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Megawatts and Megatons: A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age? ebook

by Richard L. Garwin,Georges Charpak


Garwin, Richard L. Bookplateleaf.

and other energy - Making best use of scientists - From arms race to arms control - Current nuclear threats to security - Can we rid the world of nuclear weapons? - - A turning point in the nuclear age? Notes. Garwin, Richard L.

Megawatts and Megatons is a marvelous and original book - partly a lively and readable physics text, partly a crucially . Will there be a turning point in the nuclear age, .

Megawatts and Megatons is a marvelous and original book - partly a lively and readable physics text, partly a crucially important policy analysis. a truly severs reduction of nuclear weapons, and a friendlier attitude to nuclear power?"-Hans Bethe, Nobel Laureate, Professor Emeritus of Physics at Cornell University.

With this book, Richard L. Garwin and Georges Charpak have done the best job at providing . Megawatts and Megatons: A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age? Hardcover.

Frank N. von Hippel, Science. I recommend this book for anyone with an interest in the technical description of nuclear power and weapons, nuclear policy, and recommendations new policy directions. 2 people found this helpful.

Georges Charpak, Richard L. Garwin. Novice and expert alike will come away from this book with new insights and a sounder basis for participating in the fateful nuclear choices before us in the twenty-first century. -John P. Holdren, Chairman, Committee on International Security & Arms Control, National Academy of Sciences "This book will be of great value to readers at all levels of knowledge.

They begin by explaining clearly and concisely how nuclear fission and fusion work in both warheads and reactors, and how they can impact human health.

In Megawatts and Megatons, two of the world’s most eminent physicists-French Nobel Prize laureate Georges Charpak and American Enrico Fermi Award–winner Richard L. Garwin-assess with consummate authority the benefits of nuclear energy and the dangers o. . Garwin-assess with consummate authority the benefits of nuclear energy and the dangers of nuclear weaponry. Garwin and Charpak begin by elucidating the discoveries that have allowed us to manipulate nuclear energy with increasing ease. They clearly and concisely explain complex principles of fission and fusion pertaining to nuclear weaponry and the generation of nuclear electric power

In 2001, Georges Charpak and his co-author, American Enrico Fermi Award-winner Richard L. Garwin, analyzed nuclear issues and their potential impacts on the environment, economy, public health, and world peace in their book "Megawatts and Megatons: A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age?" Born in Ukraine: Nobel prize Winners Ilya Mechnikov, Selman Waksman, Roald Hoffmann AND Georges Charpak.

Megawatts and Megatons book. These helped di Megawatts and Megatons by Richard Garwin and Georges Charpak was a book about the nuclear world. The book talked about both nuclear power and nuclear weapons. It discusses the need for nuclear power in the country and how it is used in other countries. It also discussed the massive amount of nuclear weapons in the world. It talks about the need to reduce the amount in the USA and Russia. I liked how the book broke up the endless facts with graphs, pictures, and comics.

Megawatts and Megatons Megawatts and Megatons is a marvelous and original book-partly a lively and readable physics text, partly a crucially important policy.

Megawatts and Megatons. A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age? Book by Richard L. Garwin, Author and Georges Charpak, Author. Publisher – Alfred A. Knopf. They clearly and concisely explain complex principles of fission and fusion pertaining to nuclear weaponry and the generation of nuclear electric power. They also make a strong and eloquent argument in favor of arms control. Megawatts and Megatons is a marvelous and original book-partly a lively and readable physics text, partly a crucially important policy analysis.

Megawatts and Megatons : A Turning Point for the Nuclear Age? . Making a strong and eloquent argument in favor of arms control, Garwin and Charpak outline specific strategies for achieving this goal worldwide.

For nearly sixty years the menace of nuclear war has hung over humanity, while at the same time the promise of nuclear energy has enticed us. In Megawatts and Megatons, two of the world’s most eminent physicists—French Nobel Prize laureate Georges Charpak and American Enrico Fermi Award–winner Richard L. Garwin—assess with consummate authority the benefits of nuclear energy and the dangers of nuclear weaponry.Garwin and Charpak begin by elucidating the discoveries that have allowed us to manipulate nuclear energy with increasing ease. They clearly and concisely explain complex principles of fission and fusion pertaining to nuclear weaponry and the generation of nuclear electric power. They also make a strong and eloquent argument in favor of arms control. More than ten thousand nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union, together with a similar number in the United States, have the capacity to destroy the world many times over. The “nuclear club” of nations is growing, with India and Pakistan its latest members and Iran, Iraq, and North Korea striving for admission. Even the possibility of a single weapon in the hands of a terrorist group—or a lone terrorist—poses a threat that we cannot ignore.Meanwhile, nuclear power already provides one-sixth of all electrical energy in the world—France, for instance, derives 80% of its electricity from reactors— but nuclear power has met with great resistance in the United States, where the specter of the Three Mile Island breakdown still looms in the public’s consciousness. Garwin and Charpak take a temperate, rational tone in evaluating the benefits of nuclear energy. They show how it can provide an assured, economically feasible, and environmentally responsible supply of energy in a way that avoids the hazards of weapons proliferation.Cogently written, passionately and carefully ar-gued—and featuring explanatory technical drawings as well as illustrations by the world-famous French cartoonist Sempé—Megawatts and Megatons is a thoughtful and important primer on two of the central issues of our time.
fetish
Although its authors fail to recognize that worldwide oil+natural gas extraction will certainly peak before 2015, this book is very timely. Garwin & Charpak write (p. 246) "We believe that one of the highest duties of society as a whole is to assess and to choose its destiny. In this book our goal is less to prescribe than to inform our readers of the options as we see them ... In considering nuclear energy we do not in any way intend to denigrate other approaches to providing for the needs of society -- including renewable energy, improved efficiency to reduce energy needs, and the like. Nevertheless, all these options will have direct and indirect effects on the environment." Nuclear power for electricity generation is one of their threads, the other is weapons and arms control which Garwin has worked on for many years mostly to point out the futility of defense against weapons not delivered by missiles and against missiles after decoys are deployed.
The book compares the success of nuclear power-plants in France (where reactors produce 80% of the electricity) with the perceived failures in execution in the US. The authors consider both direct (once through) disposal and reprocessed fuel cycles, outlining costs in energy and radioactivity release of both, and the mixed French experience with reprocessing and breeders. They note that advanced reprocessing has the potential to reduce waste volume and long-term radioactivity, at the expense of doubling release today (p. 198). They advocate research into uranium separation from sea-water, noting that early experiments are very promising that this can meet growing power needs for hundreds of years. Of course, what we really need are about 40 years of growth to bridge the world to a mix of fully sustainable electricity sources and to take up the growing slack from declining oil+natural gas. The authors first consider the bridging contribution of coal, arguing (p. 232) that CO2 sequestration is certainly feasible at the cost of reducing power-plant net energy output by 30-50%. Coupled with oil+gas decline, sequestration would reduce anthropogenic CO2 generation to levels well below the lowest 2100 projection of the IPCC (perhaps explaining the seemingly comatose response of Cheney/Bush to the Kyoto process). They discuss reactor concepts like the inaccurately named "energy amplifier" sub-critical, accelerator assisted thorium concept of Rubbia, but less discussion of nearer term developments such as the pebble bed modular reactors that seemed until 4/02 to be on track in South Africa. Both approaches are said to attain passive safety. If such designs are not debugged urgently, we will have to depend on expanded use of derivatives from technically "ancient" light-water reactors derived from submarine power-plants.
The authors also discuss opportunities for terrorists to divert enriched fuel from reprocessing and waste disposal, and note how attractive disposal sites will be for future warriors after all but the plutonium has decayed! They do not discuss the vulnerabilities of existing reactors, but do advocate burying the next generation of power-plants. A chapter on safety also advocates distributing potassium iodide tablets to saturate thyroids of those near power-plants undergoing "an incident"; failure to do this in a timely fashion at Chernobyl produced the criminally high incidence of childhood leukemia. (Until rationality overcomes PR, you can buy suitable KI on the Web. A single dose is useless!) They compare nuclear industry hazards to other industries, tabulating (p. 202) that the relative probability of dying from even a Chernobyl accident is minute compared to cardiovascular disease or "medical errors in hospitals". They discuss the effects of radiation at Chernobyl in detail. There are only a few typesetting errors, and a number of not funny cartoons; the illustrations are clear and useful. It is likely that for the next few decades, our choice in the US will be either a nuclear reactor within 50 miles or electricity rationing through extremely high prices. I plan to use this book in my upcoming college-freshman level energy course for non-science majors ..., and recommend it as a solid introduction to a complex but very real conundrum for our technically challenged society.
SARAND
This book is a must read for anyone wanting the true non-technical information
about nuclear power or weapons - and what to do with nuclear material.
Especially for those in the nuclear industries, this gives a very comprehensive
and non-biased overview of the important questions and motivations that
you probably will not get from your employers, written by
two who have been at the forefront since the beginning of the nuclear age.
Ungall
This book covers the science, history, current practice and issues of nuclear power and nuclear weaponry. The first several chapters go over the science of nuclear fission and fusion, and the technology used to harness it. This is accompanied by a short history of the development of nuclear weapons and power. The rest of the book then looks at the state of the nuclear industry around the world, both from a commercial, political, and technological standpoint, and how this compares with other energy systems such as the oil industry, coal industry, etc... The book covers the different types of reactors in existence and under design. The authors also give a good history of nuclear accidents, both in the reactors, and accidental release of radioactive waste. The book ends with chapters on how nuclear power has affected international relations, and what options exist in this area for the future. Overall a good book to read; highly informative and comprehensive. One minus that I found is that the authors are found of citing facts and figures and reproducing tables and graphs, without always including the corresponding references in the text. Instead, all the references are listed at the end of the book.
Rude
You might think Megawatts and Megatons subtitled "The Future of Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons" (paperback) would have different contents than the one subtitled "A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age" (hardback), like I did; however, with the exception of a new couple-page "Note to the Paperback Edition," I saw no differences. I'd suggest not falling for Amazon's Buy Both on these two, because you'll probably be disappointed to find out you got two editions of the same book.
Sti
If the second sentence of Chapter One is an accurate excerpt from this book, it is seriously flawed:
Excerpt from Megawatts and Megatons : A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age
Chapter 1
ATOMS, ELECTRONS, AND NUCLEI
All matter is an assembly of atoms. A liter of water, for example, contains about 1026 atoms of hydrogen and oxygen.
Please, tell me it isn't so. If it were, we'd be able to see those atoms, wouldn't we?
Megawatts and Megatons: A Turning Point in the Nuclear Age? ebook
Author:
Richard L. Garwin,Georges Charpak
Category:
Military
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1951 kb
FB2 size:
1367 kb
DJVU size:
1775 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf; 1 edition (October 2, 2001)
Pages:
412 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
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