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The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force ebook

by David Hobbs


A US Navy Essex-class carrier could carry 100 aircraft while the RN fleet carriers averaged only 65 making them much less useful in either offensive strikes or defensive combat air patrols.

Since apparently Downton Abbey is in reruns and Sequestration has us pondering the future of ‘american military mastery’, I thought this niche history might be of interest to some of the faithful

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist. Six months later it was strong enough to launch air attacks on Japanese territory, and by the end of the war it constituted the most powerful force in the history of the Royal Navy, fighting as professional equals alongside the US Navy in the thick of the action. How this was achieved by a nation nearing exhaustion after five years of conflict is a story of epic proportions in which ingenuity, diplomacy and dogged persistence all played a part.

a b c d e Brown, David; Titterton, G. A. (2013). Hobbs, David (2011). The British Pacific Fleet : the Royal Navy's most powerful strike force. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.

The British Pacific Fleet was the most powerful fleet the Royal Navy has ever . The new Pacific Fleet had to overcome some significant barriers.

The British Pacific Fleet was the most powerful fleet the Royal Navy has ever operated in combat, and for a period in 1945 operated alongside the vast American fleets in the Pacific, taking part in the invasion of Okinawa and the operations off the coast of Japan towards the end of the wa. An important part of this book looks at the impressive development of a British fleet train, which after a shaky start allowed the Royal Navy to take part in the invasion of Okinawa and to operate alongside the Americans in the final operations off the coast of Japan. Hobbs helps demolish some widely held views.

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist.

In August 1944 the British Pacific Fleet did not exist. Six months later it was strong enough to launch air attacks on Japanese territory, and by the end of the war it constituted the most powerful force in the history of the Royal Navy, fighting as professional equals alongside the .

This book is one of a series that takes a selection of the best models to tell the story of specific ship types - in this case, the various classes of warship that .

This book is one of a series that takes a selection of the best models to tell the story of specific ship types - in this case, the various classes of warship that fought in the First World War, from dreadnoughts to coastal motor boats. It reproduces a large number of model photos, all in full colour, and including many close-up and detail views. These are captioned in depth, but many are also annotated to focus attention on interesting or unusual features. It includes the opinions of . Navy liaison officers attached to the British flagships. US Naval Institute Press. How this was achieved by a nation nearing exhaustion after five years of conflict is a story of epic proportions in which ingenuity, diplomacy, and dogged persistence all played a part.

The author, as a Royal Navy 'insider' occasionally shows himself to be in thrall to some of that service's mythology

The author, as a Royal Navy 'insider' occasionally shows himself to be in thrall to some of that service's mythology. The book is well - produced on good quality paper, there are some useful maps (including some striking contemporary US Navy target maps), and the photographic illustration is remarkable.

Kefym
David Hobbs has written a much-needed account of the Royal Navy carrier contribution to the fight against Japan at the end of the war. It is thorough, covering all aspects of the British decision to send a contingent to the Pacific as the war in Europe ended.

The author covers the back-story quite well, the defeat of Royal Navy forces at the beginning of the war in the Pacific and the eastern Indian oceans. He covers the smaller operations in 1944 against targets (mainly oil) in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) which gave them an opportunity to gain experience and test men, equipment and operational techniques.

Unlike many authors, he thoroughly covers the logistical pipeline that is necessary to refuel, resupply, refit and repair the fighting ships - a "fleet train" and system of bases the US Navy had perfected over the previous three years of war in the Pacific. The RN had to do this very much "on the fly" and is tribute to their administrative abilities that they put together a logistics system just barely sufficient for the task at hand.

The book moves on to cooperation with the US Navy for "Operation Iceberg" - the invasion of Okinawa - and strikes against the Japanese home islands. The British naval commanders were willing to learn from the US Navy and subordinate themselves to American commanders operationally. This was, in reality, all they could do since the British contingent was simply too small to operate independently.

Operations and strikes are chronicled with great detail: how many aircraft launched, how many developed engine trouble and turned back, how many tons of bombs were dropped, how many enemy aircraft were shot down, etc. The author obviously takes pride the the Royal Navy was alongside American ships at the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. The author finishes his account with accepting surrender of Japanese forces in Hong Kong and carrying repatriated civilians and former POWs home.

Photos of carriers, aircraft, refueling operations, battle damage, etc, are many and of high quality. The're worth half the price of the book in and of themselves!

I have a few criticisms though: firstly, the author fails to cover the poor doctrinal thinking ingrained in the Royal Navy between the world wars which left them very much behind the Americans and Japanese in regard to carrier operations. British naval aircraft were completely unsuitable and the RN had to use large numbers of American aircraft under lend-lease (over half of RN fighters were Corsairs or Hellcats while about a third of their strike aircraft were TBF Avengers) in order to fight.

Secondly, while the author extols the British carriers defensive armor (deservedly so), he doesn't tell the reader the price for that. A US Navy Essex-class carrier could carry 100 aircraft while the RN fleet carriers averaged only 65 making them much less useful in either offensive strikes or defensive combat air patrols.

Lastly, although it is an exhaustive account of British carriers in the pacific, there is little in the way of tales of combat and heroism. The book tends to be a tad dry and the general reader will find this book less interesting than the serious historian.

The author does so many things well and gives the reader so much information as well as the excellent photos that I am willing to still give this book four stars.
Kezan
The British Pacific Fleet provides a narrative of the BPF's history from its formation in Ceylon (modern-day Sri Lanka) in 1944 until it was dissolved in 1948. While the book focuses on the fleet's operations in this period, it also goes into detail on the very complicated logistical effort needed to sustain it during World War II. Hobbs goes into considerable detail on air operations conducted by the BPF and provides some very convincing analysis of how these raids were conducted and their results. The book also makes good use of personal accounts to illustrate the experiences of the fleet's sailors.

The book does contain some flaws, however. Hobbs' focus on carrier operations and logistics means that the experiences of the BPF's surface combatants aren't covered in much detail, even when they were involved in battles. The coverage of the 'big picture' political and military strategy developments which affected the BPF is also insufficient. While Hobbs is generally very even handed, he's too generous to the fleet's commander Admiral Bruce Fraser and doesn't cover the poor relationship which Fraser had with the Australian Government, or the considerable stresses which the overly ambitious construction program needed to support the fleet placed on Australia's war effort.

Overall, The British Pacific Fleet is a very solid history of this unusual, but important, part of the Royal Navy's history. It's a shame that Hobbs didn't provide a more rounded work by discussing the politics which affected the BPF, but nevertheless the book should be of wide interest.
Ustamya
This is a well-written and interesting book on a neglected topic (I even took it to bed with me on several occasions). The author is an ex-Royal-Navy officer who served on RN carriers post-WWII, and this professional background contributes a unique and useful perspective to his account. Due to the nature of the assignments given to the BPF, operational accounts mostly cover carrier strikes on land targets, and organizational background to these activities.

The book contains 16 chapters, and 12 appendices. Chapter titles are: (1) Background, Theory and Experience, (2) Forward Planning, (3) Evolution and Expansion, (4) Strikes against the Sumatran Oil Refineries, (5) Australia and Logistic Support, (6) Operation `Iceberg I", (7) Replenishment in Leyte Gulf, (8) Operation `Iceberg II', (9) Operation `Inmate', (10) Repairs in Australia and Improved Logistic Support, (11) Submarine and Mine Warfare, (12) Strikes against the Japanese Mainland, (13) Victory, (14) Repatriation, Trooping and War-Brides, (15) A Peacetime Fleet, and (16) Retrospection.

The book is reasonably well-footnoted, and has a good bibliography, including a significant number of primary sources. The book is of a compact size, and exhibits very good physical quality. It contains numerous black-and-white photographs (many from the authors' personal collection) and maps interspersed at appropriate points in the text.

Strongly recommended, if you are interested in the topic.
Shliffiana
I think anyone who has spent any amount of time learning about the Pacific Battles during WWII is aware that the USN fought the bulk of that theaters fighting while the RN concentrated on the Atlantic and Med and came over to the Pacific in force in late 44. And I’d like to think we all know that although not a large or modern force, the RN was in the Indian Ocean the entire time.

What I had NO CLUE of was how quickly and efficiently the RN went from not much more then a token force in early 44 to a full blown HAMMER of an ally in such a short period of time or how much pressure they were able to exert once they were up and firing on all cylinders. THIS book does an Incredible job of laying it all out for anyone and everyone and explains exactly how it was done
The British Pacific Fleet: The Royal Navy's Most Powerful Strike Force ebook
Author:
David Hobbs
Category:
Europe
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1242 kb
FB2 size:
1147 kb
DJVU size:
1635 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Seaforth Publishing (March 7, 2012)
Pages:
462 pages
Rating:
4.6
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