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Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and the Exploration of the New World ebook

by John Rennie Short


Cartographic Encounters book.

Cartographic Encounters book. As John Rennie Short argues in Cartographic Encounters, that mapping of the New World was only possible due to a unique relationship between the indigenous inhabitants and the explorers.

Cartographic Encounters : Indigenous Peoples and the Exploration of the New World. There s no excuse for getting lost these days satellite maps on our computers can chart our journey in detail and electronics on our car dashboards instruct us which way to turn. by John Rennie Short.

118+ million publications.

John Rennie Short (born 1951) is a professor of geography and public policy in. .2009 Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and The Exploration of The New World.

John Rennie Short (born 1951) is a professor of geography and public policy in the School of Public Policy at University of Maryland, Baltimore County. In that book Short elaborated the idea of national environmental ideologies though the depictions of wilderness, countryside and city in landscape painting, cinema and novels. Reaktion/University of Chicago Press, ISBN 9781861894366.

In this reinterpretation of . history, the author argues that, until now, writing about and popular understanding of the exploration and mapping of the New World has largely ignored the pivotal role played by indigenous people

In this reinterpretation of . history, the author argues that, until now, writing about and popular understanding of the exploration and mapping of the New World has largely ignored the pivotal role played by indigenous people

As John Rennie Short argues in Cartographic Encounters, that mapping of the New World was only possible due to a unique relationship between the indigenous inhabitants and the explorers

As John Rennie Short argues in Cartographic Encounters, that mapping of the New World was only possible due to a unique relationship between the indigenous inhabitants and the explorers. The exchange of information that resulted from this cartographic encounter allowed the native Americans to draw upon their wide knowledge of the land in the hope of gaining a better position among the settlers.

2009 Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and The Exploration of The New World. 2001 Global Dimensions: Space, Place and The Contemporary World Reaktion University of Chicago Press (Translated into Chinese),. 2000 Alternative Geographies. Reaktion/University of Chicago Press,. 2008 Cities and Economy.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and the Exploration of the New World. 0 Mb. The SAGE Companion to the City. Dr Timothy Hall, Dr Phil Hubbard, Professor John Rennie Short. 1. An Introduction to Political Geography.

Northern indigenous peoples experienced and represented the world and environment in very different, but no less. J. R. Short (2009) Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and the Exploration of the New World (London: Reaktion Books), p. oogle Scholar

Northern indigenous peoples experienced and represented the world and environment in very different, but no less. oogle Scholar. 11. D. Clayton (2004) Georgian Geographies ‘From and for the Margins’: ‘King George Men’ on the Northwest Coast of North America, in Ogborn and Withers (eds), Georgian Geographies, p. 2.

There’s no excuse for getting lost these days—satellite maps on our computers can chart our journey in detail and electronics on our car dashboards instruct us which way to turn. But there was a time when the varied landscape of North America was largely undocumented, and expeditions like that of Lewis and Clark set out to map its expanse. As John Rennie Short argues in Cartographic Encounters, that mapping of the New World was only possible due to a unique relationship between the indigenous inhabitants and the explorers.

            In this vital reinterpretation of American history, Short describes how previous accounts of the mapping of the new world have largely ignored the fundamental role played by local, indigenous guides. The exchange of information that resulted from this “cartographic encounter” allowed the native Americans to draw upon their wide knowledge of the land in the hope of gaining a better position among the settlers.

            This account offers a radical new understanding of Western expansion and the mapping of the land and will be essential to scholars in cartography and American history.

Dammy
This short book adequately makes the point that words such as "exploration" and "discover" are not fully adequate to describe how the New World was explored and mapped. The focus and most of the examples are on what is now the USA, and include a sizable number of federal government financed explorations of the Louisiana Purchase and the West generally (there is a small section about explorers in Australia that shows a similar situation). There was never a wilderness; it was all populated country, and the residents were guides for the "explorers." The book uses several terms, but something like "resident Natives" might work better. Explorers everywhere consulted natives for geographic help, and these folks sometimes made maps using explorers' pen and paper or may have described the lay of the land by using a stick and sand.

The point of the book is that initially understanding the new lands was a collaboration. It was only after time passed and settlement intensified that the native presence vanished from maps. Short uses early maps and journals to establish the presence of native peoples, and how important they were to "discovery." He makes a convincing case. The selection of maps and map portions used as illustrations is interesting, and a section at the very end has short excerpts from a number of journals and reports that emphasize native assistance and guidance.

Lewis and Clark, the Long expedition, Fremont's expeditions, the Railroad Surveys, they all used natives' reports and maps. Lewis and Clark, for example, did not venture into the wilderness--they had maps, which were based on French and Spanish materials, themselves based partly on natives' information.
kolos
A good book doing a good service. Short portrays the white exploration of North America (primarily) not as a tale of rugged, individualistic white men braving the wilderness, but explorers gathering information from the native peoples in a series of "cartographic encounters." Short skims expedition reports and maps for evidence (sometimes reading between the lines) of native informants. Short ably demonstrates this. He also has another parallel thesis: that Indians gave whites information for their own benefit, but that doing so sowed the seeds of their own destruction. When whites had the knowledge, they no longer needed indigenous information. This schemata works well with North America, but would fall down if he applied it to Latin America, thus the focus. That and the book is quite short and is a tad bit repetitive in places. It makes up for these drawbacks in its brevity and its ability to make you think. Recommended for all historians/enthusiasts of exploration, cartography, and Indian-white relations.
Cartographic Encounters: Indigenous Peoples and the Exploration of the New World ebook
Author:
John Rennie Short
Category:
Americas
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1937 kb
FB2 size:
1547 kb
DJVU size:
1645 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Reaktion Books; 2 edition (July 15, 2009)
Pages:
224 pages
Rating:
4.3
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