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Virtual Caliphate: Exposing the Islamist State on the Internet ebook

by Yaakov Lappin


In 1924, the last caliphate-an Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran-was dismantled in Turkey.

In 1924, the last caliphate-an Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran-was dismantled in Turkey. With no state in existence that matches the radical Islamic ideal since, al Qaeda, which sees itself as a government in exile, along with its hundreds of affiliate organizations, has failed to achieve its goal of reestablishing the caliphate. An Islamist state that exists on computer servers around the world, the virtual caliphate is used by Islamists to carry out functions typically reserved for a physical state, such as creating training camps, mapping out a state's constitution, and drafting tax laws. Yaakov Lappin is a journalist for the "Jerusalem Post"

In 1924, the last caliphate-an Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran-was dismantled in Turkey. Yaakov Lappin is a journalist for the "Jerusalem Post". His groundbreaking and exclusive coverage of jihadi activity on the Internet has appeared in the "London Times, Jerusalem Post", and Ynetnews, among other media outlets. Books related to Virtual Caliphate: Exposing the Islamist State on the Internet. In Virtual Caliphate, Lappin shows how Islamists, equipped with technology to achieve a seventh-century vision, soon hope to upload the virtual caliphate into the physical world.

Virtual Caliphate: Exposing The Islamist State On The Internet. Dulles, Va. : Potomac Books, 2011.

2011) Virtual caliphate :exposing the Islamist state on the internet Dulles, Va. : Potomac Books, MLA Citation. Virtual Caliphate: Exposing The Islamist State On The Internet. These citations may not conform precisely to your selected citation style. Please use this display as a guideline and modify as needed.

In Syria and Iraq, Islamic State is on the brink of collapse

In Syria and Iraq, Islamic State is on the brink of collapse. The idea of an IS "state" is no more - nowadays, it exists mostly as a series of scattered insurgencies. However, there is lots that is wrong with the idea that it can simply retreat into a "virtual caliphate" and hope to be as powerful as it ever was. IS will not go away, but nor will it thrive like it has done these past few years - not least because its official propagandists are in tatters. Funfairs and bags of cash.

In 2011, I published my first book, Virtual Caliphate, which proposed that an Islamist-jihdadist state has been established on the internet. I argued that the jihadists were seeking to ‘upload’ their radical vision into the real world. Since then, ISIS created a physical caliphate, before international coalitions destroyed it, and now, once again, the caliphate has reverted back to virtual form

Published by: University of Nebraska Press .

Published by: University of Nebraska Press. An Islamist state that exists on computer servers around the world, the virtual caliphate is used by Islamists to carry out functions typically reserved for a physical state, such as creating training camps, mapping out a state’s constitution, and drafting tax laws. Lappin dispels for the reader the mystery of the jihadi netherworld that exists everywhere and nowhere at once.

The Islamic State group may soon be defeated in Iraq and Syria but a "virtual caliphate" could be harder to conquer .

The Islamic State group may soon be defeated in Iraq and Syria but a "virtual caliphate" could be harder to conquer, experts and officials have warned "Policy makers are focusing their attention on the wrong part of the internet, and that's problematic given that it's going to be a phenomenon to be dealt with in the next few years. Terrorists are now hiding in the deep web using encryption. There will always be a safe place for them on the internet regardless of what politicians like to sa.

The Islamic State, also known as ISIS, ISIL, and the Daesh, is a terrorist group located in Northern Iraq and Syria. The group sophisticatedly utilizes social media as a tool to spread terror around the world in addition to international recruitment. The group sophisticatedly utilizes social media as a tool to spread terror around the world in addition to international recruitment efforts. The Islamic State is widely known for its posting of disturbing contents such as beheading videos on the internet. The Islamic State creates its own online content such as videos, magazines (like Dabiq), and flyers.

My name is Yaakov Lappin, and I am an Israeli military correspondent and analyst. I am also author of Virtual Caliphate, a book that explores how Al-Qaeda operatives use the internet. In addition, I am the Israel correspondent for Jane's Defense Weekly, a leading international military affairs magazine, and for JNS, which provides news and analysis to readers around the world. In the past, I was the military affairs correspondent for The Jerusalem Post. If you'd like to organize a lecture.

In 1924, the last caliphate—an Islamic state as envisioned by the Koran—was dismantled in Turkey. With no state in existence that matches the radical Islamic ideal since, al Qaeda, which sees itself as a government in exile, along with its hundreds of affiliate organizations, has failed to achieve its goal of reestablishing the caliphate. It is precisely this failure to create a homeland, journalist Yaakov Lappin asserts, that has necessitated the formation of an unforeseen and unprecedented entity—that is, a virtual caliphate. An Islamist state that exists on computer servers around the world, the virtual caliphate is used by Islamists to carry out functions typically reserved for a physical state, such as creating training camps, mapping out a state’s constitution, and drafting tax laws. In Virtual Caliphate, Lappin shows how Islamists, equipped with twenty-first-century technology to achieve a seventh-century vision, soon hope to upload the virtual caliphate into the physical world. Lappin dispels for the reader the mystery of the jihadi netherworld that exists everywhere and nowhere at once. Anyone interested in understanding the international jihadi movement will find this concise treatment compelling and indispensable.
JOIN
Interesting view into how terrorist groups use the internet to further their goals. Written from a journalistic as opposed to a academic perspective but provides good material for further study. The author digs into how various terrorists recruit, build networks, and develop financial support through internet tools before discussing various methods to counter these approaches. A good read and relatively quick.
Dolid
Lappin's important identification and explication of Islamist Internet Jihad as a formidable and rapidly metastasizing religio-political cancer is a must-read for anyone serious about understanding the nature and scope of what the West is increasingly facing. Clear, sharp, insightful.
Deodorant for your language
A fascinating book on terrorism which exposes the vast network of underground jihadi communication via the web. As well as being an academic and expert on the global Islamist movement, Lappin is an investigative journalist at heart and in this book he excels in exposing terrorist networks throughout the world. Lappin mixes well between real life examples and academic theory behind jihadi terrorism, keeping the book both interesting and relevant. Lappin has opened my eyes to the extent of this worrying threat and I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in terrorist activity.
Arlana
Virtual Caliphate is an interesting and insightful first book from Yaakov Lappin. Its relevance to the world today cannot be underestimated but Lappin takes the reader on a journey. He doesn't assume prior knowledge, and instead builds up an idea from a basic understanding through to a sensible conclusion. The book has proved useful in my understanding of how Jihad has used the internet to try and achieve its motives and believe this book can appeal to any reader regardless of their knowledge of the topic.
Virtual Caliphate: Exposing the Islamist State on the Internet ebook
Author:
Yaakov Lappin
Category:
World
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1674 kb
FB2 size:
1984 kb
DJVU size:
1738 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Potomac Books (November 1, 2010)
Pages:
212 pages
Rating:
4.8
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