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The British Seaborne Empire ebook

by Jeremy Black


Jeremy Paxman thinks we're neglecting the history of the British empire.

Jeremy Paxman thinks we're neglecting the history of the British empire. But, by and large, no one has much to say about empire. On the other hand, the book also describes atrocities committed by the colonised in, if anything, even more gory terms: the "Black Hole of Calcutta", for example, "a horror story to rival anything among the Gothic tales which swept Britain" at the time.

The British Seaborne Empire Hardcover – September 10, 2004. Professor Jeremy Black, prominent lecturer and author, has given us in 370 pages an extensive history of England as shown through her merchant fleets and navy over hundreds of years. by. Jeremy Black (Author). Starting in the Middle Ages, when England was part of a Scandanavian Empire, all the way through to the late 20th century Canary Wharf, which at one time was a large dockland lauching pad for ships but is now converted to modern high rise buildings holding financial institutions and corporations (and much to the chagrin of Prince Charles, who called it a.

The British Seaborne Empire book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The British Seaborne Empire.

BlackJeremy, The British Seaborne Empire. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004

BlackJeremy, The British Seaborne Empire. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004. xii + 420 pp. ISBN: 0-300-10386-7 (hb. This chapter uses a wide range of archival holdings, in view of the classification barrier within government records, and reveals the scientific history of British ocean surveillance efforts during the Cold War, charting the history of developments in Gibraltar and the North-east Atlantic, and the ultimate development of the SOSUS network.

Sea-power made the British Empire what it was: without sea-power there would have been no empire, or at least no. .Jeremy Black is professor of history at the University of Exeter.

Sea-power made the British Empire what it was: without sea-power there would have been no empire, or at least no empire in the form it actually took. In this masterful analysis of the role of the sea in the history of the British Empire, Jeremy Black follows in the tradition of classic works by C. R. Boxer on the Dutch and Portuguese seaborne empires and by J. H. Parry on the Spanish seaborne empire. Read full description. Country of Publication.

Jeremy Black MBE (born 30 October 1955) is a British historian and a professor of history at the University of Exeter. He is the author of over 100 books, principally but not exclusively on 18th-century British politics and international relations, and has been described as "the most prolific historical scholar of our age".

The British Seaborne Empire. By (author) Professor Jeremy Black.

The British Seaborne Empire Jeremy Black. The navel element is carefully tracked but this is essentially one for those who are puzzled by the concept or nostalgic for the experience of empire'

The book addresses global decline, decolonisation, and the complex nature of post-colonialism and different imperial activity in modern and contemporary history

Focusing on the most prominent and wide-ranging empire in world history, the British empire, Jeremy Black provides not only a history of that empire, but also a perspective from which to consider the issues of its strengths and weaknesses, and rights and wrongs. The book addresses global decline, decolonisation, and the complex nature of post-colonialism and different imperial activity in modern and contemporary history. Taking a revisionist approach, there is no automatic assumption that imperialism, empire and colonialism were ‘bad’ things.

Jeremy Black's biography deals comprehensively with the politics, the wars, and the domestic issues . He is author of five previous books published by Yale University Press, including most recently The British Seaborne Empire. Библиографические данные.

Jeremy Black's biography deals comprehensively with the politics, the wars, and the domestic issues, and harnesses the richest range of unpublished sources in Britain, Germany, and the United States. But, using George III's own prolific correspondence, it also interrogates the man himself, his strong religious faith, and his powerful sense of moral duty to his family and to his nation. George III: America's Last King Yale English monarchs. Издание: иллюстрированное.

Sea-power made the British Empire what it was: without sea-power there would have been no empire, or at least no empire in the form it actually took. In this masterful analysis of the role of the sea in the history of the British Empire, Jeremy Black follows in the tradition of classic works by C. R. Boxer on the Dutch and Portuguese seaborne empires and by J. H. Parry on the Spanish seaborne empire. Black considers how the ocean affected British exploration, defense, trade, commerce, and the navy, as well as the attitudes and perceptions of the British people themselves.The book covers the process of imperial expansion, the decline of the Empire, and the role of the navy in the postimperial age. Attractively illustrated and wide in scope, the book demonstrates the profound influence that proximity to the sea has exerted on virtually every aspect of British history and culture.

Reighbyra
Professor Jeremy Black, prominent lecturer and author, has given us in 370 pages an extensive history of England as shown through her merchant fleets and navy over hundreds of years.

Starting in the Middle Ages, when England was part of a Scandanavian Empire, all the way through to the late 20th century Canary Wharf, which at one time was a large dockland lauching pad for ships but is now converted to modern high rise buildings holding financial institutions and corporations (and much to the chagrin of Prince Charles, who called it a rash of carbuncles) Black takes us along a journey of centuries, of the building up and the breaking down of the tradition that is England and its seaborne adventure.

Being an island, it has always been evident that England would take to ships, for not only fishing, but exploration, trade and import/export. Initially, shipping was used as a logistical means of moving superior English wool and cloth to the continent. Along with this, came the development of the navy. Naval strength in the 16th century was the single most costly, and technologically advanced weapons system of the period. Warships were effective mobile artillery platforms that were not possible on land. Advances in technology allowed for heavy cannon that could propel solid shot at long distances accurately, and would allow a stand-off naval battle, thus preventing boarding, although ships did come in close quarters and boarding was of importancce in a sea battle.

The largest crisis to face England in the reign of Elizabeth I was the Spanish Armada, and although outgunned and outnumbered, British tenacity held firm, and nature favored England after the battle by destroying much of the seemingly impregnable Spanish fleet.

The West Indies were exploited as a result of seaborne operations, where tobacco was swiftly introduced and brought back to England from St. Christopher, Barbados and other islands. British ships unfortunately also did a huge business in transporting slaves. Between 1691 and 1779, 2,141,900 slaves were taken from African ports (with the consent of local tribes)and Briish colonial ships took another 124,000. Most ended up in the West Indies and the balance in America.

It was through ships that settlers went to America and Canada and points farther away such as Australia, New Zealand and Africa. The dispatch of convicts to provide labor in the colonies (along with indentured servants) was important and a good instance of how colonies were to accomodate what was seen as a surplus population.

By 1650, England was engaged in a long naval struggle with the Dutch, which was not always successful, but by 1694 the Bank of England was established which facilitated trade across the globe and allowed England to create a funded national debt to help pay for the cost of war and trade.

In the years leading up to World War I, England was engaged in a costly arms race against Germany and her drive to build a large navy. For an island nation, a formidable navy is not a luxury but a necessity, and both sides poured enormous amounts of money into a race that drained resources and left other programs lacking, but during the war, England was able to thwart Germany's moves against her as far as surface ships, but the undersea boat was another matter.

In the years after the war, the empire faced difficulties in various regions. A rebellion in Iraq cost 40 million pounds to suppress, as well as the 25 million pounds per year to garrison troops there. With the accumulated debt from the war, austerity became more important. Winston Churchill made matters worse, when in 1925, as a sign of imperial power, he took the country back to the gold standard, which was disastrous for the economy. It was a futile gesture as more and more of the remaining colonial possessions were starting to show problems.

The world Depression of the 1930's reduced investment for colonial development and caused great financial difficulties at home and in the dominions.

By the time of World War II, when England did survive her darkest hours, it was evident that her place was to be greatly reduced in the world, and yet, the influence of a seaborne England are still very much with us today, in various parts of the globe and most importantly in the English speaking people all over the planet. There are those revisionists that attempt to defame the British colonial experiences (see Britain's Empire: Resistance, Repression and Revoltas well as others, but Black quickly denounces this as ahistorical.

I enjoyed this book very much. It is not a casual read. Professor Black does not waste words. His writings are concise but full of information and I would recommend this book for the serious historian.
Vizil
Excellent! I noticed that Britain and the British Seas (1902) is mentioned on page 9 of The British Seaborne Empire----another great book you will want to add to your reading list
The British Seaborne Empire ebook
Author:
Jeremy Black
Category:
Europe
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EPUB size:
1466 kb
FB2 size:
1966 kb
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Publisher:
Yale University Press; First American Edition edition (September 10, 2004)
Pages:
432 pages
Rating:
4.7
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