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Tamarind Mem ebook

by Anita Rau Badami


Nalini and Rama Krishna Rau. Tamarindus indica: Tamar-i-Hind, or Date of India. Folklore has it that the tamarind tree is the home of spirits that do not let anything under the tree survive

Nalini and Rama Krishna Rau. Folklore has it that the tamarind tree is the home of spirits that do not let anything under the tree survive. Accordingly, travellers are advised not to sleep in its shade. The tamarind tree is never used for auspicious ceremonies, as its fruit being sour, it is believed that the ceremony will turn sour and thus become fruitless and lose all meaning.

Anita Rau Badami (born 24 September 1961) is a writer of South Asian descent living in Canada. Born in Rourkela, Odisha, India, she was educated at the University of Madras and Sophia Polytechnic in Bombay. She emigrated to Canada in 1991, and earned an . at the University of Calgary. Her first novel was Tamarind Mem (1997). Her novels deal with the complexities of Indian family life and with the cultural gap that emerges when Indians move to the west.

Folklore has it that the tamarind tree is the home of spirits that do not let anything under the tree survive. READ BOOK: Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami online free. You can read book Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami in our library for absolutely free.

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ANITA RAU BADAMI's first novel was the bestseller Tamarind Mem. Her bestselling second novel, The Hero's Walk, won the Regional Commonwealth Writers' Prize and Italy's Premio Berto, was named a Washington Post Best Book, was longlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin. Her bestselling second novel, The Hero's Walk, won the Regional Commonwealth Writers' Prize and Italy's Premio Berto, was named a Washington Post Best Book, was longlisted for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Orange Prize for Fiction, and was a finalist for the Kiriyama Prize. Her third novel, Can You Hear the Nightbird Call?, was released in 2006 to great acclaim, longlisted for the IMPAC Award, and a finalist for the City of Vancouver Book Award

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Tamarind Mem - Anita Rau Badami. Pt 1)Tamarind Mem is a mother-daughter story told alternately by Kamini, Soraja’s daughter, in the first half of the novel; and by Soraja in the second half. Kamini was born in India just before independence, but is living in Calgary as she tells her story – having left India many years earlier. Kamini remembers vividly the sharp abruptness that was her mother; and she longs, even as an adult, for Soraja’s affection.

The book also unpacks the misunderstandings between two generations that result because of a modernizing culture.

Due to her first novel Anita Rau Badami was considered one of the newest writers in the vibrant field of Indian subcontinental literature. Ms. Badami was born in 1961 in Rourkela, Orissa, India (Nurse 53). Her debut novel, Tamarind Mem, received critical acclaim. Tamarind Mem shows how two people may have conflicting recollections about the same past. The book also unpacks the misunderstandings between two generations that result because of a modernizing culture.

A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women. Set in India's railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue

A beautiful and brilliant portrait of two generations of women. Set in India's railway colonies, this is the story of Kamini and her mother Saroja, nicknamed Tamarind Mem due to her sour tongue. While in Canada beginning her graduate studies, Kamini receives a postcard from her mother saying she has sold their home and is travelling through India. Both are forced into the past to confront their dreams and losses and to explore the love that binds mothers and daughters everywhere.

Having moved to Canada from India, Kamini tries to make sense of the eccentric family she has left behind. Recounting the story of her mother's life, Kamini reveals the desires, secrets and fears that link different generations, exploring the bond between mothers and daughters.
Nargas
Badami's "Hero's Walk" is one of my favorite books of all times, so I eagerly anticipated reading her "Tamarind Mem." I was not disappointed. Half of the book is narrated by the daughter, who grows up with a mother who is unhappy, judgmental, volatile, mean. The other half of the book is told by the mother. Disparate narratives, indeed. Little by little, the reader understands this family's real story. I highly recommend "Tamarind Mem" for those who crave a "good read."
Gaiauaco
loved this book.
Vudomuro
Reading this novel was similar to sitting in someone's kitchen and listening to someone else's conversation. Kamini recounts her childhood memories, some pleasant, others not so much. It seems that she could not understand why her mother was always so bitter. The story continues on as memories unfold. At one point, I wondered, "where was this all leading?" It was getting a little depressing. There were also gaps in the memories that Kamini was unable to fill in and these left you wondering what really happened. Keep.on.reading. It will surprise you.

As the novel progresses those gaps are filled in and the whole story wraps up and folds onto itself in a way that leaves the reader satisfied. The poetic descriptions of everyday life were so real you could savour them. I highly recommend this novel to anyone who lives fiction based on Indian culture.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
As most people take for granted, memories are triggered by the faintest occurences. There is the distinct smell, for instance, that suddenly takes youu right back to your grandmother's closets or your uncle's work shop - and just like that everything becomes almost photographic in how you remember certain instances, even though you have not thought about them for twenty years. How quickly we are seduced by nostalgia...But how true are these memories of ours? They might not be false, but they are certainly highly subjective. But does that matter?

This colorful novel tackles the perception of memories in quite a clever way. The first half of the book is the narrative of Kamini, a daughter who reminisce about her past growing up in India. Through her we get a feel for the culture, sounds, smell and a certain mood of a bygone era that is often romanticized (right after Independence). Furthermore, we get a peak into the relationships among the family members, the servants and the school teachers.

Early on, there is a distinct strain between Kamini and her mother, Saroja. She loves her and yearns for her affection; however, she resents her and her "irrrational" moods. The father is distant, even when he is home from his railroad work. Her superstitious ayah, Linda, is quite an interesting person - Kamini is scared of her tales of ghosts and bad spirits, yet she feels safe in her company. The author has eloquently captured the mind of a girl - her growing-up angst, her lack of understanding the happenings in her midst, and the invincability typical of her age.

In the second half of the book, the author switches the narrative to the mother, and we get her side of the story. How do her memories compare to those of her daughter? It is an intriguing account!!! We follow her from childhood being prepared for an arranged marriage to widowhood reflecting back on her life and making plans for her independant years ahead.

I highly recommend the book - it is a sumptious and warm read.

This first-time author has avoided the trap of spelling it all out and leaves her readers the option of reading essential information between the lines. I did wish there was a map included in the book though. The family moves around to various parts of India since they belong to the railroad, and unless you are familier with Indian geography, it is too easy to get lost in the names.

I am looking forward to reading more from Anita Rau Badami!
Beydar
As most people take for granted, memories are triggered by the faintest occurences. There is the distinct smell, for instance, that suddenly takes youu right back to your grandmother's closets or your uncle's work shop - and just like that everything becomes almost photographic in how you remember certain instances, even though you have not thought about them for twenty years. How quickly we are seduced by nostalgia...But how true are these memories of ours? They might not be false, but they are certainly highly subjective. But does that matter?

This colorful novel tackles the perception of memories in quite a clever way. The first half of the book is the narrative of Kamini, a daughter who reminisce about her past growing up in India. Through her we get a feel for the culture, sounds, smell and a certain mood of a bygone era that is often romanticized (right after Independence). Furthermore, we get a peak into the relationships among the family members, the servants and the school teachers.

Early on, there is a distinct strain between Kamini and her mother, Saroja. She loves her and yearns for her affection; however, she resents her and her "irrrational" moods. The father is distant, even when he is home from his railroad work. Her superstitious ayah, Linda, is quite an interesting person - Kamini is scared of her tales of ghosts and bad spirits, yet she feels safe in her company. The author has eloquently captured the mind of a girl - her growing-up angst, her lack of understanding the happenings in her midst, and the invincability typical of her age.

In the second half of the book, the author switches the narrative to the mother, and we get her side of the story. How do her memories compare to those of her daughter? It is an intriguing account!!! We follow her from childhood being prepared for an arranged marriage to widowhood reflecting back on her life and making plans for her independant years ahead.

I highly recommend the book - it is a sumptious and warm read. This first-time author has avoided the trap of spelling it all out and leaves her readers the option of reading essential information between the lines. I did wish there was a map included in the book though. The family moves around to various parts of India since they belong to the railroad, and unless you are familier with Indian geography, it is too easy to get lost in the names.

I am looking forward to reading more from Anita Rau Badami!
Tamarind Mem ebook
Author:
Anita Rau Badami
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1712 kb
FB2 size:
1461 kb
DJVU size:
1445 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Viking; 1st UK edition (August 28, 1997)
Pages:
272 pages
Rating:
4.3
Other formats:
lrf azw lit txt
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