liceoartisticolisippo-ta

Good Faith ebook

by Jane Smiley


Alfred a. knopf new york.

Alfred a. The surprise was that Bobby was at the office, in a jacket and a tie, and he had the Multiple Listing book out of his desk, wide open to the listings in the high one-hundreds. In those days, that was the back of the book and there were some nice houses there, houses up in Rollins Hills with five and six bedrooms and Sub-Zero refrigerators. I remember I showed a house up there with its own little sauna/steam room.

Good Faith has some wonderfully funny characters and is wise and touching. Mail on Sunday'Wonderful. With the skill, wit and wisdom that were in evidence in her previous bestsellers Moo and A Thousand Acres, Smiley brings us an absorbing tale about the perils of pursuing your dream. Red Magazine (Must-Read of the Month)'Only a writer of consummate craftsmanship and scope could write a novel about a series of real estate deals in a small town an hour and a half from New York City and make it so fully satisfying as to be thrilling

This book was so surprisingly entertaining, I feel like Jane Smiley can make any topic sing. I like how the roots of gentrification and Mcmansions are explored in a funny, rather than dark, way.

This book was so surprisingly entertaining, I feel like Jane Smiley can make any topic sing. It makes the 80s feel very long ago indeed.

In Good Faith, Jane Smiley explores the foundations of America - its real estate. Victoria M. Ford says: My only complaint is that the book rushed itself to a conclusion. Good Faith by Jane Smiley.

One time before, a branch had fallen behind the condo unit, where there were some large trees, and severed the line. I had fixed it myself. But out behind the condos, everything was fine. But out behind the condos, everything was fine n my neighbors’ door. The wife answered and I asked her if her phone was working. Oh, yes, I was just talking to my daughter. Are some of the phones out?. They were here turning it off for nonpayment. She looked carefully nonjudgmental. They were right out there.

In what sense is Jane Smiley interested in exposing certain truths about small-town, middle-class America? What points does Good Faith raise about how ordinary people respond when they seem to see a chance to increase their wealth and raise their social status? What social concerns.

In what sense is Jane Smiley interested in exposing certain truths about small-town, middle-class America? What points does Good Faith raise about how ordinary people respond when they seem to see a chance to increase their wealth and raise their social status? What social concerns might have motivated Smiley to take on a novel about the 1980s? How is the present social climate different, and how is it similar, to those greedy years? Is Joe a man who is looking for others to tell him what to do?

Jane Smiley is the author of numerous novels, including A Thousand Acres, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize . Q: In reading GOOD FAITH, one can’t help but think about the recent events in Corporate America, Enron specifically

Jane Smiley is the author of numerous novels, including A Thousand Acres, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, and most recently, Golden Age, the concluding volume of The Last Hundred Years trilogy. Q: In reading GOOD FAITH, one can’t help but think about the recent events in Corporate America, Enron specifically. Was that on your mind as you wrote this novel? A: I was almost finished with the novel when the Enron story broke, but as early as the California energy crisis of 2001, I was sure that there was some double dealing going on.

Jane Smiley brings her extraordinary gifts-comic timing, empathy . I have had this book in a drawer for 10 years and finally picked it up.

Jane Smiley brings her extraordinary gifts-comic timing, empathy, emotional wisdom, an ability to deliver slyly on big themes and capture the American spirit-to the seductive, wishful, wistful world of real estate, in which the sport of choice is the mind game. Her funny and moving new novel is about what happens when the American Dream morphs into a seven-figure American Fantasy. Joe Stratford is someone you like at once. Good Faith captures the seductions and illusions that can seize America during our periodic golden ages (every Main Street an ElDorado).

Jane Smiley (born September 26, 1949) is an American novelist. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1992 for her novel A Thousand Acres (1991)

Jane Smiley (born September 26, 1949) is an American novelist. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1992 for her novel A Thousand Acres (1991). Born in Los Angeles, California, Smiley grew up in Webster Groves, Missouri, a suburb of St. Louis, and graduated from Community School and from John Burroughs School. She obtained a BA in literature at Vassar College (1971), then earned an MA (1975), MFA (1976), and PhD (1978) from the University of Iowa.

Gavinranadar
Good character development and interesting story, all-in-all, but I found the author’s writing style often made it difficult to decipher the intended message. I can’t “put my finger” on it, exactly. I just know that I often felt uncertain about what she was trying to convey.
Eayaroler
First I am a HUGE Jane Smiley fan. I loved Moo, Horse Heaven, a Day at the Races and even her kid's books. But this was just tiresome to get through from beginning to end. At around the 15% mark I honestly thought I should be halfway through.

The characters are all well written and believable without being stereotypes, and certain passages were captivating, but by and large the storyline just prodded along. Nothing of interest happened. I suppose that's indicative of real life, but it's not why I read fiction. I need a bit more action.
The ending definitely felt rushed, but much of her writing is like that. Still, a little more payoff at the end would be appreciated.

I'm sad to say I would not recommend this book, even to Smiley fans.
ladushka
I thoroughly enjoyed how the plot developed. The characters were well portrayed and the protagonist a likeable fellow who, as the reader, you really don't want anything bad to happen to - but it seems as if a train-wreck might be looming. Good suspense. Again Jane Smiley dragged me into her world and held me there, making me want to return every time I had to put the book down.
SmEsH
I finish 99 percent of the books I read if only out of vanity. This one I didn't even skim to the end to see if it got better. The excerpt I read on Amazon was promising enough for me to buy the book. I am also a Smiley fan and have read and enjoyed most of her books. And I don't mind reading a novel about real estate in the 80's, although I was quite young then. I would read a book by Smiley about filing tax returns, at least I would give it a decent chance before puttting it aside.
This book was just - dull. It made no impression on me, except that I could think of half a dozen things I'd rather be doing. I didn't even care enough to hate it or get angry that it had wasted my time.
The three stars are because Smiley on a bad day still writes better than most writers on a good day. It's well-written just not interesting.
Dont_Wory
Good enough to hold your interest, well defined characters.
Xarcondre
Jane Smiley's Good Faith is an almost-perfect replica of a Richard Russo novel, with its characters on a slightly higher rung of the financial ladder than Russo's. This is to say that Russo writes about basically working class and ne'er-do-well folks in small towns in upstate New York. They are exasperating, but, ultimately (sentimentally) really and heart-warmingly good. There's no plot, no structure; the thing goes on and on until Russo (for whatever reason) is ready to stop.

So, too, with this novel of Smiley's. Small town nowheresville; a first person narrator who is "cute," but not particularly interesting or intelligent, a cast of many characters, some of them rendered nicely, some of them not much of anything. The prose, like Russo's, is altogether competent but absolutely nothing more than that. (Russo has a sharp image every now and again; not Smiley in this book.) There's no plot; the structure is straight ahead, not even a flashback. It goes on and on (I got through by skipping many many paragraphs), and comes to a stop after events that one might or might not have predicted. O.k., what should we read next? This fills the time pleasantly enough at a slightly higher level than tv soaps, but after reading it I suspect I won't want to see what Smiley did with King Lear in A Thousand Acres. Ho hum.....
ARE
Jane Smiley takes her readers to the other side of the country from where she lives, the countryside not far north from New York City, a beautiful part of the state. She writes about the Real Estate business and knows much about how this business works.

The story is told by Joe Stratford, a man divorced for about two years, no children. He is having an affair with his boss's daughter, a married woman with two teen age boys. Joe is working with his boss's son, a few years younger than Joe, goofy acting like a teenager though he is close to thirty. Joe is like a son to this family, parents a nice couple, Gordon and Betty whom Joe seems to love more than his own parents. Gordon is foolish with his money and possessions, but a good businessman. The couple's daughter, Sally, was Joe's high school sweetheart and was killed in an automobile accident when she was in college. Joe's parents, he is an only child, are overly religious, much praying, much church going, entertaining missionaries, not much fun.

My favorite characters are the two Davids, gay men who bought a house from Joe and fixed it up beautifully. These two had a sense of style, good entertainers, great house, fun.

The book takes readers back to the 1980s.

Joe meets Marcus Burns, a con man, a former IRS agent. Marcus is quick talking, smart, not to be trusted, a person lacking a sense of honesty and morality. Joe gets to know this man and is pulled into his schemes. Marcus will do anything to make a buck. he is trying to make those around him into little mini mes. He criticizes Bobby for acting so young and silly. He advises everyone, noone gets angry at him but listens to his advice.

Readers find out much about real estate laws, town council meetings, building codes, ways of buying, building, selling, plus those who make their living by working in real estate. There is much wheeling and dealing in this book, too much dishonest lying, cheating, stealing. Marcus's sister, Jane, but is she really his sister gets involved, conspirators. She has moved into his office to help him. She has moved from the midwest.

Too many characters are taken in by Marcus, but others see him as the person he really is. One character, Bobby's girlfriend, Fern says Bobby should have left him at the bar where he found him.

Marcus and Joe are business partners. They are playing the stock market which is tricky and dangerous.

Jane Smiley is a good writer. The book is over 400 pages. I thought I wasn't going to like it but found out how I enjoyed reading about what goes on in the Real Estate Market plus much other information. I enjoyed reading about all the different characters that passes through Joe's life. Mrs Smiley is a good author. She gets right into people's heads. The bubble burst, people are too greedy, wanting to get rich quick. Old adages "if it seems too good, it probably isn't" A fool and his money are soon parted." Everything goes back to what it aways in this area but characters are poorer, but some did well. They were all played for fools. However, some characters say that Marcus wasn't the bad one, it really was Jane. But who really knows.
Good Faith ebook
Author:
Jane Smiley
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1326 kb
FB2 size:
1297 kb
DJVU size:
1397 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Anchor / Random House; First Edition edition (2003)
Pages:
432 pages
Rating:
4.4
Other formats:
docx doc mbr lrf
© 2018-2020 Copyrights
All rights reserved. liceoartisticolisippo-ta.it | Privacy Policy | DMCA | Contacts