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THE BLACK DEATH An Intimate History ebook

by J. Hatcher


The Black Death book. In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, world-renowned scholar John Hatcher re-creates everyday life in a mid-fourteenth century rural English village

The Black Death book. In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, world-renowned scholar John Hatcher re-creates everyday life in a mid-fourteenth century rural English village.

With THE BLACK DEATH, author John Hatcher has made an intelligent and clever approach at describing what it was perhaps like for the Average John Q Citizen to experience the pandemic outbreak of the Black Death.

With THE BLACK DEATH, author John Hatcher has made an intelligent and clever approach at describing what it was perhaps like for the Average John Q Citizen to experience the pandemic outbreak of the Black Death, the "plague" caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, which came out of Central Asia and peaked in Europe in 1348-50, wiping out 30-60% of th.

With THE BLACK DEATH, author John Hatcher has made an intelligent and clever approach at describing what it was .

The Black Death remains the greatest disaster to befall humanity, killing about half the population of the planet in the .

The Black Death remains the greatest disaster to befall humanity, killing about half the population of the planet in the 14th century. John Hatcher recreates everyday medieval life in a parish in Suffolk, from which an exceptional number of documents survive. This enables us to view events through the eyes of its residents, revealing in unique detail what it was like to live and die in these terrifying times. With scrupulous attention to historical accuracy, John Hatcher describes what the parishioners experienced, what they knew and what they believed.

Hatcher's everyday story of country-folk in The Black Death is as colourful as an episode of Midsummer Murders" Financial Times. gripping read - part historical inquiry, part novel. a haunting combination of unobtrusive expertise and considerable imaginatio. he intimate history reads like a masterfully constructed thrille. either a work of bloodless historical analysis nor a piece of historical fiction, but a gripping combination of the tw. Times Literary Supplement.

The subject of the Black Death -the 14th-century pandemic that wiped out a significant percentage of Europe's . It is this lack John Hatcher seeks to address in his unusual new book, The Black Death: A Personal History. Personalizing the Black Death.

The subject of the Black Death -the 14th-century pandemic that wiped out a significant percentage of Europe's population- holds endless fascination for many of us. And there's no shortage of good books that offer details on its origin and spread, the measures taken by local governments to avoid or control it, the panicked reactions of people who witnessed it and escaped it, the gruesome details of the disease itself and, of course, the sheer volume of deaths. But much of this data is broad, general, spread out across the map of Europe It is this lack John Hatcher seeks to address in his unusual new book, The Black Death: A Personal History.

Authors: Hatcher, John. The Black Death: An Intimate History. John Hatcher is Professor of Economic and Social History and Chairman of the History Faculty at Cambridge University. Title: The Black Death: An Intimate History. He has taught the subject of the Black Death for twenty years and is the author of eight books on medieval history. He appeared in the Channel 4 series 'The Seven Ages of Britain' and advised on 'Bloody Britain', a Discovery Channel series with Rory McGrath, as well as a Channel 4 documentary on the Peasants' Revolt with Tony Robinson.

The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history. It struck in the mid-1340s, and killed about half the population of Europe within four years. The death toll worldwide is put at 75m. It had momentous social and economic effects.

The Black Death : The Intimate Story of a Village in Crisis 1345-50 John Hatcher is Professor of Economic and Social History and Chairman of the History Faculty at Cambridge University.

The Black Death : The Intimate Story of a Village in Crisis 1345-50. By (author) John Hatcher.

THE BLACK DEATH An Intimate History
Jwalextell
The template preceding this space for my review, was difficult because this is not genre fiction at all. Written by an expert on 14th century Europe, superbly well researched, it is a story made to demonstrate the condition of being alive during the plague. Each chapter begins with a factual account of the issue portrayed in that chapter, so that the reader has a better understanding of that particular matter. This is then followed by the portrayal of the village priest in action, or dealing with the matter. The main character, father John, is a very good man - so his actions, his worries, his efforts make him a character who will continue to live in my imagination. John Hatcher, the author, could focus simply on fiction, successfully.
Cordaron
I had read about the Black Death before but it was usually general historical accounts about the extent of the plague, its symptoms, the death toll, etc. So dry. I never read, and always wondered, how did people cope with it in their day-to-day lives. This book does a pretty good job of examining the lives of real people, both those at the bottom of the hierarchy and those above them. The author uses historical records from the village and re-creates some scenes and conversations to flesh out the history. He says in his introduction that he was torn between concentrating on the history, or fleshing it out into an historical novel so it’s something of both. Lots of facts and some personalities as well. I learned a lot about 14th England. I had always imagined people’s lives would be in total chaos and had no idea it was so well-governed, or of the huge role that the church played in people’s lives. I’m glad I read it.
fabscf
"Surely He shall deliver thee from the snare of the fowler, and from the noisome pestilence ... He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under His wings shalt thou trust: His truth shall be thy sword and buckler ... Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night; nor for the arrow that flieth by day ... Nor for the pestilence that walketh in the darkness; nor for the destruction that wasteth at noonday ... A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand at thy right hand; but it shall not come on nigh thee." - From Psalm 91, the comfort of Master John, as quoted in THE BLACK DEATH

With THE BLACK DEATH, author John Hatcher has made an intelligent and clever approach at describing what it was perhaps like for the Average John Q Citizen to experience the pandemic outbreak of the Black Death, the "plague" caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, which came out of Central Asia and peaked in Europe in 1348-50, wiping out 30-60% of the population.

In the Preface, Hatcher explains the conundrum he faced. While he didn't want to compose yet another historical survey of the plague's progress across Europe - so many of such already exist - he also didn't want to create a completely fictional historical novel. Rather, to pen a narrative of the common man's personal experience with the disease - about which encounter there's virtually no contemporary description - John went to the public records as a starting point. In this case, they were the manorial court and accounts roles of the village of Walsham le Willows in west Suffolk, England, which are notably complete for the years in question. From these documents, the author populates the Walsham of his "docudrama" with people that really lived and engaged in the routine (and faithfully recorded) activities of life - marriages, births, deaths, petty crimes, personal legal squabbles, local elections, manorial court sessions, crop harvest yields, goods' prices, etc. - to thus paint a picture of the community's environment from 1345 to 1350, i.e. before, during, and after the Black Death struck in the Spring of 1349. Fictional dialogue between the characters, otherwise kept to a minimum, is inserted to flesh out the narrative and is based on reasonable supposition and what is known of the customs of the time.

Walsham's records have one glaring omission; there is nowhere recorded the name of the village priest. Out of necessity, then, Hatcher introduces his only completely fictional character, John Bradfield ("Master John"), God's shepherd for the parish of St. Mary's Church. As envisioned by the author, John is a learned, compassionate, honest, unworldly, wise, and pious cleric who assiduously cares for the spiritual well-being of his flock to the point, during the worst of the plague, of exhaustion; he becomes the hero of the piece. In that respect, the Walsham of THE BLACK DEATH was lucky indeed.

For those readers living in a western society where the various levels of government refrain from sponsorship of any organized religion, the importance of the Catholic Church to the everyday lives of the English commoners, as depicted in THE BLACK DEATH, may be a revelation. The central government, at this time the monarchy headed by Edward III, played virtually no role in attempts, beyond exhortations to the realm's various bishops to urge the faithful to increased prayer and penance against a background of more sermons, Masses, and powerful indulgences, to explain or protect its subjects from the pestilence as it marched inexorably across mainland Europe towards their island bastion. Master John, then, found himself at the pointy end of the only defense then believed able to potentially deflect God's wrath. The fact that the Church failed - indeed, could not but fail - does not detract from the fact that it tried. For those front-line clerics of the same honesty, competency, and dedication as Master John - and many such certainly existed (and died with the disease) - posthumous honor is due.

From an amateur historian's perspective, the second substantial lesson of the book is the change in the foundation of medieval society, i.e. the relationship of the villeins to their manorial masters, which the depopulation by disease precipitated. The surviving rustics got uppity in their demands for better wages and benefits - something they could pull off because of the resultant labor shortage - and their world was never the same again (much to the distress of the affluent Church and the landed nobility).

The volume includes a 27-page section of bibliography-based Notes and a 16-page collection of photographs of elements of paintings and illustrated manuscripts, all which support the nature of the society and environment which the author means to re-create.

Any casual or serious student of psychology, English history, and/or the effects of a universally devastating disease on societal structure should find THE BLACK DEATH convincing and absolutely fascinating. John Hatcher admirably achieved what he set out to do, and I think his book one of the best I've read all year.
Sharpbringer
I'm giving this five stars since it's a unique book that does wonders in introducing college students to the topic of the Black Death. I bought this for class but I'm glad I read it as I truly enjoyed it. It's written as a fictionalized documentary, closer in spirit to a traditional history book than a historical novel. Hatcher presents an overview of how the plague affected the village of Walsham, told mainly thorough the eyes of its parish priest, Master John. As the book progresses, we learn not only of the plague' effect but about the customs and ways of thinking of 14th century Englishmen. Great purchase!
Alien
This is a wonderful book that shares with you the inner workings of different parts of a village. You get a sense of how priest handled different situations and how villagers handing thens. You also get to see examples of what every day life was like in a village. I am amazed this books offers so much information on villages....very good examples of how they made money and or bartered for what they wanted.
Landamath
Fascinating historical novel by an author deeply familiar with both the part of England he writes about, and with the terrible plague that wiped out such a large part of England's population in the 14th century.
Balhala
Well written, informative and engaging.
Awesome and creative
THE BLACK DEATH An Intimate History ebook
Author:
J. Hatcher
Category:
Europe
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1340 kb
FB2 size:
1322 kb
DJVU size:
1757 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Orion; 1st Edition edition (2008)
Pages:
352 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
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