liceoartisticolisippo-ta

Terror of Living ebook

by Urban Waite


The Terror of Living gives us horses and guns; rugged loners saved from themselves by loyal wives; and a folksy Big Theme, essentially "good people sometimes do bad things"

The Terror of Living gives us horses and guns; rugged loners saved from themselves by loyal wives; and a folksy Big Theme, essentially "good people sometimes do bad things". In case you miss it en route, a character spells it out at the end: "The way I see it, you're both good people, it's just bad things that happen. ) It also gives us a taut cat-and-mouse plot the set-up of which owes enough to McCarthy's No Country for Old Men for the whole thing to play as homage, if that's how you want it to play. And yet The Terror of Living doesn't quite gel. It's trapped between genres in a way that feels craven and emollient rather than inspired and energising.

The Terror of Living book. In the acknowledgements Urban Waite listed the books and writers that influenced his need to be a writer. Phil Hunt is deep in trouble  . Poachers by Tom Franklin, Spartina by John Casey, Dog Soldiers by Robert Stone, No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy, and The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene. I really appreciate it when writers do this, especially when they list more than just the authors, but the actually titles of the books as well. The result, I went to my library and pulled a copy of Dog Soldiers off my shelf to read next.

That The Terror of Living is author Urban Waite’s first novel is quite an accomplishment, especially considering it is deservedly drawing comparisons to No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy; not too bad for your first rodeo. With a tour de force debut like this, it’s scary to think what Waite will serve up next. I, for one, will be eagerly awaiting. Urban Waite was born and grew up in Seattle. He has received degrees in writing from University of Washington, Western Washington University, and Emerson.

The Terror of Living. Authors: Urban Waite. Claim the "The Terror of Living.

In this modern western thriller, drug trafficking replaces the old Wild-West gunslinger and cattle-rustling themes, with an ex-convict drugs-runner pursued by the lawmen and a psychopathic hit-man

In this modern western thriller, drug trafficking replaces the old Wild-West gunslinger and cattle-rustling themes, with an ex-convict drugs-runner pursued by the lawmen and a psychopathic hit-man. A minute passed and then another. The smoke alarm sounded, the smell of something burning. Nora heard footsteps go past. Something hit the floor hard outside her door, shaking the wooden boards. She heard a man's voice call out, and then nothing else. Nora didn't dare to move.

In Urban Waite's debut novel, The Terror of Living", three men-all on different sides of the law-find their lives tangled up like roots after a heroin delivery goes dead wrong

In Urban Waite's debut novel, The Terror of Living", three men-all on different sides of the law-find their lives tangled up like roots after a heroin delivery goes dead wrong. Deeo in the woods, with rifles blasting and knives flashing, with the gray faces of the mountains looking down at them, they seek revenge and salvation in one another. This is a book for and about men, one of the best of the year. - Esquire "Benjamin Percy ". About the Author. Urban Waite is thirty and lives in Seattle.

The Terror of Living - Urban Waite. First published in Great Britain by Simon & Schuster UK Ltd, 2011. They were standing in a thicket of low alder, the white bark shining around them and the green moss floating off the trees with the wind. No reproduction without permission. We’re too low, Hunt said, checking the altimeter on the GPS, then looking at his watch to make sure. He handed the GPS to the kid and began walking.

Phil Hunt is deep in trouble. For twenty years he's lived in Washington State, raising horses with his wife on his small farm and trying to stay clear of the law. But when a less-than-legal side job goes horribly wrong, Hunt is suddenly on the run from two men: Drake, the deputy sheriff who intends to incarcerate him, and Grady, the vicious hitman with a knife fetish who means to carve him limb from limb.

Such a book is The Terror Of Living and as the reader feels their pulse quicken almost from the first it is. .It is easy to forgive Urban Waite wearing his inspiration on his sleeve when the result is such a memorable debut as this. Simon & Schuster, £1. 9.

Such a book is The Terror Of Living and as the reader feels their pulse quicken almost from the first it is hard not to think that one is in the hands of a seasoned professional. The ingredients Waite stirs into his tensely orchestrated narrative are simple but classic: his protagonist, newly married deputy sheriff Drake, a small-time rancher and ex-convict Hunt and ruthless, cold-blooded killer Grady, who is pursuing both men and racking up a hefty body count en route.

Hunt, an ex-convict, has spent the past twenty years on a small ranch with his wife, supplementing his income with the odd drug smuggling job. Drake, a deputy sheriff, is newly married and has almost escaped the shadow of his father, who was also a sheriff -- and no stranger to the drug trade himself...Drake is on Hunt's trail when a big drug deal in the mountains goes awry and so begins a terrifying race against time. Although Hunt evades Drake's attempts at capture the traffickers soon unleash a merciless hired killer to reclaim what's theirs. As the chase closes in and loyalties are tested, Drake's quest for justice contends with a hitman's quest for blood, and Hunt must face a terrible choice...
EXIBUZYW
The crime novel seems to be one of the fictional genres with a tremendous amount of talent. Between successful authors like Michael Connelly, Robert Crais, Steve Hamilton and James Patterson, and the constant influx of new talent, there is always a book to get your mind and your heart racing. With his debut novel, The Terror of Living, Urban Waite is a welcome addition to the genre.

Phil Hunt and his wife lead a quiet life, raising horses in the Pacific Northwest. Having served time in prison for killing a man when he was younger, Phil mostly keeps to himself and tries to stay out of trouble, only taking an occasional job running drugs across the Canadian border when he needs to make ends meet. One night, a drug run goes horribly wrong, when he and an associate are apprehended by Bobby Drake, a young deputy sheriff whose father is in jail for drug running. Hunt escapes but loses the drugs, and finds himself in a great deal of trouble. He is ordered to make one last drug run, yet that, too, goes horribly awry, and he finds himself on the run from Grady, a vicious psychopath hired to kill him. Grady is being followed by two Vietnamese men who want the drugs they were promised, which spells more trouble for Hunt. And it turns out the only person Hunt may be able to count on is Bobby Drake, who has his own demons to fight as well.

This book, much like Galveston, which I read earlier this month, has some definite overtones similar to the film No Country for Old Men, especially where Grady's character is concerned. I really liked the characters in this book, even though Grady gave me the creeps. Waite is a writer with tremendous promise; while I had a feeling I knew what twists and turns the book would take, watching the story get to those places was very compelling. I felt the story dragged a bit at times, and I always get a little weary with books or movies that have a killer who is always magically able to be one step ahead of everyone else, but on the whole, this is a tremendously readable book. I think we'll be seeing Urban Waite's name again soon...
Mullador
In his first novel, Urban Waite is firmly on the shelf with Lee Child, Robert Crais and Elmore Leonard. This novel is a definite read in one sitting as, after a simple beginning, all hell breaks loose on several fronts.

Bobby Drake, a deputy sheriff in a small town northeast of Seattle, discovers a car parked beside a backwoods mountain road. Bobby, whose own father is doing time for drug smuggling, returns the following morning with a rifle and some camping gear and heads into the woods with no clear plan. Asleep in his tent that night, Bobby is awakened by the sound of an airplane flying low. He sees flares arcing upwards, followed by flares attached to bundles floating down and the chase is on.

Phil Hunt is fifty something. Coming out of prison in his early thirties after serving time for a gas station robberry gone wrong, he was broke, uneducated and unemployed. He marries Nora and they live on a small ranch where they board horses; however, for twenty years, he and a friend, Eddie, have supplemented their incomes by retrieving drugs thrown from planes using Phil's horses. For the first time, Phil is told to take a second man into the wilderness as the drop will require two horses. The man is really a kid and when Bobby Drake gives chase, the kid goes down but Phil Hunt makes it home.

Phil knows there will be hell to pay, but he has no idea how much hell. Back at the ranch, Eddie tells Phil that he will need to undertake a job retrieving heroin by boat as payback for losing the "product" from the plane. What Phil does not know is that several people would like to have the heroin in question and, if Phil and his boat are lost in the process, that would be even better.

The heroin is delivered in a most unexpected way by the most chilling psychopath since Hannibal Lector and Phil Hunt's situation goes from dangerous to deadly.

Bobby Drake can't let go, even when the DEA says, "We'll take it from here," and as he follows Hunt's trail, he begins to realize that, backed into a corner, inherently decent people may break the law but when the only way out would condemn another to death, they will not cross the line. And, hopefully, this won't be the end of the line for Bobby Drake. It is definitely only the beginning for Urban Waite.
Dilkree
In choosing a title with the weight of "The Terror of Living," Urban Waite is taking some risk. But the first-time author proves he's got the chops to pull it off, ripping a moody and thoughtful crime-noir gem of running drugs set in a refreshingly uncommon Pacific Northwest setting.

55-ish ex-con Phil Hunt raises horses with wife Nora, generating some extra cash smuggling heroin across the northern border. A much younger Hunt killed a clerk during a convenience store robbery-gone-bad, landing him in prison for a sentence much shorter lived than the burden of guilt he still carries. On the other side of the law, young deputy Bobby Drake still carries the shame of the legacy of his lawman father, who a decade earlier was busted for trafficking dope much in the same way as Hunt. Hunt and Drake's lives cross paths accidently when the deputy stumbles upon an exchange set the mayhem in motion, while adding to the bloody drama is a sadistically talented hired assassin. From the Washington state mountain ranges to a shadowy Vietnamese gang, "The Terror of Living" reels in a series of harrowing events that ultimately reshape the course of both men's lives.

While shades of Cormac McCarthy's blistering "No Country For Old Men" may sneak through plot points, Waite's approach, if not as desperate and craftily written as McCarthy, is an original combination of thrills, suspense, psycho-drama and brutality. Keen character development and multiple menaces set this one above the crowd, and if Urban Waites takes a bit too much off of McCarthy's jagged edges, a steady pace and satisfying climax will keep you flipping the pages and when you're finished, looking forward to Waite's next installment.
Terror of Living ebook
Author:
Urban Waite
Category:
Action & Adventure
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1216 kb
FB2 size:
1923 kb
DJVU size:
1684 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster (February 1, 2011)
Pages:
320 pages
Rating:
4.8
Other formats:
rtf azw mbr txt
© 2018-2020 Copyrights
All rights reserved. liceoartisticolisippo-ta.it | Privacy Policy | DMCA | Contacts