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The Fungus ebook

by Harry Adam Knight


The Fungus by Harry Adam Knight. Originally published in Great Britain by Star in 1985. First published in the United States by Franklin Watts in 1989.

The Fungus by Harry Adam Knight. Published by Valancourt Books, Richmond, Virginia.

I had a damn good time with this book. Clive Barker First published in Great Britain in 1985 by Star Books First published in the United States in 1989 by Franklin Watts, Inc. Clive Barker First published in Great Britain in 1985 by Star Books First published in the United States in 1989 by Franklin Watts, In. Fung’/us (-ngg-), n. (p. i p. ji, -uses). Mushroom, toadstool, or allied plant including moulds; (Bo. cryptogamous plant without chlorophyll feeding on organic matter, things of sudden growth; (Path. spongy morbid growth or excrescence; skin disease of fish.

I recently read another book by this author, (two authors, really, using the pseudonym of Harry Adam Knight. Get it? HAK?), called SLIMER.

Author: Harry Knight. Publisher: Franklin Watts, London, 1989. What would happen if, through a genetic experiment gone awry, fungi-mushrooms, toadstools, molds and yeasts-were to go out of control and grow with unprecedented vigor and speed and tenacity, and in places formerly inimicable to them? A first-rate and vivid thriller. Part one. The Spreading.

By Harry Adam Knight. Author: Harry Adam Knight. When I was given this book I must admit I had my doubts. The front cover didn’t appeal, the title seemed rather dated and the type of book I was expecting seemed very much planted in the 80’s. Reading through the first few pages and I wasn’t disappointed. It was exactly as I feared.

The Fungus is a 191-page horror novel written by the duo known as Harry Adam Knight. Note: There is a small rape scene in this book

The Fungus is a 191-page horror novel written by the duo known as Harry Adam Knight. First published in 1985, it is being re-released by Valancourt Books. Note: There is a small rape scene in this book. However, the circumstances are so outlandish that I didn’t even get a twinge at it. Instead it just had me going Eww! Gross! and giggling because I was so disgusted. I doubt it’ll trigger anyone, but just a heads-up. The idea behind ‘The Fungus’ is one that I don’t think is ever going to get old.

Harry Adam Knight was a pseudonym used by Australian (resident in London) SF author and film critic John Brosnan, sometimes in collaboration with Leroy Kettle. THE FUNGUS is one of the HAK collaborations and the initials of the pseudonym give an indication of what Brosnan and Kettle thought of the work published under the name. Despite that, however, THE FUNGUS is typical of British disaster novels in which the institutions of the state are quickly overwhelmed by a swift change in the ecological balance.

2 people like this topic.

Book by Knight, Harry Adam
Burking
HAK does it again. John Brosnan (his real name) has a great, clean writing style that carries you along, and takes this from a pulp effort to a real book (his characters are real people, too). I had my doubts about fungus taking over London, but he does it pretty scientifically and name-checks about two dozen different fungi that victims and our heroes encouter. Plus, a London and its inhabitants covered in a soft, furry blanket is creepy as hell.
Arar
British SF writers are well known for their novels of disaster overtaking the island. To such works as John Wyndham's DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS, J.G. Ballard's THE DROWNED WORLD, and John Christopher's NO BLADE OF GRASS, we can now add Harry Adam Knight's THE FUNGUS, back in print thanks to the folks at Bruin Asylum.

Harry Adam Knight was a pseudonym used by Australian (resident in London) SF author and film critic John Brosnan, sometimes in collaboration with Leroy Kettle. THE FUNGUS is one of the HAK collaborations and the initials of the pseudonym give an indication of what Brosnan and Kettle thought of the work published under the name. Despite that, however, THE FUNGUS is typical of British disaster novels in which the institutions of the state are quickly overwhelmed by a swift change in the ecological balance. Since one of the authors was a senior civil servant we can assume that there is an understanding of the limits of government power and competence. THE FUNGUS wastes no time introducing the disastrous scenario; in part one of the novel we are treated to several different scenes of fungicidal mayhem as different species of mushroom run rampant either enveloping, attacking, or infiltrating unsuspecting human hosts. For some the result is like an especially bad case of athletes foot, covering the entire body with raw, bleeding, cracked, and pustulant flesh. And they are the lucky few!

Part 2 introduces a new set of characters based in Ireland. London has been overrun and abandoned and all of the mainland UK is quarantined. It's an expository section meant to introduce the characters, mostly an unpleasant bunch - a drunken sergeant, a whiny writer, and a mysterious, but beautiful, South African scientist. This trio is tasked with getting through section 3 - visiting mainland Britain, tracking down the source of the fungal infection, and sending any acquired knowledge back to the military in Ireland. It is generally acknowledged to be a suicide mission.

Part 3 details the journey into and across mainland Britain. One can't help but think of Hell Tanner's journey in Roger Zelazny's DAMNATION ALLEY. Or perhaps Marlow's journey up the Congo into THE HEART OF DARKNESS. A different author, writing a different book, might have spent inordinate amounts of time detailing the rapidly expanding breakdown of society as paranoia and the fungal infection inexorably expand. A Ballard may have focused intensely on the psychedelic aspects of London encased in fungal growths, or the nascent tribal communities being formed by those who were infected by a symbiotic form of fungus, but Knight recognizes that we, his readers, see these as obstacles to be overcome, preferably violently and gorily. He certainly delivers.

Overall I enjoyed THE FUNGUS quite a lot. It's a fast read, perfect for a long plane or train journey, or for a lazy spring or summer weekend. If no new ground is broken in the classic British disaster SF novel ouevre, THE FUNGUS at least fits well within it. It would probably make a good movie. There are definitely worse ways to spend your time than enjoying this novel.
Mavivasa
Gruesome fun I could so easily see this as an 80s horror film. Too bad they never mad a film of it.
Marirne
A book I never thought would see reprinting gets an A+ effort from new publisher BRUIN ASYLUM. Nice production values, bonus introduction by Roy Kettle, photos of Roy with John Brosnan and loads of bonus HAK Letters after the conclusion of the novel. Nice oversized softback format with original cover art looks great on the shelf. Let's hope that BRUIN revisit the "SIC HAK" library again soon!
Gaiauaco
This is a very strange book. It doesn't explain how the situation happened nor is the ending satisfactory.
Qusserel
Jane Wilson is a mycologist (study of fungus) who is trying to solve world hunger by developing an oversized, protein rich mushroom. Unfortunately for the rest of London, they find out what messing with nature can do.
There are over 100,000 varieties of fungus know to man, and thanks to Jane, they are all spreading out of control. Brilliant colors of soft molds are covering almost everything. Nothing is safe, buildings, paper, electronics, animals, and humans.
Jane's husband is "volunteered" by the British military to find is wife's notes, so they can find a cure. Barry Wilson, is a former mycologist himself, and currently writes detective novels. He is coupled with Terenced Slocock, a crazed military Sergeant, and Kimberly Fairchild, a tropical mycologist. These three people are the last chance Britain has, before the world makes good on their threat of a "nuclear" fix to the problem.
This book is a very entertaining read. I find it quite unfortunate that it is out of print. If you can find a used copy someplace, it is worth the few bucks to add it to your collection. It was also previously release as a paperback call "Death Spore".
Rrinel
I got this paperback a few years ago in Poland, where I browse used books, and where I discovered a ton of great horror writers, and my favorite of them all; Graham Masterton.

Fungus is a fast read. Reading it made me appreciate the clean and safety of my New York City apartment, despite of terrorist threats, cockroaches and my cats yakking up surprises here and there.

Basic synopsis; some lab experiments that make simple fungi reproduce and grow on a massive rate and take over London.

The color, texture, array and lightning speed of contamination of the super strong fungi is too much for people living there, and they are either killed (as when they contract it form air, food or water) depending on the kind of fungus they got, it will either blow up from their stomach or mutate them into a walking mushroom, and make them loose all sense of humanity sooner or later.

It's all up to a bitter writer, whose ex wife was the scientist screwing it all up, and a team of other scientists to save what's left of their country before it's blown to bits by the govt.

Great read really, if you can get your hands on. Despite it all being about science and fungus, it didn't have one boring moment. Kinda reminds me of a Zombie movie here and there, even tho it's a book, because the mutated people were going crazy and hunting those who haven't changed. I had a marvelous time reading it.
The Fungus ebook
Author:
Harry Adam Knight
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1884 kb
FB2 size:
1824 kb
DJVU size:
1545 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Franklin Watts (April 1, 1989)
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
mbr lit lrf txt
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