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Amongst Women ebook

by John McGahern


As he weakened, Moran became afraid of his daughters.

As he weakened, Moran became afraid of his daughters. This once powerful man was so implanted in their lives that they had never really left Great Meadow, in spite of jobs and marriages and children and houses of their own in Dublin and London. Each scrap of news any one of them had about themselves or their immediate family - child, husband, dog, cat, Bendix dishwasher, a new dress or pair of shoes, the price of every article they bought - was as fascinating to each other as if it were their very own; and any little thing out of Great Meadow was pure binding.

Whenever there’s a whiff of trouble she takes to her bed with the asthma. She has books and sweets hidden up there,’ Mona said. They waited in silence until the knocking resumed, insistent and angry. Boohoo!’ they responded.

Amongst Women is a novel by the Irish writer John McGahern (1934–2006). McGahern's best known novel, it is also considered his masterpiece. Published by Faber and Faber, the novel tells the story of Michael Moran, a bitter, ageing Irish Republican Army (IRA) veteran, and his tyranny over his wife and children, who both love and fear him. It was shortlisted for the 1990 Booker Prize and won The Irish Times/Aer Lingus Literary Award in 1991.

John McGahern's "Amongst Women" begins slowly, but after a certain point, I really became caught up in it. The book is very well-written; it's lyrical and much of what's going on happens below the surface. Amongst Women" reads like an unflinching memoir. And in many ways, it is. The main character, Michael Moran, is for all intents and purposes McGahern's father, an ex-Republican, separated from the rest of the community, and known for being harsh to his children. And McGahern is essentially Luke

This modern Irish masterpiece is both a study of the faultlines of Irish patriarchy and an elegy for a lost world.

This modern Irish masterpiece is both a study of the faultlines of Irish patriarchy and an elegy for a lost world. John McGahern was a great Irish writer among a brilliant generation that included the playwright Brian Friel and the poets Michael Longley and Seamus Heaney. Equally gifted as a writer of short stories, his finest novels (a small oeuvre) include The Dark and That They May Face the Rising Sun. His influence lives on in the work of Colm Tóibín, who once described him as the Irish novelist everyone should read

I find John McGahern’s sense of time and place Amongst Women by John McGahern is an excellent look at a family’s life in rural Ireland in the 1960s.

I find John McGahern’s sense of time and place Amongst Women by John McGahern is an excellent look at a family’s life in rural Ireland in the 1960s. McGahern writes a quiet sort of novel and yet he address a number of important themes. Moran is an old Republican whose life was forever transformed by his days of glory as a guerrilla leader in the War of Independence. Now in old age, living out in the country, Moran is still fighting but this time with his family, his friends and even himself.

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AMONGST WOMEN John McGahern About John McGahern (1934 – 2006) One of Ireland’s most widely read authors John McGahern was born on November 12th, 1934. The family lived in Leitrim until his mother’s death in 1945, when they moved to their father’s home at the police barracks in Cootehall, County Roscommon. In his early twenties.

Moran is an old Republican, a veteran of the Irish Civil War. He is dominated by his daughters who revive the custom of celebrating Monaghan Day. It is through their lives that we discover the story of his life. This book was shortlisted for the Booker Prize 1990. The author also wrote The Dark.
TheJonnyTest
What do parents owe their children, and what do children owe their parents? John McGahern's 1990 novel about Michael Moran and his five children left me pondering those questions. Moran was one of the IRA's hard men during Ireland's fight for freedom, masterminding an infamous slaughter of English soldiers, but by the late 1950s time period of the novel his country has disappointed him: "Look at the country now. Run by a crowd of small-minded gangsters out for their own good." In the intervening years, Moran has prospered as the hard-working owner of a successful farm, but he holds himself and his family aloof from his neighbors in rural central Ireland. The three girls and two boys join him on their knees to say the rosary each night and dutifully kiss him before bedtime, but there is no real warmth between the father and his children. The story opens as the farflung daughters return to the farm in hopes of arresting the decline of the elderly Moran, who has taken to his bed, and then flashes back to their teen years when a locally-born spinster on holiday from her job in Scotland managed to snag their father. The eldest son had by then run away to London after a mysterious fight with his father, never to return, but Moran's bride was welcomed by the remaining children. The novel recounts the intervening years as the rest of the children grow up and move away, all of them achieving success, while Moran's isolation and bitterness grow. As a parent, Moran has done his duty by his children -- providing food, shelter, and discipline -- but not the love that children are owed but so often must do without. As children, the daughters and sons do their duty by their father -- providing assistance and support when needed -- but not the love that parents yearn for but must earn by their treatment of their children. Amongst Women is a sad story that is very well told.
Hiylchis
John McGahern's "Amongst Women" begins slowly, but after a certain point, I really became caught up in it. The book is very well-written; it's lyrical and much of what's going on happens below the surface.

"Amongst Women" reads like an unflinching memoir. And in many ways, it is. The main character, Michael Moran, is for all intents and purposes McGahern's father, an ex-Republican, separated from the rest of the community, and known for being harsh to his children. And McGahern is essentially Luke. (Though, unlike that gentleman, McGahern did come home from time-to-time on short visits and did wind up moving back to Ireland as he got older.) Quite a bit seems to have been drawn from the author's real life.

However, at times, it's hard to feel sympathy for Moran. Yes, he has PTSD, but the way he treats his children drives them away, especially keeping Sheila from going to university. That action and both of the times he snaps at Rose really makes Moran hard to like. Also, not much happens. It's lyrical and floats along, but there's very little plot.
Gravelblade
McGahern's narrative is poetic. His prose vividly describes the land, wildlife and the characters. I feel it helps me understand the Irish language, the culture and the attitude. I feel mesmerized while reading his novels and can't wait to read another.
Fiarynara
Would have preferred chapters instead of one continuous story. Could have been written this way on purpose to underscore the unchanging depressive and controlling character of the father.
Eyalanev
Beautiful, upsetting, truthful work by the master. I wish I knew more about Luke, the son who refused to come home, but in the end I think McGahern holds back just enough, and lets us ponder the pain of that poor boy.
Fegelv
A truly splendid novel, one that stays with you long after you turn the last page, regretting that McGahern's moving characters and sparse, beautiful prose cannot go on for ever.
breakingthesystem
Somehow, I expected more. The book is solely about character-painting and ambiance-shaping. There is no plot to it. A pleasant and easy read but not a memorable one for me.
This book is an eyes-wide-open look at the dynamic relationships in a family. A farmer makes a mid-life marriage to a younger woman. He is stunningly self-absorbed; she is the "old maid" of the town and very anxious to please. His motherless and intimidated children see the new wife as an ally. The story, which goes to his death, tracks power and allegiances as they shift among husband, wife, and children. The author outlines these relationships with hard-eyed realism--yet the characters are drawn with passion and intensity. The reader often stops and says, "Yes that is how it is." A lot of family linen is aired in this short book. The family is Irish, but it is a very old and universal story.
Amongst Women ebook
Author:
John McGahern
Category:
Contemporary
Subcat:
EPUB size:
1418 kb
FB2 size:
1152 kb
DJVU size:
1714 kb
Language:
Publisher:
Faber & Faber; First Edition edition (May 8, 1990)
Pages:
188 pages
Rating:
4.7
Other formats:
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