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Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr ebook

by Michael Vinson Williams


Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). In this well-grounded inquiry into Mississippi's heart of darkness, Williams offers an essential reading of the short life and tragic times of Medgar Evers, the modest, heroic freedom fighter who, perhaps more than any other, helped transform the nation's most fiercely racist state.

Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr. The book is both thematic and chronological. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 2011. Michael Vinson Williams, assistant professor of history and African American studies at Mississippi State University, provides Medgar Evers: Missippippi Martyr, the first definitive biography of Evers. Though Williams's story opens in the early twentieth century, his narrative extends through Evers's lifetime and concludes in the present day.

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Civil rights activist Medgar Wiley Evers was well aware of the dangers he would face when he challenged the status quo in Mississippi in the 1950s and '60s, a place and time known for the brutal murders of Emmett Till, Reverend.

Civil rights activist Medgar Wiley Evers was well aware of the dangers he would face when he challenged the status quo in Mississippi in the 1950s and '60s, a place and time known for the brutal murders of Emmett Till, Reverend George Lee, Lamar Smith, and others. Nonetheless, Evers consistently investigated the rapes, murders, beatings, and lynchings of black Mississippians and reported the horrid incidents to a national audience, all the while organizing economic boycotts, sit-ins, and street protests in Jackson as the NAACP's first full-time Mississippi field secretary. Michael Vinson Williams. University of Arkansas Press, 1 нояб. Civil rights activist Medgar Wiley Evers was well aware of the dangers he would face when he challenged the status quo in Mississippi in the 1950s and '60s, a place and time known for the brutal murders of Emmett Till, Reverend George Lee, Lamar Smith, and others.

Michael Vinson Williams talked about his book, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr, in which he examines the life of Medgar Evers as well as his role in the history of civil rights

Michael Vinson Williams talked about his book, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr, in which he examines the life of Medgar Evers as well as his role in the history of civil rights. Medgar Evers was the first field secretary for the NAACP in Mississippi during the height of racial tension in the south. Medgar Evers was assassinated outside his home on June 12, 1963. People in this video. Michael Vinson Williams Adjunct Professor Mississippi State University- History Department. Hosting Organization.

Medgar Evers : Mississippi martyr Michael Vinson Williams. Medgar: our domestic killing fields

Medgar Evers : Mississippi martyr Michael Vinson Williams. Medgar Evers : Mississippi martyr Michael Vinson Williams. Download PDF book format. Medgar: our domestic killing fields. Summary, et. Civil rights activist Medgar Wiley Evers was well aware of the dangers he would face when he challenged the status quo in Mississippi in the 1950s and '60s, a place and time known for the brutal murders of those who challenged the status quo.

Academic journal article American Studies. MEDGAR EVERS: Mississippi Martyr. Successfully written as a greater representation of a man and his impact on civil rights, the book Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr covers so much more material than the title entails. Academic journal article American Studies. Williams sought out and discovered more than just who Medgar Evers was as a civil rights activist, but also the character of the man. These charac- teristics made Evers into the person destined make a difference in Mssissippi.

Michael Vinson Williams, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr. Bertis English, "Michael Vinson Williams, Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr," The Journal of African American History 100, no. 2 (Spring 2015): 335-337.

Civil rights activist Medgar Wiley Evers was well aware of the dangers he would face when he challenged the status quo in Mississippi in the 1950s and '60s, a place and time known for the brutal murders of Emmett Till, Reverend George Lee, Lamar Smith, and others. Nonetheless, Evers consistently investigated the rapes, murders, beatings, and lynching's of black Mississippians and reported the horrid incidents to a national audience, all the while organizing economic boycotts, sit-ins, and street protests in Jackson as the NAACP's first full-time Mississippi field secretary. He organized and participated in voting drives and nonviolent direct-action protests, joined lawsuits to overturn state-supported school segregation, and devoted himself to a career that cost him his life. This biography of a lesser-known but seminal civil rights leader draws on personal interviews from Myrlie Evers-Williams (Evers's widow), his two remaining siblings, friends, grade-school-to-college schoolmates, and fellow activists to elucidate Evers as an individual, leader, husband, brother, and father. Extensive archival work in the Evers Papers, the NAACP Papers, oral history collections, FBI files, Citizen Council collections, and the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission Papers, to list a few, provides a detailed account of Evers's NAACP work and a clearer understanding of the racist environment that ultimately led to his murder. Selfless dedication marked the life of Medgar Evers, and while this remains his story, it is also a testament to the important role that grassroots activism played in exacting social change during some of America's most turbulent and violent times.
Dorilune
I haven't read any previous biographies of Medgar Evers, but I would think it would be hard to top this one by author Michael Vinson Williams. Mr. Evers dedicated his life for the betterment of others, and it takes a special person to make the necessary commitment in order to implement change. Mr. Evers spent nearly three years in the military service to our country and correctly believed that it wasn't asking too much for him and others of his race to be granted the same rights as others in our country. Racism was alive and well in America during the decades of the 1950s and 1960s.

Some people long for those nostalgic days of yore when neighbors cared about one another, and helped each other in building barns, etc. What they fail to realize is that those Ozzie and Harriet days they long for in past decades was a white man's world, and our African-American citizens have nothing nostalgic to look back on.

Mr. Evers worked himself into exhaustion in the cause for civil rights for those who had them denied. This also caused a great deal of stress in his family. He attempted to integrate the University of Mississippi, but administrators kept changing the rules to make him ineligible. He later worked behind the scenes in the successful admission of James Meredith. Mr. Evers considered Mississippi to be his home, and he wasn't about to give the racists the satisfaction of moving out.

I did find parts of the book to be somewhat more detailed to suit me, but this in no way detracted from my interest in seeing the book through. This is a book that contains a lot of violence that was experienced by the Freedom Riders, and the issues in Birmingham, Alabama, that involved the aptly named racist "Bull" Connor.

I believe Mr. Evers would be very disappointed in what is taking place in our political arena today and all of the hate that is directed at President Obama, in addition to one party's effort to suppress voting rights in our country to favor their party's election chances. This practice takes place in our country while our soldiers fight and die so individuals in other countries can have the right to vote. God forbid we return to those days.

Mr. Evers was murdered in his own driveway on June 12, 1963, by a racist whose name is not worthy to appear here. I have been to Arlington National Cemetery, and have made it a point to visit the grave of one of America's heroes, Mr. Medgar Evers.
Nirad
Michael Williams' biography of Medgar Wiley Evers is a truly scholarly work that brings together numerous sources , both primary and secondary, that also gives us a comprehensive picture of who Evers was and what his importance is to the Mississippi civil rights movement.
As I read this work I was able to gain a sense of who Evers was as a person who refused to give in to the racists he lived among and how he was able to transfer his message to the African American community around him. We see who he was as a leader of young people he shepherded in the NAACP youth movement and a leader of all Mississippians, rich and poor, educated and lacking education, but always fighting the fight for what he saw as right and just.
Evers fought the battle for the right to vote as did many returning World War II and Korean War veterans did and he worked with all people, young and old, who were willing to devote themselves to that battle.
Michael Williams' book tells the story of a truly dedicated person, and if the reader wishes to dig deeper into the source materials, he provided us with comprehensive references.
Nalmergas
Dr. Williams has written a powerful, touching book about this forgotten, true American hero of the Civil Rights Movement. The book is very well-written with an emotional voice that is all too often lacking in many works of historical non-fiction. Dr. Williams account of the night of Medgar's assassination is heartbreaking--and it should be. I cannot imagine my children having to be told by their mother that I had been killed--it is unthinkable that they would have heard and seen it happen. Thus is the story of Medgar Evers and his family. If ever you have the opportunity to listen to Dr. Williams speak, he is even better in person. If you are a bit rusty on your Civil Rights history, and probably far too many Americans are, read this book. It will bring you up to speed quite well.
Saithinin
Another outstanding performance telling another story that really made me think of how far things have come. We need more people like this today. Great read!
Raelin
I have only one issue with the author. Otherwise an in depth look at the events that shaped the life of Medgar Evers. Very enlighten!
Cktiell
I really enjoyed this book. Very powerful, very well written. Medgar Evers deserves to be remembered for his work and not just his martyrdom, and Professor Williams's rich portrayal of Evers does him justice. I pretty much read this through in one session-it was that engrossing. From Evers's military service to his work with the NAACP, the Regional Counsel of Negro Leadership, and other such civil rights groups to his own willingness to stick his neck on the line by applying to the University of Mississippi's law school, there is much a biography of Evers needs to cover and Professor Williams doesn't give any period short shrift.

I highly recommend "Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr" and I hope to read more books from Professor Williams in the future.
Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr ebook
Author:
Michael Vinson Williams
Category:
Americas
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1207 kb
FB2 size:
1464 kb
DJVU size:
1634 kb
Language:
Publisher:
University of Arkansas Press (November 1, 2011)
Pages:
453 pages
Rating:
4.1
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