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Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb Throckmorton (Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas AM University-Commerce) ebook

by Kenneth Wayne Howell


Kenneth's Howell's short biography pubished in 2008 is the first since 1938. It grew out of his 2005 dissertation at Texas A&M University.

Kenneth's Howell's short biography pubished in 2008 is the first since 1938.

Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor book. Start by marking Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb Throckmorton as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

I took his advice to heart, completing my dissertation on James Webb Throckmorton at Texas A&M University in the spring of 2005. Unfortunately, Dr. Crouch passed away before I began work on this manuscript, but I owe him special thanks for sparking my interest in Throckmorton and for convincing me that a biographical study of this nineteenth-century Texan was a worthwhile project.

Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor : James Webb Throckmorton. 830. 0. a Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Commerce. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Howell, Kenneth Wayne. Power of the Texas Governor : Connally to Bush. Yellow Dogs and Republicans : Allan Shivers and Texas Two-Party Politics. by: Dobbs, Ricky F. Published: (2005).

by Kenneth Wayne Howell Because his life spans one of the most turbulent periods in Texas politics, Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor, the first.

by Kenneth Wayne Howell. Series: Texas A&M University Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life. Of the 174 delegates to the Texas convention on secession in 1861, only 8 voted against the motion to secede. James Webb Throckmorton of McKinney was one of them. Because his life spans one of the most turbulent periods in Texas politics, Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor, the first book on Throckmorton in nearly seventy years, will provide new insights for anyone interested in the Antebellum era, the Civil War, and the troubled years of Reconstruction.

James Webb Throckmorton, governor of Texas and Congressman, the son of Susan Jane (Rotan) and William Edward Throckmorton, was born .

James Webb Throckmorton, governor of Texas and Congressman, the son of Susan Jane (Rotan) and William Edward Throckmorton, was born on February 1, 1825, at Sparta, Tennessee. One of eight children, Throckmorton spent the first eleven years of his life in Sparta, where his father practiced medicine. In 1836 Dr. Throckmorton moved his practice to Fayetteville, Arkansas. Shortly thereafter his wife died. Book Overview James Webb Throckmorton of McKinney was one of them. by Kenneth Wayne Howell. Yet upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined the Confederate Army and fought in a number of campaigns. At war's end, his centrist position as a conservative Unionist ultimately won him election as governor.

Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb .

Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb Throckmorton. Книга 17.

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James Webb Throckmorton (February 1, 1825 – April 21, 1894) was an American politician who served as the 12th Governor of Texas from 1866 to 1867 during the early days of Reconstruction. He was a United States Congressman from Texas from 1875 to 1879 and again from 1883 to 1889. Following the outbreak of the Mexican–American War, he joined the 1st Texas Volunteers as a private in February 1847.

Of the 174 delegates to the Texas convention on secession in 1861, only 8 voted against the motion to secede. James Webb Throckmorton of McKinney was one of them. Yet upon the outbreak of the Civil War, he joined the Confederate Army and fought in a number of campaigns. At war’s end, his centrist position as a conservative Unionist ultimately won him election as governor. Still, his refusal to support the Fourteenth Amendment or to protect aggressively the rights and physical welfare of the freed slaves led to clashes with military officials and his removal from office in 1867. Throckmorton’s experiences reveal much about southern society and highlight the complexities of politics in Texas during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Because his life spans one of the most turbulent periods in Texas politics, Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor, the first book on Throckmorton in nearly seventy years, will provide new insights for anyone interested in the Antebellum era, the Civil War, and the troubled years of Reconstruction.
White_Nigga
James Throckmorton was Governor of Texas under Andrew Johnson's scheme of Presidential Reconstruction from August 1866 until removed in July 1867 by General Philip Sheridan exercising authority under Congressional Reconstruction legislation. Throckmorton is not an impressive historical figure but his political life is useful as a study in the failure pre-Civil War Texas Unionism and post-Civil War Reconstruction. Kenneth's Howell's short biography pubished in 2008 is the first since 1938. It grew out of his 2005 dissertation at Texas A&M University. Howell's focus is on the period between 1843 when the 18 year old Throckmorton immigrated to the then Texas Republic to 1874 which marked the formal end of Reconstruction in Texas. In a final chapter Howell briefly summarizes Throckmorton's five terms in Congress (1875-79, 1883-89) which he judges undistinguished.

In Howell's characterization Throckmorton comes off as a politician who did not grow beyond his roots in Collin County situated just south of present day Oklahoma in what was then the Texas Northwestern frontier. One of only 8 members of the Texas Secession Convention to vote against secession his unionism was highly conditional. He believed secession would leave North Texas vulnerable to Indian attack, end northern interest in investing in Texas railroads--always a major focus of Throckmorton's political agenda, and make North Texas--which he envisioned as a stronghold for white yeoman farmers--vulnernable to domination by the growing power of East Texas plantation owners. Howell makes a convincing case that while Throckmorton sincerely believed secession was a mistake he accepted secession as legal. His rejection of President Lincoln's constitutional authority to uphold the union by military force was decisive in his decision to support the Confederacy and eventually to accept a commission in the Confederate Army.

Howell also is convincing that Throckmorton was motivated in both his pre-Civil War and Reconstruction politics by an unwavering commitment to white supremacy which for him meant: (1) ending the Native American presence in North Texas by expulsion; (2) limiting to the maximum extent possible the African American presence by keeping Black Texans economically bound to their former masters in East Texas; and (3) according Black Texans only the most basic civil rights but not the right to vote or to equality with White Texans in the courts. As Governor Throckmorton accepted the reality but not the legality of the Thirteenth Amendment and he advocated the Texas Legislature reject the Fourteenth Amendment. His consistent hostility to all efforts by the Freedmen's Bureau and the Army to expand and secure the civil rights of Black Texans and his hostility to their White allies in the embattled Texas Republican Party were the justification for his removal as Governor.

This book is not an in depth examination of Reconstruction Era Texas and, at times, suffers from repetitiveness. It should be read in conjuntion with such recent studies as: Carl Moneyhon's Texas After the Civil War: The Struggle of Reconstruction" (2004) and the essay collection edited by Howell "Still the Arena of Civil War: Violence and Turmoil in Reconstruction Texas 1865-1874 (2012).
Qudanilyr
Interesting biography of a distant relative. Amazing that while he served as a governor of a Confederate State, another Throckmorton served as a governor of a Union State. Well written and informative, but a bit dry at times . . . but that often happens in a biography.
Texas Confederate, Reconstruction Governor: James Webb Throckmorton (Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas AM University-Commerce) ebook
Author:
Kenneth Wayne Howell
Category:
Americas
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EPUB size:
1394 kb
FB2 size:
1267 kb
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Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press (September 26, 2008)
Pages:
272 pages
Rating:
4.6
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