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Ordinary Mind as the Way: The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism ebook

by Mario Poceski


The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism. This book is concerned with a key phase in the history of Tang Chan.

The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism. The growth of Chan during this period paved the way for its dominant position within elite Chinese Buddhism and had signicant ramications for the later history of Buddhism throughout East Asia.

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By contextualizing Mazu's Hongzhou school within the Tang dynasty monastic milieu, Poceski reveals how .

By contextualizing Mazu's Hongzhou school within the Tang dynasty monastic milieu, Poceski reveals how Mazu was far from the antinomian iconoclast that Zen lore makes him out to be. As Poceski writes, " pious imagery of the Hongzhou school was formed on the basis of later apocryphal stories that portrayed Mazu and his disciples as instigators of a new iconoclastic ethos. He still, just in a different way. How so? you might ask. Read Ordinary Mind as the Way. As you can probably already tell from my past several posts, I am very interested in Mazu and his disciples.

Under the leadership of Mazu Daoyi (709-788) and his numerous disciples, the Hongzhou School emerged as the dominant tradition of Chan (Zen) Buddhism in China during the middle part of the Tang dynasty(618-907). Mario Poceski offers a systematic examination of the Hongzhou School's momentous growth and rise to preeminence as the bearer of Chan orthodoxy, and analyzes its doctrines against the backdrop of the intellectual and religious milieus of Tang China.

Ordinary mind as the way: the Hongzhou school and the growth of Chan Buddhism, Mario Poceski. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 9780195319965 1. Hongzhou (Sect)History. The Hongzhou school established an identity that revolved around the principles of discipleship and membership in Mazu's lineage, which were reinforced by the espousal of common religious attitudes and teachings.

Professor Mario Poceski’s Ordinary Mind as the Way: The . Toward the end of the first part, there is an important, original study of the Hongzhou school’s contribution to the spread and growth of Chan Buddhism in Korea.

Professor Mario Poceski’s Ordinary Mind as the Way: The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism aims at a systematic examination of the Hongzhou school of Chan Buddhism in Tang China, with Mazu Daoyi (709–788) and his major disciples as its central figures. This school, Poceski claims, represented the first emergence of an empire-wide Chan tradition and replaced the various fragmented schools of early Chan to become the bearer of Chan orthodoxy.

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Chan Buddhism in Ritual Context. Poceski, Mario (2007), Ordinary Mind as the Way: the Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism, Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-531996-5. 163. ^ Robson 2003, pp. 151–178. Preceded by Qingyuan Xingsi.

Mario Poceski offers a systematic examination of the Hongzhou School's momentous growth and rise to preeminence as the bearer of Chan orthodoxy, and analyzes its doctrines against the backdrop of the intellectual and religious milieus of Tang. ISBN13:9780195319965.

This book offers an examination of the Hongzhou School's momentous growth and rise to pre-eminence as the bearer of Chan orthodoxy, and analyzes its doctrines against the backdrop of the intellectual and religious.

This book offers an examination of the Hongzhou School's momentous growth and rise to pre-eminence as the bearer of Chan orthodoxy, and analyzes its doctrines against the backdrop of the intellectual and religious milieus of Tang China. British and Irish History: BCE to 500CE. European History: BCE to 500CE. History of Art: pre-history, BCE to 500CE, ancient and classical, Byzantine. Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval. Plays and Playwrights: Classical, Early, and Medieval.

Under the leadership of Mazu Daoyi (709-788) and his numerous disciples, the Hongzhou School emerged as the dominant tradition of Chan (Zen) Buddhism in China during the middle part of the Tang dynasty(618-907). Mario Poceski offers a systematic examination of the Hongzhou School's momentous growth and rise to preeminence as the bearer of Chan orthodoxy, and analyzes its doctrines against the backdrop of the intellectual and religious milieus of Tang China. Poceski demonstrates that the Hongzhou School represented the first emergence of an empire-wide Chan tradition that had strongholds throughout China and replaced the various fragmented Schools of early Chan with an inclusive orthodoxy. Poceski's study is based on the earliest strata of permanent sources, rather than on the later apocryphal "encounter dialogue" stories regularly used to construe widely-accepted but historically unwarranted interpretations about the nature of Chan in the Tang dynasty. He challenges the traditional and popularly-accepted view of the Hongzhou School as a revolutionary movement that rejected mainstream mores and teachings, charting a new path for Chan's independent growth as a unique Buddhist tradition. This view, he argues, rests on a misreading of key elements of the Hongzhou School's history. Rather than acting as an unorthodox movement, the Hongzhou School's success was actually based largely on its ability to mediate tensions between traditionalist and iconoclastic tendencies. Going beyond conventional romanticized interpretations that highlight the radical character of the Hongzhou School, Poceski shows that there was much greater continuity between early and classical Chan-and between the Hongzhou School and the rest of Tang Buddhism-than previously thought.
Ndlaitha
Most varieties of Chan and Zen Buddhism around today trace their roots back to Mazu Daoyi and his Hongzhou School. Which, as usual, means that layer upon layer of hagiographical distortion has--with intents both pious and polemical--obscured his and their specific historical reality beyond all recognition. And this process continues today in countless introductory and scholarly books on Chan/Zen in English. If we've read any of these, we more or less know the story. We've all come across Mazu the eccentric and iconoclastic monk with crazy wisdom spurning official honors on the margins of China's southern frontier. We've also come across Baizhang, his equally oddball disciple and original formulator of Chan's institutional independence. These depictions are vastly fascinating, deeply inspiring, and immensely entertaining--and pretty much false, as Mario Poceski shows in this excellent study.

Which makes him seem like just another debunker, but actually the bulk of "Ordinary Mind as the Way" is rather devoted to a careful reconstruction of just who Mazu and his Hongzhou Schoolers were and what they were like, based on a meticulous and judicious analysis of select textual sources actually dating to the Tang Dynasty (around the time Mazu and company were alive or soon after)--some recently discovered, some long extant but ignored since they didn't jive with the standard narrative, and others otherwise consistently misread in light of what we thought we knew. Poceski's arguments are careful, nuanced, and convincing, demonstrating that overall Mazu's Hongzhou Chan was in a way simply one variant of Tang Buddhism in general. Very much based in official monasteries and involved with social elites both in South China AND in the northern capitals (i.e. hardly marginal), very much observant of formal monastic disciplines and hierarchies and highly conversant with the Buddhist scriptural canon. And yet possessed of a distinct sense of religious identity with their own particular spin on the mainstays of traditional Tang Buddhism--that is, Poceski doesn't fall into the opposite extreme of utterly collapsing them into their context and unfairly deconstructing them into undeserved oblivion. Indeed, the balance he brings to his discussion is exemplary and downright refreshing.

Another strong point of the book is the manner in which it tackles the issues from both historical and Buddhological angles. In the first half, Poceski traces what can more or less be known for certain about the life of Mazu, his disciples, and the Hongzhou School's early development. In the second half, he focuses more on the particular religious teachings and practices of Mazu and company, ingeniously relating them to the wider Tang Buddhist context in sensible though surprising ways. Perhaps my own favorite example can be found on pages 142 to 143, where he takes a passage from one of Mazu's recorded sermons that sounds like the usual freewheeling rambling Zen discourse and then shows it to be an incredibly erudite patchwork of sutra quotations peppered with Mazu's own comments elucidating and linking them. According to the usual Zen stereotypes this is startling stuff, but there it is, it all makes sense. And it's every bit a fascinating form of Buddhism in its own right, making Poceski's discussion throughout something of an exciting recovery operation.

In short, despite its title, this is an extraordinary book, bound to be pivotal in the study of Chan and Zen Buddhism and extremely important as well for the study of Chinese religious history in general. And a joy to read, a plus never to be taken for granted when it comes to academic titles. Highly recommended.
Quinthy
Yells, slaps, and nose twists. No, I'm not talking about an episode of The Three Stooges; I'm describing how Mazu and the early Hongzhou ancestors are commonly portrayed in history. And if you're at all attached to those images of iconoclastic Buddhist masters shouting and eschewing seated meditation, then stop reading now because those caricatures have been revised.

Mario Poceski's Ordinary Mind as the Way, an outstanding work of scholarship worthy of the highest praise, dispels many of these stereotypes. By contextualizing Mazu's Hongzhou school within the Tang dynasty monastic milieu, Poceski reveals how Mazu was far from the antinomian iconoclast that Zen lore makes him out to be.

As Poceski writes, "[Later generations of Chan writers and adherents'] pious imagery of the Hongzhou school was formed on the basis of later apocryphal stories that portrayed Mazu and his disciples as instigators of a new iconoclastic ethos." So the images that we have today are the result of later generations' attempt to solidify the Hongzhou school's orthodoxy.

The reality of the matter is that "Mazu and his disciples come across as a group of monks grounded in the monastic ethos and canonical traditions of medieval Chinese Buddhism." Which is not to say that Mazu wasn't innovative or the Zen giant that history makes him out to be. He still, just in a different way.

How so? you might ask.

Read Ordinary Mind as the Way. As you can probably already tell from my past several posts, I am very interested in Mazu and his disciples. His approach to Zen feels so fresh and vital that I just want to get up and shout when I read his teachings. No joke, I really do. So yes, I am biased about the subject, but the truth is that Ordinary Mind as the Way is an incredible read, not only for dispelling myths about Mazu and clarifying his actual character and teachings, but for its incisive explication of Hongzhou doctrine, which is second to none.

Tathagatagarbha, Buddha nature, emptiness, sudden vs. gradual awakening, Poceski somehow manages to explain Mazu's complicated position on all of these subjects, and deftly at that I might add. Admittedly, the book is pricey, but worth every penny.
Ordinary Mind as the Way: The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism ebook
Author:
Mario Poceski
Category:
World
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EPUB size:
1967 kb
FB2 size:
1592 kb
DJVU size:
1218 kb
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Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 13, 2007)
Pages:
304 pages
Rating:
4.3
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