liceoartisticolisippo-ta

Shame ebook

by Sam Cohen


Sam Cohen's book Shame is one of those few remarkable exceptions. The principle themes and characteristics of Sam's book are: 1. It's an inspiring story of dogged triumph over considerable childhood psychological torment and medical. It's very rare for any single book to really stand out in terms of many crucially important unvarnished first-hand historical & checks'.

Sam Cohen’s book Shame is one of those few remarkable exceptions. The principle themes and characteristics of Sam’s book are: 1. It’s an inspiring story of dogged triumph over considerable childhood psychological torment and medical adversity. 2. It’s a remarkable story of recognizing the right problem to solve.

For other people named Samuel Cohen, see Samuel Cohen . Thomas Powers, Trying to Save Zilchburg, New York Times, May 1, 1983 online.

For other people named Samuel Cohen, see Samuel Cohen (disambiguation). Samuel T. Cohen, 1982 photo. Sam Cohen and Joseph D. Douglass, Jr, "The Nuclear Threat That Doesn't Exist – or Does It?", March 11, 2003, online; Red mercury, fusion-only neutron bombs, Russia, Iraq, etc. -- North Korea's Nuclear Initiative, April 28, 2004 online. - Development of New Low-Yield Nuclear Weapons, March 9, 2003, online. RAND Corporation unclassified reports authored by S. T. Cohen, 1948–75 (includes neutron bomb studies).

Sam Cohen's book Shame is one of those few remarkable exceptions. The principle themes and characteristics of Sam's book are:1. It's an inspiring story of dogged triumph over considerable childhood psychological torment and medical adversity.

This book describes the life and times of Dr Sam Cohen, the father of the neutron bomb, from his early childhood fight up to the present. In a career spanning over 40 years, Dr Cohen has had dealings with US Presidents, powerful congressmen, statesmen, eminent scientists, and key figures in the US Defense Department. During World War II, Dr Cohen was assigned to the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, where he came into contact with such prominent scientists as Hans Bethe and Robert Oppenheimer

Jordan and Cohen later got into another heated verbal exchange, with Cohen telling Jordan shame on you and accusing him of trying to misrepresent his statements. Virginia Foxx, Cohen refused to rule out signing any book, TV or movie deals based on his experiences working with Trump.

Jordan and Cohen later got into another heated verbal exchange, with Cohen telling Jordan shame on you and accusing him of trying to misrepresent his statements. This might be the first time someone convicted of lying to Congress has appeared again so quickly in front of Congress. @Jim JordanThis is a total sham and Democrats know it. pi. witter. Cohen answered simply: No. He also refused to rule out running for political office in New York.

Город: Columbia, MOПодписчиков: 1 ты. себе: Books on '90s fiction, DFW, & The Clash. Writing about history of university presses. Opinions mine, not employer's, mine mine mine.

New Hampshire, United States of America.

It’s very rare for any single book to really stand out in terms of many crucially important unvarnished first-hand historical ‘reality checks’. Sam Cohen’s book Shame is one of those few remarkable exceptions. The principle themes and characteristics of Sam’s book are: 1.

It’s an inspiring story of dogged triumph over considerable childhood psychological torment and medical adversity. 2.

It’s a remarkable story of recognizing the right problem to solve, versus merely reinventing bigger conventional weapons in new technologies. The neutron bomb aimed at reducing the civilian slaughter that now characterizes large-scale war — conventional and otherwise. It makes the morally crucial and counterintuitive case that the neutron bomb is the most moral weapon ever invented, and is thus the best type of nuclear bomb ever invented. (Keep in mind the prior actual and continuing dependence on monster stockpiles of inherently indiscriminate civilian-slaughtering — and civilian life-support infrastructure destroying — city-obliterating bombs.) 3.

It’s a one-man American Perestroika and Glasnost movement, which honestly shows how many high-profile credit-mongering “Cold Warriors” and Cold War institutions were generally groups of cynical political opportunists who actually (and often knowingly) undermined real national security in their greedy lust for power, glory, and profit. 4.

It’s to the foreign policy, national security, and military-industrial establishments what Feynman’s myth-shattering activities were to NASA’s phony Challenger ‘investigation’ (doublespeak for ‘cover-up’). It’s an amazing chronicle of how a handful of remarkable people can sometimes prevail over enormously larger institutional packs of political animals dominated by self-serving groupthink. It puts on record the sort of ‘real world’ bureaucratic skullduggery that others will generally only speak about off the record, and often only after swearing you to secrecy. 5.

It shows why George Washington’s foreign policy advice — far from being allegedly obsolete — is actually becoming increasingly more important with proliferating advances in smaller and more powerful weapons.

Zaryagan
Sam Cohen was a brilliant, exceptional man, and this is one of the most important books that I ever read. It radically changed my thinking about the nature of warfare, and the motives of those who build weapons.
Hunaya
He must have been high when he wrote this, or sniffing neutron fumes, or something.

Basic premise: Sam's childhood trauma caused by an overprotective mother and her application of a succession of
enema treatments caused Sammy to build a neutron bomb that causes uncontrolable
nausea, vomiting, DIARRHEA, and death. I don't know that I buy any of that,
but Sam Cohen is tight with Ziggy's ideas, so that's between the two of them.
For the reader, there's all the background at RAND & associated cold-war, Mil-Industrial
hi-jinks that plays out along the way. We get to meet some the other characters,
some really intelligent bumblers, who with Cohen, helped shape the policy of MAD, as well as
many other doctrinaire joys of the duck & cover era.

Reads like a breeze, full of anecdotes and insights, and leave you wondering if the neutron bomb as conceived by Sam Cohen (an important point indeed) could really have had an important roll to play in the next world war, instead of being relegated to
use by minor players like China. After such an event passes, and the world is covered in radioactive dust, wouldn't it have been ever so much better to just kill everyone, and save the infrastructure and environment? It's all about the real-estate, after all, isn't it?

Well, that's the argument that Sam makes, as well as the humane aspects of utilizing neutrons in military theater, killing the soldiers, and saving civilian populations (and Bambi/bunnies too we must assume) from deadly, long-lived radioactive fallout.

Have a nice Dieoff!
Shaktiktilar
It's freely available on line as the author wants, at athenalab dot com and elsewhere.

It's the story of the author's dysfunctional upbringing, followed by his career in nuclear weapons beginning with the Manhattan Project, his tenure at the RAND Corporation, and his invention of the neutron bomb. The author felt isolated as a child, and then later as an adult with his persistently realistic look at something that almost no one he met wanted to discuss: how a nuclear war would actually play out, and how we and the rest of the world would emerge. This is a personal and cynical account of America's nuclear history and the asinine ways in which some of the gravest decisions imaginable were made.

Mr. Cohen didn't push the bomb because it was his pet invention; he invented it after being sent to Korea to observe a modern "limited" war firsthand, and seeing what was needed.

The neutron bomb is easy to understand. It's like a Claymore mine except that the ball bearings (neutrons) are much harder and tinier. It has no nuclear effects on the target --but that only holds true when it is properly burst at altitude so that the ground is beyond the reach of the small atomic blast required to propel the neutrons. Neutrons are so tiny that most of them fly right through tank armor and buildings unimpeded, the way most bird-shot would fly through a cyclone fence. But when a neutron hits something its own size and weight, namely a hydrogen nucleus, it's like a billiard ball colliding with another. Hydrogen is found in hydrocarbons, i.e. organic molecules --the molecules of life that you and I are made up of. In that case, neutron radiation can be deadly, but survivors recuperate within a month or two, and things on the ground are pretty much as they were.

How the bomb works and what it does takes up only three pages. The rest of the book introduces the reader to the many people that the author tried to sell his idea to. In almost every case, the author ends each episode by saying how ashamed he now is of how he dealt with that person. The more famous ones include former president Eisenhower, Pope John Paul II, the legendary genius John von Neumann, and others. The author doesn't seem to be just dropping names, though, admitting (for example) that he only saw J. Robert Oppenheimer in person once during his years on the Manhattan Project.

A web search turned up a photo of Trevor Gardner shaking hands with USAF General Bernie Schriever. The photo certainly seems to corroborate the text, and greatly enriched my reading about those two.

One notable exception to the author's shame: no punches are pulled on Linus Pauling, who "was barely interested in the scientific facts of nuclear weapon issues and almost always managed to fault the U.S. far more than the Soviets when bemoaning the nuclear arms race. For a guy whose scientific brilliance was beyond compare, he managed to ignore or make up the scientific facts surrounding the issues of nuclear war and the testing of nuclear weapons."

"Time after time Herman would nail Pauling to the wall for outrageous scientific distortion. On each occasion Pauling would shift gears and glibly change the subject, leaving poor Herman gasping for breath." I wonder if the author, with his history of induced diarrhea (by his mother), knew that Pauling advocated vitamin C mega-doses up to the "bowel tolerance limit"?

Ironically, the author virtually banished his book into obscurity by self-publishing it for free distribution. It didn't undergo the reviews and editing that would have improved the work. Grammatical errors and "mis-queues" caused me to pause and start sentences over. It is sometimes dull and repetitive, requiring patience. (Page 23: "sufficiently long enough.")

It still gave me a lot of insight about how nuclear weapons evolved. There's nothing terribly surprising here for those who have worked in aerospace. Mr. Cohen's invention underwent the same redneck caviling as any other new idea. (For example the AR-15, an innovative rifle that was mutated into the horribly unreliable M-16 and its derivatives by military curmudgeons who thought that the AR-15 should have a forward assist (to pick a change) just because it was something they were used to on their old rifles.) Likewise, when the neutron bomb was finally, grudgingly accepted to tip the U.S. Army's Lance missile, it was designed to detonate at ground level (ground burst) which defeats its purpose entirely.

The main points posited by the author:

* We don't really know how to fight a nuclear war with so-called "strategic" nuclear weapons, i.e. multi-megaton planet-busters (H bombs).

* It is a myth that nuclear weapons have to go in order for us to save ourselves in the Nuclear Age.

* While still in his twenties, the author gave a briefing to AF top brass including General Curtis Lemay himself. He reported what he describes as what the AF needed to know rather than what they wanted to hear. It was a big hit, and thus his career took off at RAND.

* As an offshoot of the USAF, RAND's reports were tailored to tell Air Force brass what they wanted to hear. What General Curtis Lemay wanted to hear was that we needed "strategic" nukes to wipe out an urban industrial center, as opposed to smaller-yield tactical weapons for use against enemy troops and armored columns.

* Reasons that the author posits the AF wanted strategic nukes: (1) If you kill enough of them they'll stop fighting; (2) In those days, strategic weapons were heavy and the USAF's heavy SAC bombers were the only means of delivering them. This shut out their rival, the Navy. And (3) the fear that the Soviets would develop an H-bomb first.

...The author doesn't mention this, but in fairness to Gen. LeMay, airplanes (especially after jet engines came along) were a reliable delivery method. Missiles were still pie-in-the-sky, and LeMay came from an era when complex systems often translated to unreliable junk.

Note regarding Harold Agnew (page 33): "He had been on the bomber that dropped the Little Boy bomb on Hiroshima." He may have been on the plane at some other time, but he was not on that fateful flight.
Shame ebook
Author:
Sam Cohen
Category:
Military
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1563 kb
FB2 size:
1835 kb
DJVU size:
1592 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Xlibris Corp; 1 edition (June 22, 2000)
Pages:
472 pages
Rating:
4.5
Other formats:
lrf lit txt doc
© 2018-2020 Copyrights
All rights reserved. liceoartisticolisippo-ta.it | Privacy Policy | DMCA | Contacts