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Say Good Night to Insomnia: The Six-Week, Drug-Free Program Developed At Harvard Medical School ebook

by Herbert Benson,Gregg D. Jacobs


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Gregg Jacobs has used the six-week program offered in Say Good Night to Insomnia to help thousands of insomnia sufferers at the Behavioral Medicine Insomnia Program at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The program succeeds by helping insomniacs change the way they think about sleep, making it a friend instead of an enemy.

At Harvard Medical School's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Dr. Jacobs has tested and developed a six-week, drug-free program that conquers insomnia in a large majority of patients. The first clinician to offer proof that insomnia can be overcome without drugs, Dr. Jacobs's program provides techniques for: Eliminating sleeping pills Establishing sleep-promoting habits and lifestyle practices Changing negative, stressful thoughts about sleep Implementing relaxation and stress-reduction techniques Enhancing peace of mind and reducing negative emotions. Say Good Night to Insomnia: The Six-Week, Drug-Free Program Developed At Harvard Medical School.

by Gregg D. Jacobs & Herbert Benson. Don't ruin a good today by thinking about a bad yesterday. Let it go. ― Anonymous. 19 MB·23,527 Downloads·New! as well as practicing professionals in the medical and biological sciences it discusses a broad range.

Just For Today get free read 30 days !!! Imagine an insomnia treatment that improves sleep in 100 percent of insomniacs, helps 75. .It is Dr. Gregg Jacob’s drug-free program described in Say Good Night to Insomnia.

Just For Today get free read 30 days !!! Imagine an insomnia treatment that improves sleep in 100 percent of insomniacs, helps 75 percent of insomniacs become normal sleepers, and allows 90 percen. com/?book 0805089586). Written by. Lsadkmaky. Write the first response. Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight.

Introduction by Dr. Herbert Benson, author of The Relaxation Response A drug-free, scientifically proven program for conquering insomnia in six weeks. Imagine an insomnia treatment that improves sleep in 100 percent of insomniacs, allows 90 percent to reduce or eliminate their use of sleeping pills, and helps 75 percent become normal sleepers. Imagine a treatment that is safe and natural and has no side effects except improved mood, higher energy, increased mind/body control, and better health. No, this is not a new miracle drug.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Try another ZIP code. Delivering to. Now-FREE NextDay delivery. Gregg Jacobs offers a very practical guide, actually a program, to combating insomnia with cognitive behavioral therapy, basically training the reader to relax their body and mind and reduce stress stemming from living and also insomnia itself. Unlike Huffington's Sleep Revolution and some other books about the importance of sleep, Jacob's book focuses narrowly on specific tips and techniques to get a better night of it. While never downplaying sleep's importance, he wants readers to lighten up about it.

Say Good Night to Insomnia: The Six-Week, Drug-Free Program Developed At Harvard Medical School. C82C/Say Good Night to Insomnia The Six-Week%2C Drug-Free Program. The programme provides techniques for: establishing sleep-promoting habits and lifestyle practices changing negative, stressful thoughts about sleep implementing relaxation and stress-reduction techniques The book features scientifically proven methods for achieving greater mind-body control to improve not only sleep but also overall health and wellbeing.

Introduction by Dr. Herbert Benson, author of The Relaxation Response A drug-free, scientifically proven program for conquering insomnia in six weeks. At least thirty million adults ure the stress of severe, chronic insomnia, and the numbers of sufferers aregrowing. Dr. Gregg Jacobs has used the six-week program offered in Say Good Night to Insomnia to help thousands of insomnia sufferers at the Behavioral Medicine Insomnia Program at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The program succeeds by helping insomniacs change the way they think about sleep, making it a friend instead of an enemy. Among the many topics addressed are these: * Developing a sleep enhancing lifestyle including diet, exercise, and an understanding of the importance of body temperature * Stopping a depency on sleeping pills * Managing negative emotions, stress, and anxiety * Quieting the mind and body to enhance inner feelings of peace Say Good Night to Insomnia is an empowering book that lets insomniacs take control of their minds and bodies by giving them the knowledge and techniques to overcome their problem forever.
Joni_Dep
I have had mild insomnia for years -- waking up around 4 am on many mornings. My insomnia got much worse a few months ago and I found myself getting only 2-4 hours sleep each night. Prescription sleeping pills gave a night or two of some relief, but not more. While waiting for an appointment with a CBT therapist, I bought this book to get a head start on CBT. I read the book for an hour, and was quickly able to incorporate the restructured thinking about insomnia that the author recommends that same night - namely that you can survive and even thrive with insomnia. Just that restructuring led to improved sleep for the next 2-3 nights.

The other two pillars of approaching insomnia -- triggering the relaxation response and sleep restriction, take a little longer to see benefit from. My insomnia returned after the initial improvement (although my anxiety about it remained lower), but then I started implementing sleep restriction as recommended by the book: reduce your time in bed in order to build your sleep drive to overcome the middle of the night wakefulness. That has been working great -- it is enormously difficult to stay awake until my new bedtime, especially at first when I was going to bed at 12:30 and getting up at 6 AM, but it has greatly limited my waking up in the middle of the night, and I fall asleep again quite quickly. I can't really do anything other than fold clothes or play solitaire for that last 30 minutes before bed otherwise I will nod off. After 5 days of 12:30, I moved to midnight, and now I am going to bed at 11:30. I've only been awake in the middle of the night for more than 15 minutes once in the last 5 days. Fair warning -- for the first few nights of sleep restriction, my body fought back and I got very little sleep, just 1-3 hours, but then things began turning around.

Thanks to all the reviewers who left their stories -- just reading them helped lower my sleep anxiety and build my sleep confidence! I recommend reading the 4 and 5 start reviews yourself. Even the low reviews are just commenting on the style of the book, not the efficacy of the approach.
Unh
As others have said, this book may not work for everyone, but it worked for me! And it's sure worth a try.

The first thing you have to understand is that insomnia isn't an illness--which means it's not the problem you're *actually* having, no matter how agonizing your sleepless nights have been. (I know that agony: I've been there.) Insomnia is merely a *symptom* of whatever your real problem is.

But in the typical approach of so much of our medical culture, there are pills galore to help you sleep "better." Unfortunately, though, even if they work the first few nights, you'll develop a tolerance to them and start increasing the dosage, until you're ready to swallow the whole bottle--including the bottle itself! (I've been *there* too.)

What to do instead? Simply get to the root of what you're taking to bed with you every night, which is causing you to lie awake or have a really dreadful "sleep." And once you do, there are two parts to keeping it from interfering with your sleep from now on. Part One is to practice the Relaxation Response. This prepares you for a good night's sleep, and its technique Is fully detailed in the book.

Part Two--learn to practice something called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. This simply means taking a disturbing thought running through your head (or spirit) and asking yourself if it's really true or are you blowing it out of proportion? (E.G., "Well, here's another lousy thing happening to me!" . . . "Is that really true? Are lousy things always happening to me? What are the good things that have happened to me? And when lousy things do happen to me, haven't I always been able to resolve them? Sometimes for an even better outcome than if they'd never happened at all?"

If that sounds "feel-goody" (I initially thought that too), I'll close with a personal example. I moved to a new city for my career last summer, and when autumn came, I experienced a prolonged bout of insomnia--even though I'd never had insomnia in my life. It didn't help that I'd moved to the Pacific NW, which is notorious for continually grey skies in the autumn and winter, and very few daylight hours.

After using meditation, chamomile tea and a refusal to watch the news anymore--especially at night--my insomnia because manageable. Not cured, but manageable. Which meant I was tiptoeing around every aspect of my day to guard against anything that might upset me later that night, when I hit the sack.

So, the other night (January!), I fell into a pretty good sleep. And I awoke, fully alert and ready to start the day! Only problem was, my clock said 1:15 a.m. And I just knew I'd never get back to sleep that night. I had five more hours of wide-awake in front of me, not to mention a new day to drag myself through.

I got up, sat down in the living room and, for want of anything better to do, picked up my copy of "Say Good Night to Insomnia," and said sneeringly, "Okay, give me your best shot. (Though it won't work.)"

I stumbled onto the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy section and said to it, "No, I'm not anxious, I'm not angry at anyone, I'm not in physical pain, I don't have bright lights on, I didn't eat or watch TV after 8 p.m. There's nothing to talk myself out of. I just can't sleep!"

But after a while (hey, I had all night), a thought occurred to me: "What AM I taking to bed with me when I try to go to sleep and can't?"

It took me some time for honest self-reflection. And slowly realized I was depressed and a bit afraid because I hadn't been able to make friends in my new city as quickly as I'd wanted. It wasn't in my mind--I'd always brushed it off from my mind. But it was absolutely in my spirit.

And--typical of so many of us--I'd made it, subconsciously, into a sweeping statement of my life from then on: "I'll never make really good friends here. I'll be all alone, with nothing but grey skies and a few hours of daylight. What if I get sick? There'll be NO ONE THERE!

"No one cares if I live or die!"

Well, yeah, it wasn't so surprising that I had insomnia with thoughts like that!

So now I said, "Is that really true? I've *always* made really good friends, wherever I've gone. Almost everyone I meet really likes me and trusts me with things they wouldn't trust to anyone else.

"The problem isn't me, it's that people are just so busy today, they don't have time to keep up friendships.".

"Which means I'll never have any friends again!--they're all too busy! No one will care if I live or die!

"Is THAT true? Could there be others like me, who want to spend more time with real live people rather than do sound bites with faces on a screen? Do I really think I'm the only person in this city who feels that way? Is that a reasonable thought?

"And hey--I make a really good friend. All my friends in other places have said so!"

After another few minutes, I returned to bed, with only those good thoughts in my head. Next thing I knew, the alarm went off. And it's been like that ever since.

If you have insomnia, I urge you not to take the route of continual pill usage before asking yourself every night, "What am I taking to bed with me tonight?" If you come up with nothing disturbing, dig a little deeper till you find it. Because it's always something--sleep is *natural* when nothing gets in the way.

And then use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to deal with it. Pleasant dreams!
Jugami
I am currently dealing with Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) and one of the side effects is insomnia. Having gone 6 months without a decent night's sleep, I came across this book about CBT-I and decided to order it. I am a self-admitted skeptic but that characteristic was trumped by the fact that I was desperate for a decent night's sleep. I am in the middle of the last week of the 6 week program and I'm now a believer. Admittedly, the PMR pain wakes me often through the night but I can quickly fall back asleep after shifting my position. I no longer have to get up 2 or 3 times a night and read until I'm tired enough to try to sleep again. The Relaxation Response works well to get me back asleep.
To summarize, I went from 6 straight months of not sleeping through the night to sleeping through the night every night in the 5th week of the program. And that sure beats Ambien.
Dranar
This book has helped me sleep better in just two weeks. As a chronic insomniac, I'm not taking any sleep aids any more and I'm sleeping better than I have in years. The method uses biofeedback, relaxation techniques, and other simple methods to help induce sleep, but more than that it gave me a lot of info on sleep anxiety, circadian rhythms, the stages of sleep, and other things I didn't know about. Now I realize I just don't need as much sleep as most other people, and I've let go of that anxiety that I felt every night. Just relaxing about that has helped my sleep immensely.
Gralinda
This book kept me awake! Part of the plan requires you to keep track of how much time you spend awake as opposed to asleep while in bed. Since my problem is waking in the middle of the night (repeatedly), I had to look at the clock and make note of time elapsed since I last looked. SinceI never could remember by morning, had to write it down and this was counter productive to say the least. This just didn't work for me.
Say Good Night to Insomnia: The Six-Week, Drug-Free Program Developed At Harvard Medical School ebook
Author:
Herbert Benson,Gregg D. Jacobs
Category:
Diseases & Physical Ailments
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1925 kb
FB2 size:
1755 kb
DJVU size:
1189 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co.; 1 edition (January 13, 1999)
Pages:
240 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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