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Travelling Heroes: The Greek In The Epic Age Of Homer ebook

by Lane Robin Fox


Robin Lane Fox turns out to be himself, in effect, the central travelling hero of his book.

Robin Lane Fox turns out to be himself, in effect, the central travelling hero of his book. He claims in the preface to have visited "almost all the places" that he talks about. His assured knowledge of maritime winds and currents, the flow of rivers, mountain glens and passes, and local flora and fauna continually ratify this boast. And running throughout are two areas of expertise that are evident without any external evidence: horticulture and horsemanship. This is someone who lives his history.

Robin Lane Fox rejects the fashionable view of Homer and his . This remarkable and daringly original book proposes a new way of thinking about the Greeks and their myths in the age of the great Homeric hymns.

Robin Lane Fox rejects the fashionable view of Homer and his near-contemporary Hesiod as poets who owed a direct debt to texts and poems from the near East, and by following the trail of the Greek travellers shows that they were, rather, in debt to their own countrymen. With characteristic flair he reveals how these travellers, progenitors of tales which have inspired writers and historians for thousands of years, understood the world before the beginnings of philosophy and western thought.

Travelling Heroes takes us on a dazzling journey throughout the . Foxes conclusion is basically that the Greek/Euboeans were aware of Near.

The Telegraph (London). Robin Lane Fox is a Fellow and Garden Master of New College, Oxford, and a University Reader in Ancient History. His books include Alexander the Great, Pagans and Christians, The Unauthorized Version, and The Classical World. Foxes conclusion is basically that the Greek/Euboeans were aware of Near Eastern religious practices largely through individual experiences both trading and settling in places like Crete.

Praise for Robin Lane Fox’s Travelling Heroes. Fox has produced a work of prodigious scholarship. The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian

Praise for Robin Lane Fox’s Travelling Heroes. A major contribution to Classical scholarship. Strongly recommended. Clay Williams, Library Journal. intellectual discipline is impressive. The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian. Lane Fox's survey deserves to be widely read. Indeed, I cannot think of a better introduction to the subject for those with no prior knowledge.

Travelling Heroes book. It combines a lifetime's familiarity with Greek literature and history with the latest archeological discoveries and the author's own journeys to the main sites in the story to describe how particular Greeks of the eighth century.

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Includes bibliographical references (p. -454) and index. Originally published in slightly different form in Great Britain as Travelling heroes: Greeks and their myths in the epic age of Homer by Allen Lane.

Includes bibliographical references (p. in 2008, and subsequently published in hardcover in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf.

Travelling Heroes is an adventure story: the tale of some 8th-century BC seafarers from Euboea (the second-largest . Robin Lane Fox begins with a simile from The Iliad.

Travelling Heroes is an adventure story: the tale of some 8th-century BC seafarers from Euboea (the second-largest island in Greece) who travelled outwards, east and west, to explore, to trade and to discover new worlds. The goddess Hera flies over the earth and the ancient poet, Homer, likens her restlessness to the cast of mind of a traveller who, having seen the world, will sometimes think, "I wish I were here, or I wish I were there. It is a sentiment a modern traveller can recognise nearly 3,000 years later.

Melipra
I'm a huge fan of Robin Lane Fox and his works and expected this to be a binding of Homer's literature to the history and geography of the times. Instead, it was more of a general history of ancient Greeks and their world.
Undeyn
Lane Fox admits his ideas are difficult to prove, but informed speculation is always a great intellectual joy, particularly if well written. The world of 8th century BC Greece comes to life.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
For the general public, this is a horrible book. It has all of the problems that accompany a scholarly thesis addressed to academia. It drones on and on proving and re-proving the same point, spewing out minutia. True, it has a few witticisms scattered here and there, but that cannot redeem it.

Besides being a slog to read, it is essentially a "poetic speculation," the idea being that the Greek and Phoenician sailors brought back stories of the far-off places they visited, and that these travelogues made their way into passages of the Odyssey. Proof of where these sailors took their trade goods is provided by pot shards. So pages and pages enumerating pot shards lead to the conjecture that the Labors of Heracles describing him as being in Spain are based upon what these sailors saw. Or the idea that Daedalus supposedly ended up in Sicily because there are pot shards in Sicily.

It becomes "poetic" because the mythical heroes are a reflection of the "real" traveling heroes -- the sailors themselves.

And while the book is all about pot shards, there is nary a word about the shards themselves. We learn that the shards in Sicily prove the Greeks were there in 750 BC, but we never see pictures of the shards or an explanation how the drawings on the shards tell us they are from 750 BC and how they differ from shards in 700 BC.

Isn't it obvious without 370 pages of dense text that Homer described things that he knew about, either by seeing it first-hand or having learned of it from someone else? I've never climbed Mt. Everest, but I might describe a difficult task as being like trying to climb it.
Whitebeard
I am an avid history buff, especially of ancient history. When I first saw this book - its title, its subtitle and its highly distinguished author - I knew that I had to buy it, so I did. I couldn't wait to devour its nearly 400 pages of main text. I was expecting a book written in a most engaging way such that I could hardly put it down. Unfortunately, for me, it fell far short. Although the book is well-written, even quite witty in some places, very authoritative, fully accessible to a wide audience and free of unnecessary jargon, I found it very difficult to follow. The most likely reason for this is the level of detail that it contains. In fact, I found that all the minutiae, i.e., many supporting discussions on pottery fragments, various digressions and side-stories, etc., were significantly distracting me from the main story line which, in my view, had so much potential. As a result, I may read this book again in the future, but with an entirely different mind set, i.e., one in which I want to slowly study the subject matter and not read it as one would a gripping novel, as was the case this time. Consequently, I feel that professionals in this field along with the most serious ancient history buffs would likely appreciate this work the most. Despite this review, I have given this book as much as four stars simply because of the vast amount of authoritative and fascinating details that it contains.
Travelling Heroes: The Greek In The Epic Age Of Homer ebook
Author:
Lane Robin Fox
Category:
Ancient Civilizations
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1828 kb
FB2 size:
1148 kb
DJVU size:
1486 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Allen Lane; 1st edition (September 30, 2008)
Pages:
512 pages
Rating:
4.9
Other formats:
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