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The Devil Knows How to Ride: The True Story of William Clark Quantrill and His Confederate Raiders ebook

by Edward E. Leslie


Edward E. Leslie provides an objective treatment of his controversial subject, and readers will appreciate his ability to tell a good story-including the one about why Quantrill's bones currently rest in three different states and why . .

Edward E. Leslie provides an objective treatment of his controversial subject, and readers will appreciate his ability to tell a good story-including the one about why Quantrill's bones currently rest in three different states and why a forensically correct wax reconstruction of his head can be found in the refrigerator of an Ohio historical society. Born and raised a Kansan, not far from Lawrence, I grew up hating Quantrill and the unprovoked atrocities that he committed upon the people of Kansas, simply because they were against slavery. That’s what school taught me to do and so I did. Talk about your revisionist history.

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William C. Quantrill, the best known of the guerrilla chieftains, has been the subject of two earlier scholarly biographies in this century-one by William E. Connelly in 1910 and another by Albert Castel in 1962

The Devil Knows How To Ride: The True Story of William Clarke Quantrill and His Confederate Raiders. William C. Connelly in 1910 and another by Albert Castel in 1962. Connelly was predisposed to put Quantrill and his followers in the worst possible light, but Castel strove to be fair and to understand the viewpoints of both sides. His book was reprinted a few years ago and remains in print.

Quantrill rode into infamy, dying at the age of 27 near the war's end; his notoriety was assured both because of his own depredations and because among his soldiers were Frank and Jesse James and the Cole brothers.

Quantrill rode into infamy, dying at the age of 27 near the war's end; his notoriety was assured both because of his own depredations and because among his soldiers were Frank and Jesse James and the Cole brothers, who were to become famous outlaws. Leslie does a remarkably thorough job of telling Quantrills bloody story, and especially of relating the grisly fate of his remains, which the author traces as they traveled over the next century from one burial site to another, with an intermediate stop at an Ohio fraternity house. THE DEVIL KNOWS HOW TO RIDE: The True Story of William Clarke Quantrill and His Confederate Raiders.

The relentless scourge of Union men in Kansas and Missouri was born and raised in Dover, Ohio.

Author Edward Leslie takes a more objective look at William Clarke Quantrill's part of this irregular war in.

Author Edward Leslie takes a more objective look at William Clarke Quantrill's part of this irregular war in Kansas and Missouri. Leslie succeeds in providing the most objective examination to date of the violence in Missouri and Kansas.

The peak of his career came on August 21, 1863, when he led 450 men in a dawn raid on the staunchly Unionist town of Lawrence, Kansas, executing roughly 200 unarmed, unresisting men and teenage boys in what became the greatest atrocity of the Civil War.

William Clarke Quantrill was quite possibly the most dangerous man to fight in the Civil War. The leader of an. The leader of an almost psychopathic band of guerrilla warriors,.

Edward E Leslie, Patrick Cullen. This definitive biography of William Clarke Quantrill reveals the characteristics and events that led a quiet Ohio schoolteacher to become the most feared and notorious guerrilla of the Civil War. A virulently pro-slavery Confederate soldier and a brilliant tactician, Quantrill was a charismatic warrior who attracted hundreds of followers to his side-notably the teenaged Frank James, Jesse James, and Cole Younger

green striped box 2 (16 items) list by Robo. Manufacturer: Da Capo Press Release date: 22 August 1998 ISBN-10 : 030680865X ISBN-13: 9780306808654.

This is the first modern biography of the most famous--and infamous--soldier, rogue, raider, and terrorist to emerge from the Civil War. The Devil Knows How to Ride is based on memoirs, letters, diaries, and newspapers--all of which the author has skillfully converted in a biography that is almost sure to provoke controversy among Civil War historians and buffs alike. of photos.
Felolune
Born and raised a Kansan, not far from Lawrence, I grew up hating Quantrill and the unprovoked atrocities that he committed upon the people of Kansas, simply because they were against slavery. That’s what school taught me to do and so I did. Talk about your revisionist history. The border of Kansas and Missouri, from the early 1850’s thru the 1860’s and beyond saw some of the most violent, hateful, and reprehensible fights and attacks of the War between the states. This book delves deep into the lives, not just of Quantrill, but of most everyone involved. Contrary to popular belief, Quantrill did not strike the first, second or even third blow, and while no Boy Scout, wasn’t nearly as vicious as some of the sainted Jayhawkers like Jim Lane (who were mostly from Ohio and Indiana by the way), Union soldiers, or even Bloody Bill Anderson, his own follower (who had his own demons chasing him thanks to the Union incarcerating his sisters in squalor, just for being southern sympathizers - and subsequently being responsible for their tragic deaths.) A must read for any Civil War student, and definitely for every Kansan who thinks Jayhawk is a name of which to be proud. It isn’t.
Risteacor
William Clarke Quantrill was and is one of the most demonized military leaders of the Civil War. While this book did not shirk from covering Quantrill's atrocities and activities, it did place them in context of the time that they occurred. Leslie does a valuable service in explaining the Missouri/Kansas situation prior to the Civil War, and in also informing the reader about the men who rode with Quantrill and the people he fought.
The Border War of the late 1850's and Civil War is undoubtedly the most savage situation I am familiar with in American history. When compared with his Union contemporaries such as John Lane, Charles Dennison, and James Montgomery, Quantrill isn't a monster; rather he is one of a number of men who acted barbarically.
I recommend this book to anyone who wishes to learn about the western arena of the Civil War and the Kansas/Missouri conflict. I have pro-Southern friends who would not like the brutal honesty about Southern actions in the war. On the other hand, I know Northern apologists who, after reading this book, will not be able to one-sidedly bash the South, when, as they will see, there were plenty of Northern butchers, especially at the beginning of the conflict.
Fonceiah
As a native Missourian who grew up on the Kansasonian border, I have always been interested in the history of the area. Alas, I have not actually sat down to read extensively about William Clarke Quantrill. This book was an eye opener in all that I have been missing. Edward E. Leslie appears to have done extensive research on the life of Quantrill and his exploits. He was truly one of America's first terrorists, a renegade and guerilla. While one might think that the story ended when Quantrill died, but alas, story did not end with Quantrill's death, either. The fight over the man's bones up to today is both interesting and bizarre. At the end of the book, his bones still had not all been buried in one place. In some ways, this is the most interesting part of all. Although some may be critical on the writer's perspective and reliance of lack of some historical context, it is the author's privilege to write from his perspective and in his own style. Critics might pan the author's take on the numerous murders accounted in this book, but alas this is more factual than not during this period of time. This is why there are still some hard fast grudges held, to this day, from this Civil War era.

Leslie does a commendable job painting a realistic picture of a time when people's survival was day-to-day and the difference between life and death often depended on one's political sympathies. Leslie opened of my eyes more to the understanding Quantrill the man and his motivations. Besides good research and an easy writing style, another of Leslie's hallmarks is that he brings objectivity to the subject of which he writes. Many of the more incendiary allegations against Quantrill are presented very carefully. For example, Leslie takes issue with stories of Quantrill gleefully abusing animals as a youth and attributes them to a single source that had reasons for disparaging his character. Perhaps because of Quantrill's fierce reputation, many such stories about him were taken at face value when they were first published. This book was ideal for me, with only a basic knowledge of the Civil War and prefers not to sift through long narratives of troop movements, flanking maneuvers, and the like. The irregular nature of guerrilla operations makes for interesting reading. Leslie's attention to detail and fresh perspective on Quantrill ensures that Civil War aficionados will appreciate the book as well.
Hidden Winter
This is an awful story, but it's one that Americans should be aware of as it shows how bad things can be withouta laaw and order in our society. I wish the book was available as an audiobook, but I was able to use the CD;s without much effort. I an glad that I was able to read the book and learn more aboout this bit of American history.
Damdyagab
"The Devil Knows How To Ride" is probably the best account the William C. Quantrill's life on the market. It details his life from its humble beginning to its tragic end. It was a very pleasurable read. Even though it's not a light read at over 400 pages of text, I was still left wanting more. It does a very thorough job discussing his life prior to his great infamy as a Missouri partisan. It also ties his wartime exploits in very well with the other infamous people who either rode with him or crossed his path during the brutal Missouri war.

This book is extremely well documented relying on official military reports, contemporary news accounts, eyewitness accounts, and personal letters to sift through the legends surrounding Quantrill. I recommend it very highly to anyone with an interest in the western theater of the Civil War. You will not regret buying this book.
Xellerlu
Edward Leslie is a serious scholar and a tremendously talented storyteller. I purchased this book to fill in gaps in my knowledge of the early start to the Civil War in Kansas/ Missouri. It accomplished that, but it was also a very enjoyable read.
The Devil Knows How to Ride: The True Story of William Clark Quantrill and His Confederate Raiders ebook
Author:
Edward E. Leslie
Category:
Americas
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1818 kb
FB2 size:
1523 kb
DJVU size:
1307 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Random House; 1st edition (October 15, 1996)
Pages:
534 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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