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Dunkirk: Fight To The Last Man ebook

by Montefiore Hugh Sebag


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Nicholas Hugh Sebag-Montefiore (born 5 March 1955) is a British writer. He trained as a barrister before becoming a journalist and then a non-fiction writer. His second book Dunkirk: Fight to the Last Man was published in 2006

Nicholas Hugh Sebag-Montefiore (born 5 March 1955) is a British writer. His second book Dunkirk: Fight to the Last Man was published in 2006. His previous book is Enigma: The Battle for the Code, the story of breaking the German Enigma machine code at Bletchley Park during the Second World War (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2000). His family owned Bletchley Park until they sold it to the British government in 1938.

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore was a barrister before becoming a journalist and then an author. This book tells how hard British troops often fought in the battles for the approaches and perimeter of Dunkirk. He wrote the best-selling Enigma: The Battle for the Code. One of his ancestors was evacuated from Dunkirk. However, once the author has finished with the anecdotes, he gives NO ANALYSIS of the story. If the Belgians and Dutch had given the British time to reach the "true" Dyle River line, could the British and French have stopped the Germans (not just the few troops sent through Belgium, but the whole German Army as anticipated)?

Includes bibliographical references (p. -660) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. -660) and index. 1. Moment of Truth - 2. The BEF Arrives in France - 3. The Mechelen Affair - 4. The Final Warning - 5. The Matador's Cloak - 6. Charging Bull - 7. Into Battle - 8. Over the River Meuse - 9. Flight - 10. Battle of the Bulge - 11. Lambs to the Slaughter - 12. The Arras Counter-Attack - 13. We Stand and Fight - 14. Escape from Arras - 15. Boulogne and the Useless Mouths - 16. Evacuation of Boulogne - 17. Calais and the French Complaint - 18. Calais - Fight to the Finish - 19. Lucky Breaks - 20. Siege at Cassel.

They were to fight to the last ma. he battle at Dunkirk would have turned out very differently if it were not for men such as Sergeant Major Gus Jennings of the Royal Warwickshire regiment who died smothering a German stick bomb in the church at Esquelbecq in an effort to save his comrades. he battle at Dunkirk would have turned out very differently if it were not for men such as Sergeant Major Gus Jennings of the Royal Warwickshire regiment who died smothering a German stick bomb in the church at Esquelbecq in an effort to save his comrades, and Captain Marcus Ervine-Andrews VC who single-handedly

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore was a barrister before becoming a journalist and . They were to fight to the last man. Hardly any of these brave men made it back to the beaches or the Dunkirk ‘mole’. He has written for the Sunday Times, the Sunday Telegraph, the Observer, the Independent on Sunday and the Mail on Sunday. But there is another aspect of the story that has not been properly understood.

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore examines the Dunkirk evacuation, and the men who fought so others could flee

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore examines the Dunkirk evacuation, and the men who fought so others could flee.

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore returns Dunkirk to history in Fight to the Last Man, a wartime history that Campbell Stevenson . What Sebag-Montefiore shows is that any army is only as good as its supply, communications and morale.

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore returns Dunkirk to history in Fight to the Last Man, a wartime history that Campbell Stevenson found highly readable. Amid this disarray come scores of individual stories. Private Bert Evans of the Royal Warwicks lost an arm in his escape from a barn in which dozens of his comrades were murdered.

Read Dunkirk, by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore online on Bookmate – The rescue in. .

Read Dunkirk, by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore online on Bookmate – The rescue in May 1940 of British soldiers fleeing capture and defeat by the Nazis at Dunkirk was not just about what happened at sea an. Outnumbered and outgunned, they launched spectacular and heroic attacks time and again, despite ferocious fighting and the knowledge that for many only capture or death would end their struggle. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

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Hugh Sebag-Montefiore's Dunkirk: Fight to the Last Man tells the story of the rescue in May 1940 of British soldiers fleeing capture and defeat by the Nazis at Dunkirk. Dunkirk was not just about what happened at sea and on the beaches. The evacuation would never have succeeded had it not been for the tenacity of the British soldiers who stayed behind to ensure they got away. Men like Sergeant Major Gus Jennings who died smothering a German stick bomb in the church at Esquelbecq in an effort to save his comrades, and Captain Marcus Ervine-Andrews VC who single-handedly held back a German attack on the Dunkirk perimeter thereby allowing the British line to form up behind him. Told to stand and fight to the last man, these brave few battalions fought in whatever manner they could to buy precious time for the evacuation. Outnumbered and outgunned, they launched spectacular and heroic attacks time and again, despite ferocious fighting and the knowledge that for many only capture or death would end their struggle. 'A searing story . . . both meticulous military history and a deeply moving testimony to the extraordinary personal bravery of individual soldiers' Tim Gardam, The Times 'Sebag-Montefiore tells [the story] with gusto, a remarkable attention to detail and an inexhaustible appetite for tracking down the evidence' Richard Ovary, Telegraph Hugh Sebag-Montefiore was a barrister before becoming a journalist and then an author. He wrote the best-selling Enigma: The Battle for the Code. One of his ancestors was evacuated from Dunkirk.
Paster
In her diary entry of June 12, 1940, Virginia Woolf wrote about the death of one man on the beach at Dunkirk, a death resulting from "not a wound--shock." Now having read Mr. Sebag-Montefiore's excellent book, I can only too well understand how that shock came about. While some readers may dislike the anecdotal stories, I for one greatly enjoyed them. Yes, there are plenty of maps, statistics and descriptions of military equipment, but that is not what makes or breaks a book for me. I want to know what individuals experienced, be it the miniature edition of Shakespeare's plays that one individual read while waiting in line at Dunkirk or the boy who cried when hearing that his dog could not come with him and his mother. My initial concern was over the number of chapters describing the events that lead up to Dunkirk, but in hindsight I can now say that those chapters were well worth the space taken up on my Kindle. If the ultimate strategy of survival (for those on board the sinking ship Lancastria) was to accept death with a smile, then knowing that some men could one minute sing "Roll out the barrel" and the next moment drown, I will indeed learn the lyrics of that song for my day of reckoning.
Hap
Being a WWII buff and having grown up in France as an American during the 50s, with many remnants of the war highly visible, I wanted to get a better understanding of what led up to the Evacuation of British Forces and the Capitulation of France in 1940. I heard a historian on TV saying, "if there is one book on Dunkirk, this is it". And while I now agree with the historian, there should be a warning before reading or buying that this book is more detailed than you ever want to know. The story is a simple one when looking from afar, but it is turned into the most minute detail. For those who want to know all that, it's great. The author has compiled an amazing of account of the blow by blow battles and evacuation, and key decisions made on the way. Only problem is, if you don't want to hear all that, but just get a basic understanding of what happened, it's a very long 500+ pages. Unfortunately, once you get into, as is the case with many books that are tedious, you feel vested and have the need to finish. At least I do.

If you want anything less than a detailed blow by blow account, this book is NOT for you.
Nalaylewe
Excellent
Fenrikree
This is a well-written book of 1001 ancedotes strung together to make a story. It's a difficult read, jumps around a lot, but does give the reader a feeling of what happened in the BEF. The author lauds personalities like Brooke and Montgomery unnecessarily and in a somewhat overwrought fashion, but, after all, this is strictly a British book. The Belgians are bit players, and the French get short shrift. Still, I recommend reading this book, although it will not do well on the shelf for reference.
Dawncrusher
Great book on one of the critical battles in the early war.
Ramsey`s
This book tells how hard British troops often fought in the battles for the approaches and perimeter of Dunkirk. However, once the author has finished with the anecdotes, he gives NO ANALYSIS of the story.

If the Belgians and Dutch had given the British time to reach the "true" Dyle River line, could the British and French have stopped the Germans (not just the few troops sent through Belgium, but the whole German Army as anticipated)? An important question, and from the anecdotes the author has selected, I think the answers are probably NO and NO--the Germans were just too good. But I would really like to read the author's analysis on this issue.

And why couldn't 400,000 of the best British and French troops hold on to one strip of land (Dunkirk)? Were they totally out of ammunition and unable to resist? Since defense is supposed to be more powerful than offense, they should have been able to fight off the Germans for weeks, not days. Why? Again, no analysis.

Forgive me, readers, but I don't like the Martin Gilbert approach that "history is a million facts listed one after the other". I may disagree with the author, but I would like to know what he thinks!!!!
Talvinl
Dunkirk: Fight to the Last Man is a very well-written and engaging story about both the Dunkirk evacuation and the fighting that led up to the Allies successful withdrawal. Under ordinary circumstances and without the pause in Hitler's panzas that permitted the British and the French to escape, Dunkirk should have been a slaughterpen equal to some of the massive encirclements and surrender of Russian armies in 1942 by the Germans. The French did bring some honor to their Army's tarnished reputation with isolated heroic actions to hold the Germans at bay and permit the bulk of the British troops to evacuate by sea, but, overall, this book reveals the dissension between the Allied armies, the lack of communication and coordination against their common enemy and helps the reader understand how narrowly Dunkirk succeeded for the many British troops who ultimately lived to fight again.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book which blended history with many personal touches. However, I do not accept that it is an appropriate book for kindle because one cannot access the many notes and maps referred to at particular places in the book. This is a pity as these references do much to illuminate the text.
Dunkirk: Fight To The Last Man ebook
Author:
Montefiore Hugh Sebag
Category:
Military
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1497 kb
FB2 size:
1308 kb
DJVU size:
1211 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Penguin UK (June 26, 2007)
Pages:
720 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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