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JPod: Special Edition ebook

by Douglas Coupland


a novel by. Douglas Coupland.

a novel by. For information address Bloomsbury USA, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. Published by Bloomsbury USA, New York.

Douglas Coupland OC OBC (born 1961) is a Canadian novelist and artist. His fiction is complemented by recognized works in design and visual art arising from his early formal training. His first novel, the 1991 international bestseller Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, popularized terms such as McJob and Generation X. He has published thirteen novels, two collections of short stories, seven non-fiction books, and a number of dramatic works and screenplays for film and television.

Zeitgeist surfer Douglas Coupland downloads his brain into JPod. Coupland does insert himself as a character in the book, which I was worried about because it sounded unwarranted and pretentious. However, he played it out well, and only once did it feel forced. I saw a Coupland reading not too long ago in Austin, and he described his character in the book as an "evil, slick, James Bond version of himself". This characterization is pretty accurate and is why this portion works out the way it does. Coupland inserts many examples of "text art" in the book. On one page there is nothing but the words "ramen noodles" over and over.

JPod, Douglas Coupland's most acclaimed novel to date, is a lethal joyride into today's new breed of tech worker. Ethan Jarlewski and five co-workers whose surnames begin with "J" are bureaucratically marooned in jPod, a no-escape architectural limbo on the fringes of a massive Vancouver game design company. The jPodders wage daily battle against the demands of a JPod, Douglas Coupland's most acclaimed novel to date, is a lethal joyride into today's new breed of tech worker.

Find douglas coupland from a vast selection of Books. JPod Coupland, Douglas Paperback. see allSpecial Attributes.

JPod is a -escape architectural limbo on the fringes of a massive Vancouver game design company. The six workers daily confront the forces that define our era: global piracy, boneheaded marketing staff, people smuggling, the rise of China, marijuana grow-ops, Jeff Probst, and the ashes of the 1990s financial tech dream. JPod's universe is amoral and shameless. The characters are products of their era even as they're creating it. Everybody in Ethan's life inhabits a moral grey zone.

Mint in unopened publishers slipcase (evenly faded to spine). Signed by Douglas Coupland with Jpod figure. Ethan Jarlewski and five co-workers whose surnames end in 'J' are bureaucratically marooned in JPod. JPod is a no-escape architectural limbo on the fringes of a massive Vancouver game design company.

Jpod is a sleek and necessary device: the finely tuned output of an author whose obsolescence is thankfully years away. Bored and zany computer programmers think of themselves as characters in a Douglas Coupland novel

Jpod is a sleek and necessary device: the finely tuned output of an author whose obsolescence is thankfully years away. Bored and zany computer programmers think of themselves as characters in a Douglas Coupland novel. The young video-game designers portrayed here resemble the nerds in Microserfs (1995), and their spokesman-narrator has relatives who recall the eccentrics in All Families Are Psychotic (2001).

All about JPod by Douglas Coupland.

24 iconic children's books you should still read, even if you're a grown up - Mashable. All about JPod by Douglas Coupland. jPod by Douglas Coupland (and Logorama) I went through a Douglas Coupland phase in the and have meant to read some of his more recent work for a long time now. I read Microserfs a few times not.

I'm from Vancouver nd the serie . The dark side was that each book garnered on average nine readers

I write and make objects and feel lucky I get to be alive on this place you call Earth nd the serie but really love that. PagesPublic FigureAuthorDouglas CouplandPosts. English (US) · Suomi · Svenska · Español · Português (Brasil). The dark side was that each book garnered on average nine readers. There’s too much content and not enough people to do the reading. It made me realize my life no longer felt like a story–there was no moral spin, no true adventure, no beginning, middle or end.

Ethan Jarlewski and five co-workers whose surnames end in 'J' are bureaucratically marooned in JPod. JPod is a no-escape architectural limbo on the fringes of a massive Vancouver game design company. The six workers daily confront the forces that define our era: global piracy, boneheaded marketing staff, people smuggling, the rise of China, marijuana grow-ops, Jeff Probst, and the ashes of the 1990s financial tech dream. JPod's universe is amoral and shameless. The characters are products of their era even as they're creating it. Everybody in Ethan's life inhabits a moral grey zone. Nobody is exempt, not even his seemingly straitlaced parents or Coupland himself. Full of word games, visual jokes and sideways jabs, this book throws a sharp, pointed lawn dart into the heart of contemporary life.
Aedem
I've been a fan of Coupland's since "Microserfs" so when I saw that this book was coming out, I was so excited that I reserved a copy - in hardback mind you - so that the instant it came out I'd get it.

What a total disappointment.

This book has been pushed as an "updated" or "re-envisioned" "Microserfs" and I suppose that's nominally true. It's as if Coupland decided that what he really wanted to do was to write "Microserfs" all over again - only with less interesting or engaging characters and a much less interesting or believeable storyline. He even recycles dialogue and concepts from "Microserfs" almost word for word.

But for his major literary crime...

oh the horror....

...he starts inserting egregious "conversations" about Douglas Coupland into his character's dialogue. About Douglas Coupland the author, about the novels of Douglas Coupland, about concepts from Gen X and Microserfs. About how "Melrose Place" ripped off Gen X. This happens not once, not even once in awhile - but a LOT.

I stopped counting at 10 times.

And as if this weren't bad enough, at a key point in the book he writes himself, literally, into the book as a major character. "It's Douglas Coupland!" in a cameo role as - "Douglas Coupland!"

Awful. Awful. Awful. Unmitigatedly awful. The story just ends abruptly and without tying up several minor characters' plotlines. It's as if Coupland just pushed himself away from the computer and went "Ok, that's it. I'm done." Additionally there are, by my count 137 pages of random text, iterations of Pi, extra big text etc. 137 pages in a 448 page novel. It was functional and relevant to "Microserfs" but it's annoying and repetitive in "JPod".

Someone needs to tell Coupland that most of us caught on to the "I'm going to use a really big font and adjust my margins to fulfill my page count" trick a long time ago.

If I could give it less than one star, I would. Nothing makes me madder than when I feel like an author is taking his fans (and I was one) for a ride. It's disrespectful and lazy.

On the upside, the hardcover edition makes a very satisfying "Thunk!" when you pitch it against the nearest wall.
Jonariara
For me, this is immeasurably better than "Microserfs." In fact, calling it a straight-up sequel to that novel is probably a little misguided -- it actually felt more like a sequel to "All Families Are Psychotic."

I think it's a testament to "JPod" that I read five Coupland books one right after the other and I enjoyed "JPod" the most.

While "Jpod" takes the style of "Microserfs" and has quite a few similarities and certainly has its format, this novel takes a much-needed detour out of the stifling office of the coders and devotes a lot of time to the main character's crazy parents, his brother, and most importantly Kam Fong, an insane, emotionless Asian drug dealer/problem-solver (who also ballroom dances, people-smuggles and digs karaoke).

All I can say is that "JPod" made me laugh -- made me REALLY laugh. I simply loved Ethan's parents and Kam Fong, and enjoyed every this-is-a-novel-and-not-real-life scenario they found themselves in. It was like Coupland was saying "You want more Zeitgeist? Well, too bad -- here's dead bikers, pot-selling moms, Asian immigrants, forced heroin addiction (with a little heroin-makes-my-life-good sentiment), and a wild stopoff adventure in China. Enjoy!"

"JPod" has all that "Microserfs" office interaction -- with the pop-culture/geek/math references slipping everywhere -- but it's not nearly as dense and crowding as it was in that novel. And it's all often so much a shot at Coupland's own writing that it makes it that much more fun.

Coupland's writing here is just so loose and unconcerned and free-flowing -- it's like the novel was written on a long jag of just being on a roll. I had a ball reading this book, and it feels like something that was a ball to write.

Coupland shows up as a character here, which I admit is odd (though it's hilarious when he makes fun of himself). This is somehow Coupland's most self-indulgent novel, but on the other hand his least. Coupland is an author with very obvious quirks, and somehow while often lovingly indulging in them, I felt them get in the way of his book the least here.

The bottom line for me is that "JPod" is flat-out funny. I looked forward to picking it up every day because I knew it was going to make me laugh. Ethan's coworkers are pretty close to being as annoying as their counterparts in "Microserfs," but Ethan's parents felt so impossibly real to me, and Kam Fong was so impossibly unreal, and everything they do is in that the-almost-reality-of-novel-life-reality (where you can hide bodies and not go to jail, etc.) and so darkly funny that I couldn't get enough of them. I hope Coupland brings them back one day.

"JPod" came as something of a surprise for me. It is essentially offspring from his most suffocating book and it ends up being one of his lightest. I don't think this is Coupland's best book, but it certainly is one of his most fun. And I enjoyed every moment of it.
JPod: Special Edition ebook
Author:
Douglas Coupland
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1461 kb
FB2 size:
1760 kb
DJVU size:
1579 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (June 5, 2006)
Pages:
464 pages
Rating:
4.6
Other formats:
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