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Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press) ebook

by Nicole Eustace


Nicole Eustace’s Passion is the Gale was such an important indicator of the potential of the history of emotions, precisely because it was explicitly styled as a history of eighteenth-century American emotion at a time when the history of emotions could boast only a few in-depth case.

Nicole Eustace’s Passion is the Gale was such an important indicator of the potential of the history of emotions, precisely because it was explicitly styled as a history of eighteenth-century American emotion at a time when the history of emotions could boast only a few in-depth case studies that put incipient theories and methodologies into practice (p. 3). The book aims at comprehensive coverage of the expression and experience of different emotions and the ways in which they changed, were inflected by race, class and gender, and became central to revolutionary affairs.

As Eustace demonstrates, passion was the gale that impelled Anglo-Americans forward to declare their ively at first, and then, finally, as individuals. Where should a history of eighteenth-century American emotion begin? We are used to regarding the eighteenth century as the Age of Reason and to seeing the Enlightenment as dependent on the faculty of thought.

Passion Is the Gale book. Hardcover, 613 pages. Published May 1st 2008 by University of North Carolina Press. Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution. 0807831689 (ISBN13: 9780807831687).

Originally published in 1961, this classic work remains the most comprehensive history of the many .

Originally published in 1961, this classic work remains the most comprehensive history of the many and important roles played by African Americans during the American Revolution.

Passion Is the Gale : Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution a Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press Ser. 505. 0. a Intro - Contents - List of Illustrations an. .

Passion Is the Gale : Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. a Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press Ser. a Intro - Contents - List of Illustrations and Tables - Introduction: The Rising Tempest - 1 ''Passions Rous'd in Virtue's Cause'': Debating the Passions with Alexander Pope, 1735-1776 - 2 The Dominion of the Passions: Dilemmas of Emotional Expression and Control in Colonial Pennsylvania - 3 ''A.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 01 March 2010. Recommend this journal. Export citation Request permission. Journal of American Studies.

Gale : Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution. At the outset of the eighteenth century, many British Americans accepted the notion that virtuous sociable feelings occurred primarily among the genteel, while sinful and selfish passions remained the reflexive emotions of the masses, from lower-class whites to Indians to enslaved Africans.

On emotions, see Nicole Eustace, Passion is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, V. 2008) and Sarah. 2008) and Sarah Knott, Sensibility and the American Revolution (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, V. 2009).

Published by: University of North Carolina Press. Early American Literature. Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution by NICOLE EUSTACE; New Men: Manliness in Early America by THOMAS A. FOSTER; Men of Letters in the Early Republic: Cultivating Forums of Citizenship by CATHERINE O'DONNELL KAPLAN; Citizen Bachelors: Manhood and the Creation of the United States by JOHN GILBERT MCCURDY.

At the outset of the eighteenth century, many British Americans accepted the notion that virtuous sociable feelings occurred primarily among the genteel, while sinful and selfish passions remained the reflexive emotions of the masses, from lower-class whites to Indians to enslaved Africans. Yet by 1776 radicals would propose a new universal model of human nature that attributed the same feelings and passions to all humankind and made common emotions the basis of natural rights. In Passion Is the Gale, Nicole Eustace describes the promise and the problems of this crucial social and political transition by charting changes in emotional expression among countless ordinary men and women of British America.From Pennsylvania newspapers, pamphlets, sermons, correspondence, commonplace books, and literary texts, Eustace identifies the explicit vocabulary of emotion as a medium of human exchange. Alternating between explorations of particular emotions in daily social interactions and assessments of emotional rhetoric's functions in specific moments of historical crisis (from the Seven Years War to the rise of the patriot movement), she makes a convincing case for the pivotal role of emotion in reshaping power relations and reordering society in the critical decades leading up to the Revolution. As Eustace demonstrates, passion was the gale that impelled Anglo-Americans forward to declare their independence--collectively at first, and then, finally, as individuals.
EROROHALO
Item as described. Thanks.
Bladecliff
This is a really interesting take on the study of emotion in the 18th century, and as a resource to understanding how 18th century people not only felt but emoted, I think it's fantastic. The prose is challenging but interesting, and while I would not call it comprehensive, it's an excellent addition to the intellectual and emotional history of the Atlantic World. It very much sheds light on the terms and means in which the period framed its critical personal and political issues. Not light reading by any stretch, but highly useful to the specialist.
SARAND
I appreciate the novelty of the argument of the author, but this is hard going even for someone seriously interested in colonial and cultural history. As always, this series with North Carolina produces an attractive book with a new approach, but the beauty is only skin-deep in this case. The prose makes for tough reading, the evidence is selective rather than representative, and the topic so narrowly concentrated that the author misses the wood for the trees. Yes, these were emotional times with conflicted characters, but is this surprising? Other than to give a little more of modern (painfully stretched argument at times) human face to some of these characters, what does all of this tell us about the period as a whole? Without answers to those questions (with serious supporting evidence) the book is little more than a reflective collection of observations.
Passion Is the Gale: Emotion, Power, and the Coming of the American Revolution (Published by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press) ebook
Author:
Nicole Eustace
Category:
Americas
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1786 kb
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1592 kb
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Publisher:
Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (February 1, 2011)
Pages:
624 pages
Rating:
4.6
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