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Ghost Quartet ebook

by Richard Burgin


He has published nineteen books, and from 1996 through 2013 was a professor of Communication and English at St. Louis University.

He has published nineteen books, and from 1996 through 2013 was a professor of Communication and English at St. He is also the founder and publisher of the internationally distributed award-winning literary magazine Boulevard, now in its 31st year of continuous publication.

Ghost Quartet is a pageturner-first because Burgin knows how to pace a plot and, second, because his protagonists' . Opening this book is like stepping into quicksand. Richard Burgin's ingenius tales are disconcerting from the word g. The Los Angeles Times.

Ghost Quartet is a pageturner-first because Burgin knows how to pace a plot and, second, because his protagonists' interior monologues are so interesting in their own right. Man without Memory is a classic waiting to happen. The St. Petersburg Times.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Richard Burgin (Goodreads Author).

Ghost Quartet is a stunning exploration of love and ambition, sexual identity, and spiritual purpose. Set in the contemporary classical music world of New York and Tanglewood, the novel centers around the Faustian struggles of Ray Stoneson, a thirty-two-year-old composer, talented yet unrecognized.

While many readers may find Richard Burgin's work disturbing, there is no doubt he is a master storyteller

While many readers may find Richard Burgin's work disturbing, there is no doubt he is a master storyteller. Each word and phrase is carefully crafted and compels the reader forward. Often the endings do not seem to resolve much, rather they seem to hurl you into darkness, spinning and twirling, disoriented, and awash in loneliness, with an eerie sense of "it's not over ye.

Burgin explores universal themes of love, family, and time, examining relationships and memory-both. Five-time Pushcart Prize-winner Richard Burgin's latest book is a new and selected collection of his best 24 stories hat th. . Five-time Pushcart Prize-winner Richard Burgin's latest book is a new and selected collection of his best 24 stories hat the NEW YORK TIMES called Eerily funny. characters of such variety that no generalization about them can apply. May 3, 2016 ·. Today's the day! Hope to see you all there! TUE, MAY 3, 2016.

View on timesmachine. Ray Stoneson can't catch a break. The handsome 32-year-old composer had the perfect girlfriend - a down-to-earth soprano named Joy - but his caddish behavior drove her away.

Richard Burgin grew up in Brookline, Massachusetts and received a . from Brandeis University. His first published book was a collection of interviews he conducted with the Latin American writer, Jorge Luis Borges, while Burgin was still an undergraduate. Burgin later received a Master's with highest honors from Columbia University.

Burgin, author of three well-received story collections (Fear of Blue Skies . Misconceived from start to finish: an embarrassment

Burgin, author of three well-received story collections (Fear of Blue Skies, 1997, et., hits several sour notes in a tedious novel that exhaustively analyzes the emotions of a young classical composer who trades sex for career advancement. Misconceived from start to finish: an embarrassment. Read Burgin's short stories instead.

Richard Burgin is the author of 11 previous books, including The Spirit Returns, Fear of Blue Skies, and the novel Ghost Quartet. Three of his books were named Notable Books of the Year by the Philadelphia Inquirer. Burgin recently won his fifth Pushcart Prize, and he has had 15 other stories listed by the Pushcart Prize anthology as being among the year's best in previous years.

Set in the contemporary classical music world of New York City and Tanglewood, Ghost Quartet centers on the Faustian struggles of Ray Stoneson, an ambition thirty-two-year old composer. When Ray meets Perry Green, an internationally renowned, considerably older gay conductor who is desperately attracted to him, both of their lives change. Perry offers to further Ray's career in exchange for a relationship; but when Ray complies, it threatens his love for Joy, the beautiful singer he longs to marry.
Tisicai
Copyright 2000 San Francisco ChronicleRichard Burgin's three previous books of fiction were collections of short stories. Notable for their elegance and psychological insight, Burgin's best stories concern lonely people yearning to connect with others but stranded by their own swollen streams of consciousness. They thought too much and lived too little. Ray Stoneson, hero of Burgin1s accomplished first novel, "Ghost Quartet," is a world-class, Dostoyevsky-level brooder. It takes him hours, and a brisk walk along Manhattan's Upper West Side, to determine whether to attend a friend's party. Life roars on, but Ray feels that "people weren1t meant to be bombarded by events; we're too fragile for that, and yet life demands that we keep making choices." He hates having "to decide things while they are going on." An ambitious composer in his early 30s, Ray is desperate for popular and critical acclaim. Since talent and dedication have not brought success, he sustains himself by teaching private students. He also schemes to recover the trust of Joy Davis, who loved him but left because Ray was closed off, focused only on his career and personal needs. As he says, "I was a nervous, narcissistic, self-destructive child then." Because he plans each move well in advance and ponders the resonance of every comment, Ray suspects that everyone else is equally calculating. So he is always trying to be three steps ahead of the moment, a dithering Prufrock incapable of impulsive or decisive action. Then chance offers him the opportunity he craves. A renowned conductor and composer, Perry Green, will be at the party to which Ray has been invited. They meet; Perry is smitten and makes a proposal to Ray: In return for sexual favors, he will help boost Ray's career. "It was," Ray thinks, "such an outrageous coup that had happened to such an unlikely person that he had to be careful about how he would ultimately tell anyone." By the time Ray confronts his Faustian bargain, readers know him well enough to anticipate which way he will turn. Though he tells himself that it cannot be accepted, that he is straight and in love with Joy, that Perry already has a lover and that "there have to be some things that are objectively horrible," his concerns are counterbalanced by perceived advantages. It was "as if some kind of magician had invaded one of his deepest dreams and turned it around in broad daylight to end triumphantly." Readers can name that magician well before Ray can. Burgin is too sophisticated a writer and, unlike his main character, too clear a thinker to let his novel move toward the obvious end. "Ghost Quartet" is neither fable nor fairy tale, but a solid, sharp-edged novel. Everyone's ultimate gains and losses are believable, not programmatic, and sadder for their rightness. Life, it turns out, is not a composition. Its moments are not open to continued revision in the quest for structure or neat resolution. Ray learns that "with art, if you've made a mistake, all you've got to do is recognize itÐadmittedly not always easyÐand start in a new direction. With love, if you've made a mistake, you need the forgiveness of another person, or it1s hopeless." After all his waffling and grasping, Ray reaches a place of genuine knowledge. He also writes a piece of chamber music, his Ghost Quartet, that appears truthful to the life he has been living. Burgin's long practice in writing short stories reveals itself in his gift for creating vivid characters. Ray, though difficult company, is a fully rounded individual who, for all his introspection, cannot make sense of himself or those closest to him. Joy, aptly named, is a mix of idealized Woman and actual woman. She has a "spiritual decorum" that Ray lacks and, as he comes to understand, "she was not as central to her own sense of the universe as he was to his." Perry and his lover, Bobby, are alive on the page, flawed and noble in surprising contrast. The larger scope of a novel allows Burgin to explore more fully the connections between an artist's life and work. It is hardly news that a composer does not have to be a terrific person in order to make great music. But by looking candidly at the favors-for-fame game, Burgin shows how, in the interests of his career, a person can forget about his art, about the work itself, and lose his soul. The novel1s "dark drama," as Ray calls it, is conveyed with little external action. Not much seems to happen, and yet by novel1s end there has been love, death, betrayal and change. This is a rich story, nastily honest and impressively balanced, by a writer who has mastered his craft.
hardy
I'm not sure why the only posted review on this page is the slam by Kirkus Reviews. This book is getting great notices everywhere else -- the San Francisco Chronicle, etc. -- and it's earned them. This is a complex, unusual, carefully plotted novel about the perils of ambition in the music world. Burgin -- as usual -- has a terrific eye for the telling detail and a wonderful ability to create realistic, interesting, unusual characters. I'd recommend this novel to anyone.
SING
"Like a character in a novel by Knut Hamson or Hermann Hesse, who specialized in fiction about young artists paralyzed by doubt, failure and convoluted self-analysis, Ray Stoneson [the protagonist] proceeds on a path toward a meager enlightenment that can only come through major self-destruction. He is incapable of doing the right thing, yet he is consumed by guilt and remorse and the sort of deadly accurate hindsight that does no good in the present...when Burgin examines in terrifying and relentless detail the incapacitating effects of utter malaise and bad faith, he conjures a spirit not unlike that of Satre's novel Nausea, the 20th century's greatest expression of mental and emotional inaction, compromise and disgust."Burgin writes direct, unpretentious prose that often uses guilelessness and incidental awkwardness as a resonant device for honesty and insight. Ray's obfuscations and misconceived desires--after breaking Joy's heart a second time, for example, he still believes that they can reconcile--are no match for the plain-dealing narrative with which Burgin treats his character's dilemmas and delusions. After he and Joy have broken apart the second time, Ray thinks, in one of his rare candid, rather than self-pitying, moments, "The point was to live, to experience a bit of the world with someone you could be yourself with." That's a large order for someone who has no self, a fact that Burgin reveals with fearsome intensity."
Unirtay
Publishers Weekly review says: "[Burgin's] matter-of-fact prose captures the muted struggle and achromatic inner life of a man too hungry for success and naive about the costs. Burgin ("Fear of Blue Skies"} knows all the major players and the buzz words of the contemporary music field, and he is adept at designing the crisp, evocative stage on which his well-defined but strangely distant, glib characters make their motives crystal clear."
Fegelv
"[Burgin's] matter of fact prose captures the muted struggle and achromatic inner life of a man too hungry for success and naive about the costs. Burgin (Fear of Blue Skies) knows all the major players and the buzz words of the contemporary music field, and he is adept at designing the crisp, evocative stage on which his well-defined but strangely glib characters make their motives crystal clear."
Zavevidi
"I read Ghost Quartet in a whirlwind, for that's what the novel did to me. The book is fast and furious, interesting and bright, a go-ahead, well-plotted, strong, intense story...nothing Burgin's ever done, much as I've admired so much of his fiction in the past, ever had the intensity and complexity of this work." --Stephen Dixon
HelloBoB:D
Josip Novakovich says about this book: "Ghost Quartet" proceeds with a terrific narrative momentum from start to finish‹the novel reads as a classic. Mr. Burgin is one of the best and most thoughtful writers at work in the States."
...one of the most serious and morally ambitious contemporary novels that I've read in quite a while." ‹Keith Taylor
Ghost Quartet ebook
Author:
Richard Burgin
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1589 kb
FB2 size:
1666 kb
DJVU size:
1235 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Triquarterly (November 25, 1999)
Pages:
312 pages
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
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