjoyable. The necessary condensation of the episodes is frustrating at times, many of the best scenes being removed, but I expected that with 6 1/2 hours of TV being adapted into a little over 500 pages. But much of the writing makes me wonder if Diane Carey really watched the show. The characters just don't sync up with what we see on-screen. Here Sisko is not the same captain who read the names of every casualty in the war. He his cold, caring only about his immediate goals and ignoring the deaths of hundreds or thousands. (Admittedly, much of the relevant on-screen character development came AFTER the novel was written.) The "Tex" character (a less-than-subtle allusion to Chuck Norris) seems completely out of place, and serves as a ridiculous deus ex machina to allow O'Brien to escape the Jem'Hadar. But not before he outruns a dozen Jem'Hadar shooting at him... on foot... with an injured knee. In both of these novels (and "What You Leave Behind") the Jem'Hadar are treated as slow and stupid, and Carey repeatedly insists that they were bred for space combat, and clumsy on land. This attitude also makes the complex characters in "Rocks and Shoals" seem out of place.In the end, I often found myslef wondering if the author was confusing the Jem'Hadar and the Borg. (Why *does* she incessantly refer to the Jem'Hadar as white? She did the same thing in her novelization of WYLB.) Also the scale of the war frequently seems diminished from what we encounter on the show. Even the novel covers are symptomatic of this, showing only two ships on each cover. Don't get me wrong: The novel isn't horrifyingly bad. Despite my many qualms, I got through it rather painlessly. But it was a strain to see so much inconsistency. Spelling and logical mistakes abound as well. The Jem'Hadar are mispelled EVERY SINGLE TIME in book 2. NOVEL-ONLY SPOILER: The Centaur is chased by three Jem'Hadar ships: One breaks off, one is destroyed (by throwing a rope at it, no less [in a way that admittedly SOUNDS good, but when broken down, just wouldn't work]), and the Centaur gets home safe. WHAT HAPPENED TO THE OTHER SHIP??? Please, save yourself an exercise in frustration and just find something else to read.
Call to Arms (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine / The Dominion War Book 2) (v. 2) ebook
Author:
Diane Carey
Category:
Science Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1580 kb
FB2 size:
1392 kb
DJVU size:
1723 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Star Trek; Novelization edition (October 1, 1998)
Rating:
4.4
Other formats:
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