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Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries ebook

by Bharti Kirchner


Bharti Kirchner is an Indian American author. Bharti Kirchner is the author of ten books-six novels and four cookbooks-and has been publishing since 1992.

Bharti Kirchner is an Indian American author. She has written numerous articles and essays on food, travel, fitness, and lifestyle. She has won two Seattle Arts Commission literature grants, and an Artist Trust GAP grant.

Bharti Kirchner is the author of eleven books-seven critically acclaimed novels and four cookbooks and hundreds of short .

Bharti Kirchner is the author of eleven books-seven critically acclaimed novels and four cookbooks and hundreds of short pieces for magazines and newspapers. A recent novel, Goddess of Fire, was shortlisted for the Nancy Pearl Award. Her earlier novels include Tulip Season, Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries, Darjeeling, Sharmila’s Book, and Shiva Dancing. Bharti has written for Food Bharti Kirchner is the author of eleven books-seven critically acclaimed novels and four cookbooks and hundreds of short pieces for magazines and newspapers.

Bharti Kirchner is the prolific author of eleven books - seven novels and four cookbooks. Her sixth, a literary historical novel Goddess of Fire was short-listed for the Nancy Pearl Award. Her fourth novel Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries (St. Martin's Press) was selected for the Summer Washington Reads program. Darjeeling (St. Martin's Press), a third novel, received endorsements from top national authors

Sunya owns Pastries, a bakery in Seattle where she creates delicious works of art. Her world crumbles when a chain bakery threatens to open near her, her boyfriend leaves her, and her mother gets engaged to a horrible man. All of this pales in comparison to the fact that she has lost her touch for baking.

That may be the reason why the title of Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries caught my attention.

I always cherished coffee, desserts or any other snacks with a good book. That may be the reason why the title of Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries caught my attention. Posts About Bharti Kirchner. lt;p

Bharti Kirchner is the author of eight books-five novels and four cookbooks-and has been publishing since 1992. Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries (2003). Prior to becoming a writer, Kirchner worked as a systems engineer for IBM and as a systems manager for Bank of America, San Francisco.

A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries. Novelist (Darjeeling, 2002, et. and cookbook author Kirchner whisks up a tale of escalating crises-in love, work, family, and career-all serendipitously resolved by spiritual baking lessons. In a story with as many plotlines as a millefeuille has pastry leaves, narrator Sunya Malhotra begins her tale of woe as her life and work seem about to implode.

Bharti Kirchner is the author of nine books-five . Her fifth novel (a mystery this time), Tulip Season: A Mitra Basu Mystery is due out in 2012.

Bharti Kirchner is the author of nine books-five critically acclaimed novels and four cookbooks and hundreds of short pieces for magazines and newspapers. Her earlier novels include Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries, Darjeeling, Sharmila’s Book, and Shiva Dancing. Bharti has written for Food & Wine, Vegetarian Times, Writer’s Digest, The Writer, Fitness Plus, Northwest Travel, and The Seattle Times

com Product Description (ISBN 0312330960, Paperback).

com Product Description (ISBN 0312330960, Paperback). Sunya, a young, Indian woman, is the head baker and owner of Pastries, a warm and comfortable bakery in Seattle. When a new baker at Pastries tells Sunya about a baking school in Japan that helps people with their baking skills and helps them to center themselves spiritually through a form of Buddism, Sunya feels that this just might be the answer to her problems.

Sunya, a young, Indian woman, is the head baker and owner of Pastries, a warm and comfortable bakery in Seattle. Sunya loves baking and has transformed her fabulous cakes and tarts into delicious works of art. The success of her beloved bakery is put in jeopardy, however, when a chain bakery threatens to open up down the street from her. To add to her misery, Roger, her hip, Japanese boyfriend, has left her for a "perfect" Japanese girlfriend and her mother has just become engaged to a man Sunya detests. All of this misery pales in signigicance next to her main worry - she has lost her touch for baking.When a new baker at Pastries tells Sunya about a baking school in Japan that helps people with their baking skills and helps them to center themselves spiritually through a form of Buddism, Sunya feels that this just might be the answer to her problems.
Goodman
Forget about the descriptions of pastries in this book! What about the sumptuous, unforgettable descriptions about the tempting cheesecake slices that keep finding their way in the pages of this food novel? I could almost see the ripe slices of mango, the delicate texture of the crumb crust, and the wickedly caloric and irresistable cheesecake core. Ay, I am sure anyone who is on any kind of calorie-restrictive diet will really feel their willpower being challenged if they are able to get through this book without succumbing to cravings for pies, cookies, lemon bars and other assorted concoctions that the main character talks about in rich detail, omitting nothing.

This is the third of Bharti Kirchner's novels that I have read. I really admire her for the way she develops her characters through their both endearing and annoying personal habits, as well as the generous descriptions of their tastes in clothing, cologne and food. We really get a sense of the individuals described, and by the time I finished reading the book I felt as though I had known some of the main people personally and had even shared a slice of cheesecake with them!

Sunya, the main character, is a forlorn, embitterred, Indian-American whose bitterness is quite heavy for a woman of only twenty-nine years. She never knew her father, who abandoned her and her mother. Her parents both immigrated from India, a product of an arranged marriage back home, and her father, a chemistry professor, found work in Seattle at the University of Washington. Sunya's inspiration for cooking came from her mother. As a young woman, her mother, Dee, managed to pay the bills and maintain their family household income through her ownership and management of a small "mom and pop" donut shop. She combined the familiarity and accessiblity of an American staple (the donut) and infused it with her own Indian sensiblities (exotic flavors like lime) to make it authentically her own. Sunya's gift as baker has been clouded by her sadness over a broken relationship and unresolved issues around her father and her lifelong feeling of rejection.

Bharti's telling of this story of self discovery, forgiveness, resilience and pastries (hence, the title) is beautifully told through the eyes of a young woman whose story isn't restrictive exclusively to her culture or gender, for that matter. There are many people out there whose parents have rejected family life to seek out their own path, while leaving child and remaining parent behind in the dust. I, too, am one of those people. Ms. Kirchner's story was both touching and hopeful.
Zainn
I bought this book right before a vacation because 1) I have always enjoyed reading Indian writers because I enjoy the culture and the way the stories unfold and 2) I love baking. This was such a disappointment. The story draaaaagged on and on and is entirely based on the main conflict of a "Bakery War?" Come ON. I mean we are expected to believe that in a culinary scene described to be as hot as Seattle's that the food columnist devotes every other column to Pastries Cafe?
Meanwhile poor Sunya seems destined to watch her business go under as she has reached a "baker's block" and can't do anything right in the kitchen. So she relies on her other bakers to make things to fill up the pastry case while unable to bake the Sunya cake (which only she can bake) which is what made her bakery famous. What business owner runs their business like this?
The food descriptions could have been so much more. It was readily obvious that the author's knowledge of a pastry chef's craft was limited.
The most painful thing about this book though was the writing itself and the numerous typos. It's hard to describe, but the tone seemed so simple and juvenile, so much so that it became distracting. And the ending is just ridiculous, and the explanations surrounding the cause of these final events even moreso.
Please don't waste your time. I have never had to stop reading a book so many times to consider whether I should just throw it out. Which I did when I finished it.
Najinn
Pastries is a masterful and lyrical chronicle of the life of a young baker, with a heartfelt last chapter. I like the observations and the humor and bits about Japan and wonder if the author was ever a baker herself. It is a turning point for an author who has written other engaging novels centered on India. Her work is stronger and more moving here.
Diredefender
I liked the book. It's so subtle some readers might miss the meanings. The author makes keen observations and her characters are flawed but realistic. The bakery, if it really exists will be nice to visit.
Cordann
I picked up this book because I like novels that have a food base to them. I especially love baked goods (who doesn't?) so Pastries seemed to fit the bill.

What a groaner this has turned out to be. The characters are flat, the dialogue is painfully unbelievable (from the French assistant who inserts a "oui" or a "bon jour" with every third line he utters to the movie director who describes his movie to Sunya over dinner like he's reading from a 13-year-old girl's journal of prose) and the plot twists are just plain silly. (For example, over dinner Sunya is stunned when her date rhapsodizes about a hole-in-the-wall doughnut shop with silk curtains he frequented as a boy. Guess what -- it's the shop Sunya's mom opened when Sunya was a girl.)

Then, as other reviewers have mentioned, the Bakery Wars?! For someone who really isn't doing much to save her business, Sunya sure get s a lot of ink in the city's major newspaper. And when I hit the part with the newspaper columnist making note of a man loitering outside Sunya's bakery I said aloud, "Come on."

All WTO references, and those involved and inspired by them, feel forced and unsupported.

Kirchner seems to create dialogue, characters and situations just to fill in the unexplainable gaps in the overall plot.

I keep picking up the book and giving it another chapter hoping it gets better, but it has become almost laughable (Perhaps I would laugh about it if I hadn't paid for it).

I gave it two stars because there are some wonderful descriptions of complicated pastries along the way.
Pastries: A Novel of Desserts and Discoveries ebook
Author:
Bharti Kirchner
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1712 kb
FB2 size:
1926 kb
DJVU size:
1273 kb
Language:
Publisher:
St. Martin's Griffin (August 1, 2004)
Pages:
368 pages
Rating:
4.2
Other formats:
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