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Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution ebook

by David A. Clary


Occasionally, Clary gives over to cutesy Frenchisms (about Lafayette being wounded at the Battle of Brandywine, he writes, "If this was martial glory, très bien"). Still, on the whole, Clary has satisfyingly woven together grand military history with an intimate portrait of deep affection.

Clary tells the story of the friendship between Washington and Lafayette, and how Washington became a father figure to Lafayette

They were unlikely comrades-in-arms. Clary tells the story of the friendship between Washington and Lafayette, and how Washington became a father figure to Lafayette. The book doesn’t really tell the story of Lafayette’s contribution to the war effort, or at least not as well. I enjoyed Clary’s history of the Mexican-American war, and this book was just as good.

But the childless Washington and the orphaned Lafayette forged a bond between them as strong as any between father and son. It was an unbreakable trust that saw them through betrayals, shifting political alliances, and th. .

His money and connections attracted the favor of the Continental Congress, which advised Washington to keep the exuberant Marquis from getting himself killed.

The friendship and professional military collaboration of George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette is a.

The friendship and professional military collaboration of George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette is a commonplace of American historical scholarship. Most historians doubt that the disorganized and inexperienced Continental army could have won the war without the help of Lafayette and the aid that he coaxed from the French government. David A. Clary, who teaches at Eastern New Mexico University, has set forth the whole story in engrossing detail in this book.

Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution. Category: ry Period Biography & Memoir Military History.

The friendship and professional military collaboration of George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette is a commonplace of American .

Using personal letters and other key historical documents, Adopted Son offers a rare glimpse of the American Revolution through the friendship between Washington and Lafayette

Using personal letters and other key historical documents, Adopted Son offers a rare glimpse of the American Revolution through the friendship between Washington and Lafayette. The result is a remarkable, little-known epic of friendship, revolution, and the birth of a nation. Stay informed about books like Adopted Son and more from Penguin Random House.

But the childless Washington and the orphaned Lafayette forged a bond as strong as any between father and son, a trust . Their friendship continued throughout their lives

Lafayette inspired widespread French support for a struggling young America and personally influenced Washington's antislavery views. Washington's enduring example as general and statesman guided Lafayette during France's own revolution years later.

Lafayette and his entourage arrived on the outskirts of Philadelphia on September 27, 1824 and were entertained with an evening . Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution. New York, New York: Bantam Books.

Lafayette and his entourage arrived on the outskirts of Philadelphia on September 27, 1824 and were entertained with an evening ball in Holmesburg, Pennsylvania. They spent the night at the Frankford Arsenal. The next day an enormous, 6,000-man military escort drawn from the Pennsylvania militia was assembled. ISBN 978-0-553-80435-5.

Adopted Son Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution by David A. Clary and Publisher Bantam. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780553903423, 055390342X. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780553804355, 0553804359. The world’s eTextbook reader for students.

They were unlikely comrades-in-arms. One was a self-taught, middle-aged Virginia planter in charge of a ragtag army of revolutionaries, the other a rich, glory-seeking teenage French aristocrat. But the childless Washington and the orphaned Lafayette forged a bond between them as strong as any between father and son. It was an unbreakable trust that saw them through betrayals, shifting political alliances, and the trials of war.Lafayette came to America a rebellious youth whose defiance of his king made him a celebrity in France. His money and connections attracted the favor of the Continental Congress, which advised Washington to keep the exuberant Marquis from getting himself killed. But when the boy-general was wounded in his first battle, he became a hero of two countries. As the war ground on, Washington found in his young charge the makings of a courageous and talented commander whose loyalty, generosity, and eagerness to please his Commander in Chief made him one of the war’s most effective and inspired generals. Lafayette’s hounding of Cornwallis’s army was the perfect demonstration of Washington’s unconventional “bush-fighting” tactics, and led to the British surrender at Yorktown.Their friendship continued throughout their lives. Lafayette inspired widespread French support for a struggling young America and personally influenced Washington’s antislavery views. Washington’s enduring example as general and statesman guided Lafayette during France’s own revolution years later.Using personal letters and other key historical documents, Adopted Son offers a rare glimpse of the American Revolution through the friendship between Washington and Lafayette. It offers dramatic accounts of battles and intimate portraits of such major figures as Alexander Hamilton, Benedict Arnold, and Benjamin Franklin. The result is a remarkable, little-known epic of friendship, revolution, and the birth of a nation.
Armin
After reading another book about Lafayette, and having previously been interested in his relationship with George Washington, I decided this looked like something that I would enjoy reading. While I learned a lot from the book and there were many memorable moments, the book also has certain drawbacks.

The book actually starts off by depicting the scene between Washington and Lafayette after the battle of Monmouth, in which the pair sat on top of Washington's cloak and fell asleep side by side. From there, it details first Washington's then Lafayette's early lives before they met in 1777 and documents the many parts both men played in the American Revolution. After the war is over, the book mainly focuses on Lafayette's various political and diplomatic escapades in France. It includes some information about Lafayette's return to America in 1824 for the fiftieth anniversary of the American Revolution before finally wrapping up with his death in 1834.

I'll start with the good parts about this book. There is a plethora of information about both George Washington and Lafayette in terms of their roles in the American Revolution and what happened to them after it was all over. The portrayal of the genuinely affectionate relationship between two people, both of whom lost their fathers early, from different backgrounds is touching and it makes these two great men seem more human. The book also comes with a number of illustrations and pictures of the people the book is discussing. It was a nice addition that gave a few visuals to a book full of names, dates and places. I certainly learned a lot not just about Washington and Lafayette, but many other players in the American Revolution as well.

On the downside, however, this book is mired down with far too many details. I would have liked this book more if it had focused more on just the relationship between Lafayette and Washington, as it had a tendency to deviate from the pair in question as more and more people were introduced. In addition, it takes a few chapters before you get to the point where Lafayette and Washington actually meet and interact with each other, which was the reason I wanted to read this book in the first place. In short, I think some of the content could have been trimmed down and the book would have been better for it.

That being said, this is a very informative book. I did learn a lot of things I didn't know about the two of them by reading it and I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in Washington and Lafayette's relationship. If you don't mind reading some wordy and dense material, it is likely you will enjoy this book as well.
Kirinaya
Very well-researched book and it gave a good introduction to both men, their backgrounds, and their ultimate fate while mentioning all their acquaintances and the parties involved in the American Revolution. The inclusion of their letters along with a Who's Who list of names and titles was very helpful, and the paintings and illustrations added a needed visual element to a dense book that needs the reader's time and attention.

In the end, it seems both men affected one another in equal measure. Few men can leave their mark on history like Washington and Lafayette.
Coiril
"Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution" by author David A. Cleary gives us a masterfully researched narrative, providing insight presented with incredible detail. The story of the teen aged general from France who disobeys everyone in his country, from his father-in-law to his king, to set out in defense of liberty and in search of glory reads like an adventure novel. Cleary relates the story of how the orphaned Lafayette, in search of a father, bonds with the orphaned Washington, in search of a son. That neither were conscious of their search makes the bond they formed with one another that much more endearing.

Cleary does a very fine job of showing how Lafayette loved Washington, and of how Washington loved him back. The level of trust that Washington placed in Lafayette, especially in the time leading up to the decisive battle at Yorktown, was sobering. That Lafayette often was not able to be told the reasons behind many of his orders, but followed blindly nonetheless knowing that his `father' would never lead him astray, was at times touching.

It would be very easy to write a book on Lafayette describing only his highlights. How he was wounded in his first battle, and adored thereafter. How he was a hero in his adopted country even more so than in his homeland. How he fought for the end of slavery (and convinced his adopted father that slavery should be abolished). But to dwell only on the positive would not tell the whole story of Lafayette. Indeed, it is his flaws, especially those revealed much later in his life, that make the man human, and through contrast give his heroics more weight. The closing chapters of the book, and the closing chapters of Lafayette's life show a man who, anxious for the liberation of his own country, often finds himself at odds with the very people he is trying to liberate.

The American Revolution needed Washington in order to succeed. Washington needed Lafayette in order to succeed. That Lafayette was, by far, the most influential person when it came to France giving pivotal aid to the American cause of liberty cannot be understated. Without this aid, it is difficult to imagine a way that Washington succeeds.

An inspiring read containing a bibliography of source material that I know I will refer to again and again. 4.5 stars out of 5-stars.
Milleynti
I always knew about Lafayette's role as one of Washington's most able and trusted generals, but I never realized how incredibly close the two were until I read this book. It is a real eye opener. Essential reading for anybody who is interested in this period in US history
Bladecliff
I have learned more about both Washington and Lafayette by reading this book. It is a slow read as there are many quotes and parts of letters by both Washington and Lafayette in the book as well as some from their contemporaries. These are in the language of the time and in Lafayette's case English was his second language. It is well worth the effort for the value.
Adopted Son: Washington, Lafayette, and the Friendship that Saved the Revolution ebook
Author:
David A. Clary
Category:
Americas
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1860 kb
FB2 size:
1231 kb
DJVU size:
1962 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bantam (January 30, 2007)
Pages:
592 pages
Rating:
4.6
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