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The Season of Lillian Dawes: A Novel ebook

by Katherine Mosby


Mosby beautifully traces the trajectory of consequence that will change all three lives Katherine Mosby falls into this category in my book.

Mosby beautifully traces the trajectory of consequence that will change all three lives. The Season of Lillian Dawes is a wondrous novel that chronicles a young man's first tour of the adult world. Katherine Mosby falls into this category in my book. Her Season of Lillian Dawes is a perfect example of my idea of a jewel of a book.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Mosby beautifully traces the trajectory of consequence that will change all three lives. The Season of Lillian Dawes is a wondrous novel that chronicles a young man's first tour of the adult world

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In the wake of some adolescent antics at his private school, Gabriel Gibbs, a member of an extended aristocratic family in a privileged segment of society in post-World War II New York, is expelled

Katherine Mosby does both in this novel, which for me was laugh out loud funny several times, as well as. .Lillian Dawes - enchanting as a summer day in Central Park. Published by Thriftbooks.

Katherine Mosby does both in this novel, which for me was laugh out loud funny several times, as well as touching, haunting, and thought provoking. It is filled with eccentric characters who populate a deliciously rich evocation of New York in 1954. com User, 17 years ago. This book might be best savored under a large tree with a wicker hamper from Dean and Deluca and a split of Dom Perignon champagne(attractive companion optional). To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

amp; International Retailers. The Season of Lillian Dawes.

Katherine Mosby's previous works include a collection of poetry, The Book of Uncommon Prayer, and two novels, Private Altars and The Season of Lillian Dawes, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She lives in New York City and teaches at New York University's Stern Business School.

Manhattan in the 1950s.

The Season of Lillian Dawes Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Published April 1, 2003 by Harper Perennial. Manhattan in the 1950s. Expelled from boarding school, Gabriel Gibbs joins his older brother Spencer's world of white-gloved Park Avenue, weekend house parties filled with tennis and cocktails, and literary Greenwich Village - where Gabriel first glimpses the elusive Lillian Dawes, who will also captivate his brother. As their lives entwine, so begins the powerful and poignant unraveling of innocence.

When the beautiful, mysterious Lillian Dawes shows up in New York, she .

When the beautiful, mysterious Lillian Dawes shows up in New York, she seems to be everywhere at once, radiating charm and instantly captivating two orphaned brothers, Gabriel and Spencer. Their infatuation takes them down the dark roads of Lillian's past and changes their lives irrevocably. From the acclaimed writer of Private Altars, comes a story of driving lyrical force set in Manhattan in the 1950s. When he is expelled from boarding school, Gabriel Gibbs is sent to live with his older brother Spencer in New York. Rather than a punishm. I love how Mosby captures New York society in the 50's.

Then she mentions F. Scott Fitzgerald, who ''wrote superbly on the subject, but with the yearning avidity of the outsider.

From the acclaimed writer of Private Altars, comes a story of driving lyrical force set in Manhattan in the 1950s. When he is expelled from boarding school, Gabriel Gibbs is sent to live with his older brother Spencer in New York. Rather than a punishment, this becomes an exhilarating invitation to a dazzling world, from smoking cigars at the Plaza Hotel to weekend house parties filled with tennis and cocktails. It is in this heady atmosphere -- from white-gloved Park Avenue to literary Greenwich Village -- that Gabriel first glimpses the elusive Lillian Dawes. Free-spirited and mysterious, Lillian captures the imaginations of those in "all the best circles," including both brothers. As their lives entwine, so begins the powerful and poignant unraveling of innocence.

Thetalas
I kept reading this book thinking it may get better but it never did. I initially became interested because I read on a blog that the language was similar to Fitzgerald, but nothing could be further. "The Great Gatsby" uses lyrical language that is very well selected; this is much longer and over uses adjectives. You should not use so many adjectives and similes that tell me absolutely nothing. It's indulgent writing and it's sloppy. The story also had a "Breakfast at Tiffany's" feel but with a character that lacks motivation. Lillian isn't even in a good chunk of the book. A quote from this book that sums it up, "I was just waiting; as if on a journey with no particular destination, there was no anticipated event which would signal arrival." Indeed, this book just putters out.
Jugami
A witty and engaging first-person narrative of New York in 1954. In addition to the brilliant and mysterious Lillian Dawes, whose first noncameo appearance doesn't occur until a third of the book is behind you, you'll meet the brothers Gabriel and Spencer Gibbs, who are temporarily rooming together (for reasons explained in the opening chapter), and their delightful aunt Lavinia, who brings her own silverware, and her dog, to restaurants.
The story is written in the first person, by Gabriel at some point in his future, and it joins the ever-growing list of "New York" novels, and quite near the top, too. Comparisons with "Catcher in the Rye" as well as Henry James and Edith Wharton are inevitable. There's also more than a touch of "Breakfast at Tiffanys."
New Yorkers with long memories, or their children and grandchildren, will delight in the references to the politics of the time (Joe McCarthy, the Rosenbergs, President Eisenhower) as well as to artifacts of the "Populuxe" era--transistor radios, hula hoops--and long-gone New York eating places, like Schraffts.
Tidily done.
Syleazahad
I can't remember the last time I had so much fun reading a novel that purports to be a comedy of manners but is also a heartwarming look at the eccentricities found in families and of the ties that bond those families together - in spite of themselves. Filled with humor and warmth, this one is an absolute stand-out, not to be missed.
At the heart of this book is Gabriel Gibbs, a young boy struggling to find himself after being thrown out of an upscale boarding school. Luckily he has his wise, if unconventional, brother Spencer to look after him as well as a muse in the form of the mysterious Lillian Dawes, a woman who is both more and less than she seems. She touches the heart of both Gabriel and his brother, leading them towards an unpredictable conclusion.
Funky
One of the few books I didnt complete. To descriptive for my taste of reading...
skriper
I came across this book by accident, on a shelf of books at my gym that are there for "borrowing" (or keeping) for whoever wants them. I was amazed how really *good* this find turned out to be!
The main character/first-person narrator is Gabriel, a teenaged boy who is kicked out of boarding school for smoking in the chapel and then gets to live in New York City with his older brother. Gabriel is a kind of Holden Caulfield with more class and less angst. He gets private tutoring to make up for his schooling, but has a lot of free time to scoot around in 1950s New York and do as he pleases. The common literary device of Dead Parents is employed to increase Gabriel's (and his brother's) freedom. The brother, Spencer, is a sort of lazy/brilliant/literary type, but not TOO dissipated.
Lillian Dawes enters the tale as an enigmatic figure, graceful, pretty, intelligent, knowledgeable, yet somehow marginal to society, especially the higher aspects of society as experienced by Gabe and Spence. I liked Lillian the best when she wore a pale green dress and identified trees by the sound of their leaves at a big party - her image was so compelling that now I want something to wear in pale green!
To explain what happens further with Lillian would be to write a spoiler....so I'll just say that wealthy aunts, 1950s New York society, and the nouveau riche all decorate the tale in winning ways. The author's ability to evoke 1950s New York is remarkable -- there were echoes of pre-war styles and manners of the 20s and 30s, which had not yet been wiped out by the social tsunamis of the 1960s.
Why not five stars? For one thing, the voice of the male narrator did not seem 100% believable to me. He was just a little too nice, too sensitive, to really be a guy. Also, some of the plot strategies near the end of the novel were a little English-novel-cliche to my taste.
But overall, I truly enjoyed this quick read, with its tremendous flavor of style, and think it should have become more famous than it apparently did.
The Season of Lillian Dawes: A Novel ebook
Author:
Katherine Mosby
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1823 kb
FB2 size:
1543 kb
DJVU size:
1897 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Harper Perennial; 1 Reprint edition (April 1, 2003)
Pages:
288 pages
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
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