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The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California (Governing the Frozen Commons) ebook

by Christopher Chase-Dunn,Kelly M. Mann


Chase-Dunn, Christopher K; Mann, Kelly M. (Kelly Marie), 1971-. The comparative study of world-systems - Stateless world-systems - Indigenous systems in North America - The north valley of California - The valley and the hills - Spouses and allies - Wintu expansion - The whole system - Conclusions.

Chase-Dunn and Mann argue that Immanuel Wallerstein's world-systems perspective, originally applied .

On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors, the first case study to compare and contrast systematically an indigenous Native American society with the modern world at large.

On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors .

They contend that, despite the fact that the Wintu appear on the surface to have been a household-based society, this indigenous group was in fact involved in a myriad of networks of interaction, which resulted in intermarriage and which extended for many miles around the region.

Professor Christopher Chase-Dunn, Kelly M Mann. On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California, the first case study to compare and contrast systematically in indigenous Native American society with the modern world at large

The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California. This paper focuses upon one small region of World-Systems Theory (wst) but one that is important for analysis of the contemporary world: the dynamics of intra-core relations.

The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California.

For more help see the Common Knowledge help page. LibraryThing members' description. Original publication date. No descriptions found. Library descriptions.

Christopher Chase-Dunn and Kelly M. Mann. Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Rubinson 1977 "Toward a structural perspective on the world-system. amp;quot; Politics and Society 7, 4:453-76. The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Small World-System in Northern California, University of Arizona Press,1998. Volker Bornschier and Christopher Chase-Dunn (ed. The Future of Global Conflict London: Sage. Politics and Society 7, 4:453-76. Volker Bornschier, Christopher Chase-Dunn and Richard Rubinson.

The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California Christopher Chase-Dunn and Kelly M. Mann

The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California Christopher Chase-Dunn and Kelly M. On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors, the first case study to compare and contrast systematically an indigenous Native American society with the modern world at large

Chase, Christopher; Kelly M. Mann (1998). The Wintu and their neighbors: A very small world-system in northern California. Tucson: U. of Arizona Press. ISBN 978-0-8165-1800-5.

Chase, Christopher; Kelly M. p. 81. A collection of winter birds from Trinity and Shasta Counties, California" (PDF).

On the cutting edge of world-systems theory comes The Wintu and Their Neighbors, the first case study to compare and contrast systematically an indigenous Native American society with the modern world at large. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines sociology, anthropology, political science, geography, and history, Christopher Chase-Dunn and Kelly M. Mann have scoured the archaeological record of the Wintu, an aboriginal people without agriculture, metallurgy, or class structure who lived in the wooded valleys and hills of northern California. By studying the household composition, kinship, and trade relations of the Wintu, they call into question some of the basic assumptions of prior sociological theory and analysis. Chase-Dunn and Mann argue that Immanuel Wallerstein's world-systems perspective, originally applied only to the study of modern capitalistic societies, can also be applied to the study of the social, economic, and political relationships in small stateless societies. They contend that, despite the fact that the Wintu appear on the surface to have been a household-based society, this indigenous group was in fact involved in a myriad of networks of interaction, which resulted in intermarriage and which extended for many miles around the region. These networks, which were not based on the economic dominance of one society over another—a concept fundamental to Wallerstein's world-systems theory—led to the eventual expansion of the Wintu as a cultural group. Thus, despite the fact that the Wintu did not behave like a modern society—lacking wealth accumulation, class distinctions, and cultural dominance—Chase-Dunn and Mann insist that the Wintu were involved in a world-system and argue, therefore, that the concept of the "minisystem" should be discarded. They urge other scholars to employ this comparative world-systems perspective in their research on stateless societies.
Xcorn
These are our local Indigenous People. The local library will enjoy having this to read. thank you.
Gadar
I go this book for our tribes petition committee and it is helping us with our history to put in our petition
The Wintu and Their Neighbors: A Very Small World-System in Northern California (Governing the Frozen Commons) ebook
Author:
Christopher Chase-Dunn,Kelly M. Mann
Category:
Americas
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EPUB size:
1935 kb
FB2 size:
1408 kb
DJVU size:
1366 kb
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Publisher:
University of Arizona Press; 2 edition (October 1, 1998)
Pages:
310 pages
Rating:
4.8
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