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Lankhmar Book 7: The Knight and Knave of Swords ebook

by Fritz Leiber


The Knight and Knave of Swords (1988).

The Knight and Knave of Swords (1988).

Автор: Leiber Fritz Название: Lankhmar, Book Seven: The Knight and .

Описание: Witty, gripping and urbane, Fritz Leiber& Lankhmar books are among the best loved of all modern fantasies.

Knave of Swords (Lankhmar Book 7) Fritz Leiber ww. fgateway Fritz Leiber. These books show that genuinely innovative SF is as exciting today as when it was first written

The Knight and Knave of Swords (Lankhmar Book 7) Fritz Leiber ww. fgateway. Enter the SF Gatewa. n the last years of the twentieth century (as Wells might have put it), Gollancz, Britain’s oldest and most distinguished science fiction imprint, created the SF and Fantasy Masterworks series. These books show that genuinely innovative SF is as exciting today as when it was first written. Now, as we move inexorably into the twenty-first century, we are delighted to be widening our remit even more.

This book is one of reminiscences with some eroticism and BDSM thrown in. In a way is seems like either Leiber was . In a way is seems like either Leiber was saying here's the kind of writing I wanted to do all along or OK, Publisher here is your punishment for making me write another of these damn books. Definitely not up to the standard of the previous works in this series. Neil Gaiman says something similar in his introduction to The Knight and Knave of Swords and I’m sure that most of Leiber’s fans feel the same way. I know I can re-read these stories at any time, but it’s just not the same thing. It’s sad to know that Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser’s adventures are over.

The Knight and Knave of Swords by Fritz Leiber . . SWORDS AGAINST WIZARDY THE SWORDS OF LANKHMAR SWORDS AND ICE MAGIC THE KNIGHT AND KNAVE OF SWORDS THE WANDERER - I: Sea Magic .1. On the world of Nehwon and the land of Simorgya, six days fast sailing south from Rime Isle, two handsome silvery personages conversed intimately yet tensely in a dimly and irregularly lit.

A somewhat unfair assessment of the last FatGM book by Fritz Leiber .

Neil Gaiman says something similar in his introduction to The Knight and Knave of Swords and I’m sure that most of Leiber’s fans feel the same way. I know I can re-read these stories at any time, but it’s j The Knight and Knave of Swords is the last collection of Fritz Leiber’s LANKHMAR stories about those two loveable rogues, Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser.

The final book in the seminal sword and sorcery series featuring Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser from the Grand Master of Science Fiction and Fantasy. The highly regarded British horror author Ramsey Campbell called Fritz Leiber the greatest living writer of supernatural horror fiction. Drawing many of his own themes from the works of Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, and H. P. Lovecraft, master manipulator Fritz Leiber is a worldwide legend within the fantasy genre, actually having coined the term sword and sorcery that would describe the subgenre he would more than help create.

He had firmly affixed a tapering, thin, finger-long iron rod (much like a sword blade's tang) to the midst of his bow and wedged it into the corresponding deep hole in the wooden wrist heading the closefitting leather stall.

He had firmly affixed a tapering, thin, finger-long iron rod (much like a sword blade's tang) to the midst of his bow and wedged it into the corresponding deep hole in the wooden wrist heading the closefitting leather stall, half the length of his forearm and dotted with holes for ventilation, that covered his newly healed stump - with the result that.

Author: Fritz Leiber.

The Knight and Knave of Swords. Author: Fritz Leiber. The Knight and Knave of Swords is a fantasy short story collection by Fritz Leiber featuring his sword and sorcery heroes Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. The Fafhrd and Gray Mouser stories follow the lives of two larcenous but likable rogues as they adventure across the fantasy world of Nehwon.

Dark Horse's republication of Fritz Leiber's immortal tales of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser reach a turning point with this new edition of Leiber's final stories of the two intrepid adventurers. Their journeys have taken them from one side of Nehwon to the other, facing life-risking peril at every turn. Now, in a set of stories that show us Fafhrd and the Mouser both on their own and together, they will face some of their most challenging obstacles, and - against assassins, angry gods, and even Death himself - the duo must battle for their very lives. With a mixture of high adventure, moving drama, and broad comedy, The Knight and Knave of Swords is a perfect endpiece to Leiber's stories of the stalwart comrades, and sets the stage for all-new adventures in the next volume, by renowned fantasy author Robin Wayne Bailey.
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In this seventh book of the series, those intrepid heroes and adventurers, Fafhrd and his partner, the Gray Mouser at first appear to have matured and grown settled in their new domestic ways. Even their men (reformed berserks and thieves) have settled in around them to enjoy the few simple delights that life in a fabled Northern seaport far removed from the flesh pots of Lankhmar have to offer. The heroes have repaired their ship and maintained their weapons, but a severe lack of adventure seems to be their lot. The heroes' new ladies seem very understanding--in fact, perhaps too much so. Our heroes are lulled into a sense of serenity which may actually contribute to their initial gullibility and failure to recognize danger when they it tempts them. Into their tranquil existence comes evil in the form of two old foes sworn to avenge themselves against our two heroes for past transgressions against them. The book is broken into three distinct episodes. In the first vignette, Fafhrd is almost seduced by an alluring but strange seeming woman, and in the next vignette, the Gray Mouser is equally muddled by another mysterious female. In these first two adventures, the heroes experience relatively solitary adventures. While each refers to his friend, they don't physically interact with each other during each adventure. Each must resolve his own trial without any help from his partner. The third (and longer)adventure reunites them. It ruptures the peace of the two heroes and their friends existence, and forces the Mouser to visit some long-forgotten foes and friends at a cost too dear to pay. In this adventure, each hero learns, or supposes facts about the others fate that at first seem trivial, but later turn out to be crucial for the continued existence of their partner. Each saves the other from a terrible fate. It all works out perfectly at the end thanks to the undimmed creative talents of Fritz Leiber, who has not lost his deft hand at resolving seemingly impossible situations with a satisfying coincidental conclusion to the tale. He ties together seemingly unrelated events into a satisfying whole. Even though this is the final chapter in Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser's careers as penned by the late master himself, Leiber's skills have not dimmed in the slightest. The reader is left happily looking forward to further adventures with these two heroes. Leiber surprises each of them with a son and a daughter whom they had not suspected they had sired, and who will presumably carry on the torch for them if they ever drop it. It leaves the reader happily expecting more adventures to come. This is a well done and satisfying end to the long and lucky careers of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. Any reader who has enjoyed the six previous collections of stories will be happy, and any new readers will not be too confused or disappointed by any obscure references or long expositions. This book should be read and enjoyed by everyone who admires well-written sword and sorcery adventures. I recommend it.
Blueshaper
After thoroughly enjoying the first five books of the series and finding the sixth book fairly interesting, I was deeply disappointed with the seventh book of the series. I got the impression that old Fritz had run out of new ideas and so had to resort to references to past chracters to flush out the story line. Fritz also threw in many more sex references, which to me seemed out of place and a limp substitute for a more creative story line.

I have reread the first five books of the series a number of times over the years and always enjoy them. I don't think I'll bother to read book seven again -- it was tiresome enough the first time. Sad to see the last Fafhrd and Mouser book written by Fritz Leiber end on a low note.
Ranicengi
Originally posted at Fantasy Literature.

The Knight and Knave of Swords is the last collection of Fritz Leiber’s LANKHMAR stories about those two loveable rogues, Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser. I had read all of the LANKHMAR stories up to this point but it took me a while to open this book because I just wasn’t ready for it to be over. Neil Gaiman says something similar in his introduction to The Knight and Knave of Swords and I’m sure that most of Leiber’s fans feel the same way. I know I can re-read these stories at any time, but it’s just not the same thing. It’s sad to know that Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser’s adventures are over.

The Knight and Knave of Swords, which has also been titled Farewell to Lankhmar (sniff!), contains these previously published novellas and stories: “Sea Magic” (1977), “The Mer She” (1978), “The Curse of the Smalls and the Stars” (1983), “The Mouser Goes Below” (1987) “Slack Lankhmar Afternoon Featuring Hisvet” (1988). The stories take place at the end of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser’s careers and, fittingly, are among Leiber’s final works. The Knight and Knave of Swords was nominated for the 1989 World Fantasy Award for Best Collection.

Last time we saw the duo, they were on Rime Isle with their current (and last?) lady loves and the men they now command. They had left their beloved and decadent capitol city of Lankhmar and traveled to Rime Isle when their help was requested by two “nubile” girls who asked them to come to Rime Isle to fight off the invading Sea Mingols. The boys and their crews were successful, but Fafhrd lost his left hand in the battle. During his convalescence, they just kind of stayed on and settled down with the two women they met there. Not only is this homey sedentary life surprising to F & GM, who are starting to feel a little restless and bound, but it’s very nearly scandalous! All of Lankhmar is talking about it:

“It is an old saw in the world of Nehwon that the fate of heroes who seek to retire, or of adventurers who decide to settle down, so cheating their audience of honest admirers — that the fate of such can be far more excruciatingly doleful than that of a Lankhmar princess royal shanghaied as a cabin girl aboard an Ilthmar trader embarked on the carkingly long voyage to tropic Klesh or frosty No-Ombrulsk. And let such heroes merely whisper a hint about a “last adventure” and their noisiest partisans and most ardent adherents alike will be demanding that it end at the very least in spectacular death and doom, endured while battling insurmountable odds and enjoying the enmity of the evilest arch-gods. So when those two humorous dark-side heroes the Gray Mouser and Fafhrd not only left Lankhmar City (where it’s said more than half the action of Nehwon world is) to serve the obscure freewomen Cif and Afreyt of lonely Rime Isle on the northern rim of things, but also protracted their stay there for two years and then three, wiseacres and trusty gossips alike began to say that the Twain were flirting with just such a fate.”

But it’s not just people who are scandalized; the gods are, too. All sorts of deities, including Loki and Odin (I don’t like the way Leiber tied Nehwon to our world that way), still have plans for the world’s greatest adventurers and F & GM’s retirement is not convenient for these selfish godlings. And so they send various trials and temptations that they hope will tear the guys away from their ladies. Thus, F & GM have to dodge beautiful (nubile) girls, assassins, stowaway princesses, and curses. They get tricked, captured, tied up, shaved, beribboned, and rescued. They even find out that they have children they didn’t know of.

It’s all quite fun for the first half of the book, but it starts to drag later as F & GM spend less time adventuring and more time reminiscing (again) about all the adventures they’ve had (even the “erotic” ones) and all the (nubile) girls they’ve known. One story (“The Mouser Goes Below”), in which Mouser gets buried under ice, goes on way too long and, regrettably, displays the kind of icky lechery I mentioned in my review of the previous collection, Swords and Ice Magic. It seems that the older Leiber got, the younger and more “nubile” became the girls in his stories. There are numerous mentions (mostly by Mouser) of budding breasts and girls playing erotically with each other while he watches. Just yuck.
Despite this, Fafhrd is one of my favorite fantasy heroes. He’s a big barbarian with an open mind, an appreciation of beauty, a sense of wonder about the universe, a bent toward philosophy and a pretty way of saying things. We often see him wondering what’s over the horizon, across the sea, or up in the sky. He’s not formally educated, but he’s observant like a scientist. In one scene he’s on a ship and a companion mentions the stars disappearing in the daytime. But Fafhrd, who watches, knows the truth:

“The stars march west across the sky each night in the same formations which we recognize year after year, dozen years after dozen, and I would guess gross after gross. They do not skitter for the horizon when day breaks or seek out lairs and earth holes, but go on marching with the sun’s glare, hiding their lights under cover of day.”

As you can see, not only are Leiber’s stories usually fun, but they’re also a delight to the mind and ear.

“Legends travel on rainbow wings and sport gaudy colors… while truth plods on in sober garb.”

I listened to the audio version of all of the LANKHMAR stories. These were produced by Audible Studios and narrated by one of my favorite readers, Jonathan Davis. He is at his very best in these productions and I highly recommend them in audio format. They are simply excellent. Each audiobook is introduced by Neil Gaiman (who also narrates his introductions).

Goodbye, Fafhrd and Gray Mouser. I’ll miss you.
Lankhmar Book 7: The Knight and Knave of Swords ebook
Author:
Fritz Leiber
Category:
Publishers
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EPUB size:
1909 kb
FB2 size:
1649 kb
DJVU size:
1675 kb
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Publisher:
Dark Horse Books; Reprint edition (December 2, 2008)
Pages:
224 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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